Pillsbury Baptist Bible College

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by Rhetorician, Oct 25, 2008.

  1. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician
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    Hello!

    Can anyone here, maybe an alumni, bring me up to speed on why Pillsbury is having to go out of business?

    I am a "recovering fundamentalist" :)laugh: I say this "tongue-n-cheek" so please do not be offended), who has not run in those circles for a long time and I was wondering "what's the deal?" It is very unique when any academic intuition, of any stripe, has to go under.

    I have read what Kevin Bauder has said. I would just like another opinion/perception.

    A little help please?

    "That is all!"
     
  2. John of Japan

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    Hi Rhet. I hope you're doing well.

    My take is that Pillsbury lost its constituency. This process began back when Myron Cedarholm (bless his memory) took his marbles and left the Pillsbury constituency to go start Maranatha Baptist Bible College in 1968. (I don't know the inside story, or at least I don't remember.) Then Jack Hyles started Hyles Anderson College in 1972 (Jack Schaap transferred there from Pillsbury) and Northland Baptist Bible College was founded in 1976. All three of these schools took students from Pillsbury, and the school never really recovered.

    A school simply must work to keep its constituency, to keep contact with its alumni. The failure to do so will finish off the future. One example of this failure is my alma mater, Tennessee Temple, a great school in its day. However, my grad school, Maranatha, has worked hard to keep its alumni as supporters, and is still growing.

    Side note: I disagree with Dr. Bauder in his article that historic Fundamentalism is dying. My mission board is in the same line of Fundamentalism as Dr. Bauder (our director has his D. Min. from Central), and we've been growing steadily for years.
     
  3. webdog

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    They ran out of "dough"....

    &

    Their new dean was caught in a scandalous photo...
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Dr. Bob

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    When the semester ends Dec 12, Pillsbury Baptist Bible College will cease to operate. The school began as the FIRST college west of the Mississippi for training missionaries to reach the native Amercan tribes in 1854, chartered as Minnesota Central University in Hastings, MN.

    During the Civil War it closed as the entire student body enlisted in the Union army. Attempts to revive school in the 1870's failed until George Pillsbury (of the flour company fame and mayor of Minneapolis) donated land and money for buildings in Owatonna, MN. t remaineda co-ed bible academy/institute until World War I.

    It shifted emphasis to a military academy until the mid 1950's, although still owned by the IFB churches of Minnesota. When the fundamentalist Northwestern Schools founded by WB Riley in Minneapolis were closed by his successor Billy Graham, there wa a huge void for a northern Baptist college and training school for vocational ministries. In 1957 the school, renamed Pillsbury Conservative Baptist Bible College opened with about 100 students.

    It grew to over 750 by the mid-60's and a premier ifb school in the midwest. In 1968 its president, half the faculty and 100 students left, later that year founding Maranatha Baptist Bible College in Watertown, Wisconsin.

    In the past 40 years Pillsbury has swung from 87 to more than 800 students, rising and falling. For the past decade it has hovered below 200 and in this turbulent economy, it is no longer feasible to run a large campus with so small a student/support base.

    In a startling coincidence of timing this week (marking the 40th anniversary of Maranatha Baptist Bible College, a sister school begun in a split at Pillsbury and now with naerly 1000 students and a full seminary as well) the Pillsbury Baptist Bible College Board of Trustees has announced that the college will cease academic activities on December 31, 2008. National economic conditions combined with deficits caused by declining enrollment have exhausted Pillsbury’s financial reserves, leaving the college without funds to complete the school year.

    Pillsbury is committed to help current students complete their educational goals. Several sister institutions are working with the college to facilitate the transfer of credits and academic programs for those who choose to transfer. Pillsbury will invite college representatives from sister schools to the campus to inform students of the academic and financial assistance programs they are making available to Pillsbury students affected by the closure.

    The Registrar’s Office and Financial Aid Office will assist current students transferring to other colleges. Transcripts and academic records will be maintained for perpetuity at a sister college. The campus will be sold and the proceeds used to meet obligations to creditors as well as assist faculty, staff and students with the transition.
     
  5. Dr. Bob

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    [​IMG]
    16 acre campus

    [​IMG]
    Tower in Fall

    [​IMG]
    Old Main in Winter
     
  6. Dr. Bob

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    Fundamentalism as a MOVEMENT is certainly dead/dying, although there are milions of INDIVIDUALS who hold these fundamentals dearly. I am one.

    The constituency of Pills has narrowed to the Minnesota Baptist Assoc of Churches and support dwindled with the number of students. I was asked to come and teach 1996-2000 as they tried to rebuild. Numbers just never increased.

    Counting the cost and seeing the record of 15 straight years of huge losses (that drained all reserves) the school was to be "cut looss" from the state Baptist convention and purchased by investors to rebuild it and save it. Sadly, the economic crash in the markets this past month made such a buy-out impossible

    The public school district desires the land, to raze the buildings and put up a new high school. The payment will cover all creditors, give a small severance to faculty and Pills will only be a memory :(
     
  7. Rhetorician

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    Dr. Bob Response

    Thanks Dr. Bob,

    As always you have insights when others only have opinions.

