Pendulum swings for Bible versions and 2010 election results

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by BobinKy, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    I have made a few decisions about the personal Bible shelves in my study.

    There are only two Bible shelves in my personal study and ten Bible shelves in my living room. I usually rotate the inventory on my personal Bible shelves every 90 to 180 days. Last night while listening to the election returns, I rotated the inventory again.

    One of the issues driving me is to spend more time in God's Word and less time reading different versions, as well as limiting my time reading study Bible notes and Bible commentaries. Another issue is I want to spend more time checking cross references and more time working on word studies (as far as my language restraints permit). Therefore I decided to limit the versions on my personal Bible shelves to 5 and study Bibles to 7. I also moved my devotional literature to the shelf at my prayer bench, which is also located in my personal study. These changes opened up the second shelf in my study for concordances and exegetical resources. The following is the election 2010 contents of the personal Bible shelves in my study. Due to limited time, I will not list the contents of the living room Bible shelves.

    Personal Bible Versions (in my study)
    KJV
    Amplified Bible
    NRSV
    NIV (1984, TNIV, 2011)
    GNT

    Personal Bible Shelf 1
    Soul Notebook (vol. eight), a spiral notebook to record Bible readings and reflections
    KJV Scofield 1917 Study Bible, Large Print (Oxford)
    KJV Master Art Edition (World Bible, 1966)
    The Amplified Bible, Large Print (Zondervan)
    NRSV XL Edition (HarperCollins)
    NRSV New Oxford Annotated Bible (Oxford, 4th ed.)
    NIV 1984 Study Bible, Large Print (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Archaeological Bible (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Learning Bible (American Bible Society)
    TNIV Thinline, Large Print (Zondervan)
    Good News Translation (American Bible Society, 2nd ed.)


    Personal Bible Shelf 2
    NIV 1984 Atlas of the Bible (Zondervan, 1st ed.)
    NRSV Oxford Bible Atlas (Oxford, 4th ed.)
    KJV Strongest Strong's Concordance, Large Print (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Strongest NIV Concordance (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Hebrew-English Concordance of the Old Testament (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Greek-English Concordance of the New Testament (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, 5 vols (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology, 4 vols. (Zondervan)


    . . .


    I am undecided whether I will switch from NIV 1984 to the NIV 2011. I do like the TNIV, however, many of my resources are based on the NIV 1984. Lately, I have taken to using the TNIV, NRSV, and KJV (in that order) in my devotional readings. Since I am a retired businessman, I do not have a church congregation or professors to please. I do NOT read Hebrew or Greek, and do NOT want to learn. I am trying to wean myself of many modern translations, such as NLTse, ESV, HCSB and others in my living room collection. I also want to keep a balance of doctrinal perspectives on my personal Bible shelves--kinda like the voter swings in the last two elections!

    I do NOT want to purchase any more Bibles or Bible resources until the NIV 2011 waves wash ashore a likable roster of large print Bibles. I think I may want to stay with Oxford, HarperCollins, and Zondervan Bibles. The World Bibles I grew up learning to love are no longer published. My favorite personal Bibles are the KJV Scofield Study Bible, large print (Oxford); KJV Master Art Edition, which belonged to my father (World Bibles); and NRSV XL Edition (HarperCollins). I also like the extensive cross references in the NIV 1984 Study Bible (Zondervan). My guess is Zondervan will not release NIV 2011 resources until they determine the NIV 2011 is going to take hold. This will probably take a few years.

    I appreciate any comments on the above transition.

    ...Bob
     
    #1 BobinKy, Nov 3, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 3, 2010
  2. Amy.G

    Amy.G
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    Well Bob, my only comment is...you must be the most learned bible student on the planet...or at least you should be. :laugh:
     
  3. TomVols

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    I personally think Zondervan is going to go "all in" with NIV references bearing the revised NIV as they did before the TNIV came along. After all, they say they're going to kill off the old NIV and the TNIV.
     
  4. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    A day has passed since I wrote the first post in this thread. Actually, to be more exact, something like 30 hours.

    And guess what? I have decided to stay with the NIV 1984.

    ...Bob
     
    #4 BobinKy, Nov 3, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 3, 2010
  5. Deacon

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    Election results are in Bob .... and the people voted for a change!

    I'd say that means going to the Newly Inspired Version of 2010.

    Rob
     
  6. thomas15

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    Hi Bob

    I haven't been around for a while so I decided tonight to play catch-up. I enjoyed reading your post and hearing your thought process.

    Most of my Bibles are in cabinets in the living room, a few are downstairs in the family room. Same with my books and reference materails. I'm not going to list all of my Bibles but I have "a few". What I find interesting are your comments about staying with the NIV 1984.

