"overseers" for the making of the KJV

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Logos1560, Dec 26, 2008.

  1. Logos1560

    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Oct 22, 2004
    Likes Received:
    Francis Wrangham maintained that there was “added seven others as Overseers of the translation, and especially as guardians of the third and fourth rules” (British Plutarch, II, p. 521). David Norton noted that a fifteen rule was later added to the fourteen rules for the translating and that this fifteen rule called for “three or four” along with the directors of each company to be assigned as “overseers of the translations” (Textual History, pp. 8-9). John Eadie also referred to these “overseers” “for the better observation of the rules appointed by his Highness, and especially concerning the third and fourth rule” (English Bible, II, p. 193). Likewise, James Townley mentioned these overseers “for the better observation of certain of the rules” (Illustrations, II, p. 395).

    Who were these overseers? The heads or directors of the companies are known, but the other "three or four" overseers are not named in the lists of translators. So far as I know, only one has been named, unless you count Archbishop Richard Bancroft, "the chief overseer" as one of them. Archbishop Bancroft was not likely one of these "three or four" even though he is called "the chief overseer" in the dedication of the 1611.

    Gustavus Paine mentioned a letter written by Thomas Bilson that identified George Ryves as “one of the overseers” (Men, p. 72). Perhaps Bishop Thomas Bilson also had been one of these “overseers,” or he may have been over them although under Archbishop Bancroft, the “chief overseer.” That could explain why Thomas Bilson is not listed on any of the six groups of translators, and yet he is said to have went over the work of the translators along with Miles Smith.

Share This Page