Paul and baptism

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by Salty, May 23, 2009.

  1. Salty

    Salty
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    I have heard some say that Paul never baptised anyone. However it appears he did in Acts 16:31-35.

    Other than that, it seems there were no other baptisms preformed by Paul. If that is the case, the question is why? Did Paul not think baptism was important or....

    and let the discussion begin...
     
  2. Crabtownboy

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    The passage does not say Paul baptized them nor does it say he did not. Someone did, that is true and, to me, that is what is important.

    Does it really matter? What is the issue with people who says Paul never baptized?
     
  3. Salty

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    Hmm, Maybe Paul wasn't really a Baptist. :laugh:
    Well any takers...
     
  4. Olivencia

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    1 Corinthians 1:17

    Paul was to preach the gospel. He simply could have had others doing the water baptism part - just like Peter did in Acts 10:48.
     
  5. Salty

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  6. Olivencia

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    Travelling preachers may not have to worry about it. Peter and Paul at that time were travelling preachers. If they ever were basically situated in one particular church I would surmise that they would do the baptisms.
     
  7. Zenas

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  8. Allan

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  9. Tom Butler

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    In I Corinthians 1:13-17, Paul explains why his baptisms were limited.

    Paul says he baptized Crispus and Gaius, plus the household of Stephanas, and that's all he remembers baptizing.

    It appears that there was some conflict in the church, as related to him by some members of Cloe's family. The exact nature of the conflict is not spelled out, but but it involved the relationship of some converts to Paul, Apollos and Cephas. And it may have related to who baptized those converts.

    Would you brag a bit if you had been baptized by Paul himself, or the great teacher Apollos?

    Remember, this is the church at Corinth to whom he is writing.

    It is also possible that some within the congregation had moved to baptismal regeneration. That might have been the source of the conflict. Paul's assertion may have been designed to knock down that idea.

    One may speculate the the division in the church was related to Paul, or over baptism.
     
  10. Salty

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    Interesting thought.
     
  11. Olivencia

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  12. Zenas

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    I think being "sealed" is a reference to baptism. Paul also equates Christian baptism with the Jewish rite of circumcision in Colossians 2:11-12. Both passages denote baptism as a sign of the covenant relationship with God.
     

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