Our Schools: Constitution for a Day

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by fromtheright, Aug 28, 2005.

  1. fromtheright

    fromtheright
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/2844.JPG>

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2002
    Messages:
    2,772
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sen. Robert Byrd proposes a Band-Aid for a gaping wound in our children's education, one day to study the Constitution in our schools. First of all, the federal government should not be dictating cirriculum to our schools. But a DAY to study our Constitution? That is pathetic.

    Byrd proposal
     
  2. KenH

    KenH
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2002
    Messages:
    32,485
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree, ftr. But if they start this up, can we mandate that our representatives, senators, and president attend it?
     
  3. JGrubbs

    JGrubbs
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Messages:
    4,761
    Likes Received:
    0
    I may be teaching the Institute on the Constitution to a local homeschool group this year, it's a 15 week course. I agree that one day is pathetic, and based on most government school textbooks that one day will not be much in the area of teaching, one local public school history book actually teaches about "the outdated 2nd amendment".
     
  4. fromtheright

    fromtheright
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/2844.JPG>

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2002
    Messages:
    2,772
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ken, they would exempt themselves, just like from Social Security.

    JG, it sounds like a very interesting and wonderful course, but I am hopeful that it strives for accuracy and avoids liberal myths and, though less plentiful, conservative ones. I will take another look at it in hopes of doing the same, or at my son's former school, a private Christian academy. Is it the John Eidsmoe course I found on the Institute's website?
     
  5. JGrubbs

    JGrubbs
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Messages:
    4,761
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes, I have gone through it with my family and have loaned it to three or four other families for review. My family loved it, and so far I have had nothing but good feedback from the families reviewing it. Dr. Eidsmoe does a great job, and the textbook and quizzes that come with the IOTC are great!
     
  6. TexasSky

    TexasSky
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Wait,

    Did they stop requiring "Government" prior to graduation? Or are they just not teaching the constitution when they teach government?
     
  7. Scarlett O.

    Scarlett O.
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2002
    Messages:
    9,833
    Likes Received:
    114
    Sorry to hear that you-all have such a disdain for our public schools. It's very evident in your voices.

    I just retired last week from the public school system after 22 years. 22 very good years.

    Let me give you a little more information about the one day Constitution class.

    Government is still very much taught in the school systems.

    When I taught 4th, 5th, and 7th grades (that's where you get American geography, history, government....), there were references to the Constitution in our social studies books and a copy of the Constitution in the index. Of course, the older a student gets, the longer the unit on the Constitution. I don't know how long the unit is in high school.

    I usually spent about two to three weeks on the Constitution in 5th grades and 7th grades. In 4th grade, I usually spent about one week.

    6th grade is world history/geography and 8th grade is usually state history.

    The Constitution Day has nothing to do with the civics and government that is already taught.

    It's like Arbor Day or Valentine's Day or Flag Day or Veteran's Day.

    It's just been decreed a day for teacher's all over the United States to say, "Hey boys and girls, let's talk about the Constitution today!"

    It's just a fun and educational way to have all of our children of all ages studying our most wonderful document called the Constitution.

    It doesn't take the place of intense scrutiny and understanding of the Constitution that is already taught in many grades.

    Peace-
    Scarlett O.
    &lt;&gt;&lt;
     
  8. elijah_lives

    elijah_lives
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    0
    My family discusses these things every day over dinner, to make up for the lack of these discussions in school. Kind of like an extra period of study, but at home. It would be nice if they discussed them at school every day, too. One day???
     
  9. Johnv

    Johnv
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    21,321
    Likes Received:
    0

    Regardless of whether you think there's a lack of discussion in school, the kids' scholastic subjects should be discussed at the dinner table. It's the best way to interact and stay connected and involved with your kids. When discussing topics at the dinner table, remain objective and reserved in your opinions about the topic. The kids will feel more free to share in the topic without fear. You can always give your "two cents" at the end of the conversation.

    One of the biggest destroyers of the family is the parent who eats dinner in front of the TV.
     

Share This Page

Loading...