    I was reared by a "Fundamentalist" Bob Jones pastor who got his training there in the 1950s. I will always be a "recovering Fundamentalist" on some level.

    Having said all of that, I hate for any school, even though I do not agree with many things that may have been done and that holds forth the Gospel of Christ as they have over their history, to go under. I wished some how it could be saved. Only eternity will tell at the greater good and souls saved and lives that have been touched by such a wonderful and faithful ministry.

    God bless all of the administrators, givers, preachers, missionaries, grads, profs, et al who came through such a great place. My hat is off to them for doing such heroic work over their tenure.

    My hat is off to them but I am somewhat saddened indeed!

    Thanks Dr. Bob for the "head's up!":applause:
     
  8. Martin

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    Sounds to me like money problems. There are more than a few private schools that are struggling to keep their heads above the water during these "tough economic times". Even state schools, such as community colleges, that normally do good during economic down turns are feeling the pinch. The North Carolina Community College system has had a 3% budget cut for the 08-09 year. However they have just approved a budget increase for the 09-10 year.
     
  9. 4His_glory

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    I was disappointed when I first heard this news because Pillsbury has such a rich heritage. But I understand as to why the decision was made to close.

    As to Dr. Bauder. I agree with much of what he said, especially that God doesn´t need fundamentalism. I call myself a fundamentalist, but sometimes we begin to think that God can´t fulfill His purposes without us. -Twisted, man-centered thinking indeed.

    I also like what he says about fundamentalism being an idea and not a movement. I do not know for sure because I did not live years ago when fundamentalism was fresh and new, but I think that those early fundamentalists had this in mind as opposed to a movement, or "institutional fundamentalism".

    Anyhow. I hope the students, especially the seniors are able to transfer their credits without any problem.
     
  10. paidagogos

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    I agree with John that Dr. Bauder is wrong. Dr. Bauder is apparently basing his conclusion on one segment of Fundamentalism within the bounds of his constituency. In other areas, especially Third World countries, Fundamentalism is growing largely due to its intensive missionary efforts. Fundamentalism may be declining in some traditional circles but it is booming in other unexpected places. Where Fundamentalism is declining, it is, I think, because they are still fighting the old battles (i.e. Liberalism, Modernism, etc.) and have failed to address the new issues (i.e. postmodernism, materialism, etc.). Also, some Fundamentalists have lost their evangelist zeal and replaced it with fighting over diminishing pieces of pie. Part of the evangelistic zeal has been converted into political activism. Some of the older Fundamentalist groups are focusing on a sterile academic approach as opposed to intensive evangelism of the past. The lack of dynamic and wise leadership is another factor. Someone may have summed up the history of Fundamentalism in the words: "A man, a movement, a momument." There are, of course, other issues and factors but the conclusion that Fundamentalism is declining is at best an oversimplification of the frustrated few.
     
    #10 paidagogos, Oct 27, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2008
  11. John of Japan

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    Well said, Paid. Any evaluation that fails to take into consideration the Fundamental Baptist missions movement will be inaccurate. As you say, in Third World countries there has been a great Fundamentalist effort. Here in Japan, I can prove from the JEMA (Japan Evangelical Missionary Association)Directory that the Fundamentalist missionary force has gradually been increasing ever since we came to Japan. Eastern Europe became a target after the Berlin Wall went down, and many, many Fundamentalist missionaries went there to plant churches. Pillsbury is an unfortunate casualty, but not an indicator of the national or international status of the movement.
     
  12. Squire Robertsson

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    The Library

    Does anyone know which institution is getting the PBBC library? When San Francisco Baptist Theological Seminary closed, Maranatha BBC bought the collection.
     
  13. Dr. Bob

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    No clue. Randy Miller, 25 years librarian at Pills, is now at Liberty. HE would know the value (or lack) of the collection.

    When I taught at Pills, the library was skidding downhill as far as gaining NEW works -with a limited budget this is easily cut. The magazine section was virtually non-existant, but lots spent on computer system, on-line acquisitions for research.

    Just returned from MBBC and they are working hard to help jr/sr to finish a "Pillsbury" degree.
     
  14. Fred Moritz

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    Director of BWM

    Dear Brother John:

    A correction please. B.A. from Pillsbury, M.Div. from Central, but my D.Min. is from BJU.

    I have my thoughts on Pillsbury's demise. Bob Crane is a hero for what he tried to do. I will hold my peace on the general situation. Your observation about loss of constituency is on target, and a part of the problem.

    It has been too long since we have got to spend any time together.



    Your friend,

    Fred Moritz
     
  15. John of Japan

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    Hi, Dr. Moritz.

    Sorry about that! I should have checked the back of one of your books instead of going by memory!

    We really have to slurp ramen together again sometime! We have great memories of your visits over here. Alas, our next furlough isn't planned until 2011.

    God bless.

    Your friend,

    John
     
  16. Sly Fox

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    I haven't heard anything further about the Pillsbury library. But if Liberty decides it is attractive then I have a feeling they will land it.

    Bob - Thanks for the shout out for Randy. We're related.
     

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