    For almost 3 years I read the NKJV 95% of the time and the NASB-95 five percent of the time. My NJKV reference bible has been read cover to cover 3 times with lots of various other places where the pages are falling out from use.

    About 2 months ago, I picked up my NIV SB which uses the 84 text and the Bible itself I have had since 1989, it is full grain cowhide and all things considered in very good condition. Since I have re-acquained myself with the NIV, I haven't read anything else. It is, all things considered a good translation.
     
  7. sag38

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    The NIV is a good translation. It is very easy to read and understand.
     
  8. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    Thomas...

    Thank you for your comments. I do not regret my decision to stay with the NIV 1984. And the various online comparisons between the NIV 1984 and NIV 2011 confirm my decision.

    Despite the news from Zondervan, I do not think the NIV 1984 is going away. But just in case, I purchased a NIV (1984) Single Column Text Bible from Cambridge.

    ...Bob
     
    #8 BobinKy, Nov 18, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 18, 2010
  9. SRBooe

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    Which of those Bibles is true? It would save me a lot of trouble if you would tell me that.
     
  10. glfredrick

    glfredrick
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    I notice that you may be missing one of the best translations (with some of the best notes) that exists in our era, the English Standard Version Study Bible.

    Check it out here:

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/1433502410/?tag=baptis04-20

    Many have found its even-handed treatment of divisive issues refreshing. Giving both sides of certain points and letting the individual understand the issues is helpful for most people who may have only been exposed to one side of many issues (i.e., Schofield Notes, etc.). The translation itself is noted as being perhaps the most accurate modern version. Certainly the scholarship and credentials of the persons responsible for this edition are at the forefront of modern conservative Evangelicals.

    I have a somewhat larger shelf full of Bibles and related study material than you list, with my computer resources I probably have over 30 translations at my fingertips. I try to read a different translation each year (or two, depending on the type of reading I am doing that season). I have found that varying the versions after time helpful in that I do not "fill in the blanks" from memory, but rather see new things that may be worded slightly different (though the same in context) in the various versions.

    I also try to spend some time in the original language versions, even if I don't get all the vocab right off the top of my head. I find the more I read that way, the more I grasp and remember.
     
  11. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    Thomas...

    I forgot to mention, the Archaeological Study Bible from Zondervan is another great study bible (available in KJV or NIV 1984).

    ...Bob
     
  12. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    After 40 years of reading various translations and more Bible resources than I can list, I now read three translations: New International Version 1984, New Revised Standard Version, and King James Bible. If I could only have two: NIV 1984 and KJB. If I could only have one: KJB.

    I have pretty much put off reading other Bible versions, and the only Bible resources (second shelf) I currently use are listed in my first post of this thread.

    I hope this helps.

    ...Bob
     
  13. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    glfrederick...

    Thanks for your reply.

    I have decided to limit my versions to three: NIV 1984, NRSV, and KJB. I realize I do not include some of the popular versions published recently, such as the ESV and HCSB. And there will probably be an unlimited number of "modern" versions that will come out before I go to be home with the Lord. Somewhere, I read there have been over 3,000 Bible translations (whole or partial), with 200 translations in the 20th century alone. For me, enough is enough--the pendulum has swung.

    There are many more Bible translations and resources in my home than the ones I listed in my first post of this thread. I have what amounts to 10 more 3-ft shelves in my living room. And those are the ones I have not donated or given away. And software, well, I purchased all of the biggies at one time and also moved them on out because I currently prefer to do my Bible study in paper format.

    Now, my next problem is to move out the 30 feet of Bibles and resources in the living room--to make room for family photos, heirlooms, etc.

    Any ideas? :(

    ...Bob
     
  14. glfredrick

    glfredrick
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    Ship them off to missionaries. :thumbs:

    I'm in process of selling off about 500 or so of my books right now. I'm using half.com, which lets me keep sale items listed forever until they move. My bound library is growing way too fast and getting hard to manage. Mine takes up an entire room full of shelves double stacked.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I agree that we are filled up with study resources, which is why choosing the very best is important. I've found computer software the best for me, in that I can do a more complete study in minutes than I could in a lifetime using texts and a notebook, but to each his (or her) own. I still enjoy reading and do so with passion, both the Word and other materials.

    I now have over 1500 volumes on my hard drive that I can search in any number of ways, topic, key word, phrase, verse reference, etc. That brings the history of the ages to my fingertips in moments. Something a man with a Schofield Study Bible will never be able to duplicate (and there is no way to cross-reference those notes to see if they are biased in any single direction).

    I'm not picking on your use of the Schofield notes per se, just mentioning that name because that is one of your choices, but also noting that Schofield DOES move in one direction with his notes, and a careful student of the Word should know that so as to be both informed and astute in his own study.

    About the only thing I still use the KJV for, myself, is an occasional reading for a funeral or wedding (if that level of formality is dictated by the circumstances) and sometimes because that is the version that older concordances use as the primary text.

    Perhaps we should start a new thread where we talk about computer software for Bible study. There is a LOT out there!
     
  15. robycop3

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    ALL of them.
     
  16. Dr. Bob

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    Even for an English reader without a lot of language help, a good interlinear Bible is of immense help. This allows you to go to God's Word (Greek, Hebrew) and see the structure, flow, vocabulary.

    George Ricker Berry of the Univ of Chicago Divinity School has the #1 interlinear, including a lexicon/dictionary, synonyms, literal English under each Greek word and a marginal column KJV1762. About $20 and I cannot imagine anyone not using it as the PRIMARY Bible.

    Then different versions and translations helps you stand on the shoulders of giants and see how they dealt with thorny wording, vocabulary, structure, et al and can enhance your own study.

    Like you, I focus on God's Word first, and THEN the translations. Find rich insights and understanding often missed or neglected in commercial versions. (Personally, I use a 1769 KJV revision in Scofield, a NKJV, my old 1984 NIV, and a new Reformation Study Bible ESV - these give a wide scope to aid my understanding)
     
  17. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    The pendulum continues to swing (but I hope it has now come to rest).

    As I said in my first post, I am a retired businessman. Like many people in this day and age, I am trying to remove the clutter and excess. In short, I am trying to simplify my life. In this quest, I also try to simplify my Bible reading--swinging the pendulum is what I call it. Towards that end, I continue to look for ways to simplify Bible study and focus upon the Word itself, rather than continue to spend time and resources on what others have written about the Word. I have written a few personal reflections.

    . . .

    But first, here is what I currently have on the two personal Bible shelves in my study.

    Personal Bible Versions (in my study)
    NIV 1984
    NRSV
    KJB

    Personal Bible Shelf 1
    Soul Notebook (vol. eight), a spiral notebook to record Bible readings and reflections
    KJV Large Print Text Bible (Cambridge)
    NIV 1984 Single-Column Text Bible (Cambridge)
    NRSV XL Edition Text Bible (HarperCollins)
    NIV 1984 Study Bible, Large Print (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Archaeological Bible (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Learning Bible (American Bible Society)
    NIV Spiritual Formation Bible (Zondervan)
    NRSV New Oxford Annotated Bible (Oxford, 4th ed.)
    NRSV HarperCollins Study Bible (HarperCollins)
    NRSV New International Study Bible (Abingdon)
    NRSV CS Lewis Bible (HarperCollins)

    Personal Bible Shelf 2
    NIV 1984 Atlas of the Bible (Zondervan, 1st ed.)
    NRSV Oxford Bible Atlas (Oxford, 4th ed.)
    Nelson Cross Reference Guide to the Bible (Thomas Nelson)
    KJV Strongest Strong's Concordance, Large Print (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Strongest NIV Concordance (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Hebrew-English Concordance of the Old Testament (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 Greek-English Concordance of the New Testament (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, 5 vols (Zondervan)
    NIV 1984 New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology, 4 vols. (Zondervan)

    . . .

    Now for a few personal reflections.

    Reading the Bible
    Use text Bibles. Text Bibles are Bibles without cross references, commentary, sidebars, and extensive articles. The little letters beside specific Bible text distract me--I did not really know the impact of this distraction until I spent some time reading text Bibles with bold black fonts on quality paper. The maps, charts, and outlines are nice to look at when I am in a "study" mode; however, these too distract during the "read" mode.

    Use large print Bibles. For some reason, when I read the Bible text in large black print I take more time reading and absorbing the text. I pick up words and phrases that I skim over when reading regular fonts.

    Use quality leather binding. I really like Cambridge Bibles. What more can I say? Big difference!

    Studying the Bible

    Use Study Bibles. I keep a variety of study Bibles on my personal shelf. They provide a quick, simple approach to interpretation on a specific word, verse, or passage. I also consult study Bibles from various doctrinal perspectives. I like knowing what people in the other churches are thinking.

    Use Bible Atlases. I like to know where Bible stories take place; I like to know the lay of the land. My favorite Bible atlases are those produced by Oxford and Zondervan. The narrative in the Oxford Bible Atlas can sometimes be too liberal for my theological tastes--however, I think Oxford makes the best maps. I also use the gazetteer in the back of the Zondervan NIV Atlas of the Bible (1st edition).

    On my keeper shelf in the living room, I have several Bible historical geography, plant, and animal titles. And one of my favorite nature books is Discovering Natural Israel: From the Coral Reefs of Eilat to the Emerald Crown of Mount Carmel (Strutin).

    Look Up Cross References. In my opinion, nothing interprets the Bible like the Bible itself. I try to take the time to look up the cross references listed in the various study Bibles. However, the best I have found is Nelson's Cross Reference Guide to the Bible by Jerome Smith. I used to use Torrey's Treasury of Spiritual Knowledge (paper and online formats). But Smith's guide is so simple to use, and so illuminating.

    Use Concordances. I use both English and Hebrew/Greek concordances. It helps to see how a word is used in various verses and books of the Bible.

    Do Word Studies. My goal is to do three word studies every week. I have found the Zondervan concordances, G/K numbering system, and exegetical dictionary series to be helpful in doing word studies. They are are all based on the NIV 1984.

    Avoid commentaries. I have begun to dislike commentaries. They are bulky, costly, and slow to make their point. In fact, I now think commentaries are not much more than scholar squawking in the academic realm of "publish or perish." I have purchased (and read) many commentaries on the last four decades. I have also donated and given away most of those commentaries.

    Nowadays, if I have to consult a commentary, then I reach for something in the NIV Application Series. I also enjoy reading J. Vernon McGee's Thru the Bible Series.

    If you are looking for a commentary--send me a personal message. I have 20 feet of them that I am going to move out.

    Adopt a systematic theology. From time to time, I need to put it all together. And I think systematic theology is a good way to go about putting it all together. Ah, now here is the rub--which systematic theology? I have spent a great deal of time in Grudem, Erikson, and Ryrie, as well as bouncing around in Berkhof, Chafer, Tillich, Hodge, and Boyce. And a few years with two Scofield Study Bibles.

    Today, I have become more Arminian and prefer the systematic theology from the three volumes of Thomas Oden: The Living God (vol. 1), The Word of Life (vol. 2), and Life in the Spirit (vol. 3).

    Know the Father's house. Christ told us in John 14:2 "In my Father's house are many rooms/dwelling places/mansions" (NIV 1984/NRSV/KJB). I also supplement systematic theology with some social and historical perspectives. Two books that will remain on my "keeper" shelf are Handbook of Denominations in the United States (Mead, Hill, Atwood) and The Story of Christian Spirituality: Two Thousand Years, from East to West (Mursell). These two titles keep me humble whenever I walk in the doors of the one true church. :eek:

    Please continue to send me recommendations for my personal Bible shelves--I have room for two or three more books. I think. ;)

    ...Bob
     
    #17 BobinKy, Nov 19, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 19, 2010
  18. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    glfrederick...

    Whoa!!! Are all those books listed with half.com? How about the hot wheels? and your cat!!! :smilewinkgrin:

    Seriously, nice collection. I recognize some of your books by their color and size.

    I moved my KJB Oxford Scofield Large Print and some other Bibles to my family Bible shelf in my living room. The family Bible shelf is where I keep Bibles from my grandfather, parents, and other Bibles given to my by family members. My KJB reader is now the Cambridge Large Print Text. And I do read the KJB everyday, along with the NIV 1984 and NRSV.

    Thanks for sharing the photos of your library.

    ...Bob
     
    #18 BobinKy, Nov 19, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 19, 2010
  19. glfredrick

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    The new "Mere Christianity" is probably Tim Keller's The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism.

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/1594483493/?tag=baptis04-20

    I am also quite fond of Nancy Pearacy's Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity.

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/1433502208/?tag=baptis04-20

    I have most of the theologies written in the past 100 years and find Reymond's offering A New Systematic Theology Of The Christian Faith 2nd Edition, one of the best (except his chapter on baptism -- where he follows the Scriptures everywhere else, he relies on tradition for this section).

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/0849913179/?tag=baptis04-20

    All these are works that will not leave the shelf.
     
  20. glfredrick

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    Can't sell the cat. No one owns cats... The cars are a collection of all the ones I've owned or spent a lot of time driving while growing up or at work. I'm listing a nice lot, but no where near all. I mostly want to get rid of the double stack. Each shelf has another row behind... That gets old (and heavy).

    Thanks... I've been blessed and I love to read. I'd say that I've read over 95% of what you see there, and of course there are the ones I've already sold (over 3000) and the stuff from libraries over the past 40 or so years.

    In my earlier years, I was into Sci-Fi (before I became a Christian) and I tried to read every sci-fi novel ever published. I'm pretty sure I came close. I also did a lot of reading in other religions while I was cursing God and dying, which later translated into reading a ton of science in my efforts to disprove Christianity. At the end of the day, I end up sort of well-rounded from the extensive reading (3+ books a week since 1968).

    The glass case is mostly Bibles and special commentaries (language, etc.)
     

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