Presbyterian vs. Baptist question

Discussion in 'Free-For-All Archives' started by Jason1, Jan 27, 2003.

  1. Jason1

    Jason1
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    Hello, this is my first post so I'll start it off with a bit of info about me.

    I'm 25 and I just left catholicism about 4 months ago. I had just converted my wife to catholicm this past easter and then God opened my eyes! She used to be presbyterian, so now we're attending her old church (family is there too). I haven't yet gone to other denominations, so I'd like to get a few viewpoints of the differences. There are so many out there and I have hardly a clue what makes each one different, and why they feel they need to worship seperately under a different name.

    Any insights into the main differences of these 2 denominations would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. brandontmilan

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    well, its according to what kind of presbyterian church it is... but traditional PCUSA churches, and PCA churches are most likely Calvinists, they adhere to Covenant Theology and paedobaptism (infant baptism)... Baptists traditionally hold to Calvinism, and many traditional churches still do, but now most of the subdenominations hold to what i would call two point calvinism or three point arminianism, both denominations are primarily Cessationists, (we don't believe that the gifts of tongues, prophecy, etc. continue today)... both denominations have split multiple times, so its hard to tell all of the differences because there are huge differences even within both, but the biggest, and most apparent difference is that Presbyterians, as far as i know, all practice paedobaptism (infant), and Baptists all practice credobaptism (believers)...
     
  3. Jason1

    Jason1
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    That's funny. I was thinking of asking my preacher to baptise me again since I feel I've been reborn. Thus signaling my entrance into the my new spiritual life to the congregation. I was baptised as an infant in the catholic church, but I believe it should be done when you become a believer.

    Btw, I happen to have two close people to me that speak in tounges.
     
  4. Acts 1:8

    Acts 1:8
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    Baptism is symbolic of a person being born again after they repent in thier heart and place their faith in Christ. They go under the water (we dye to self and are buried with Christ) and are raised from the dead to walk in the new life Christ has given them.

    It's rediculous to think that baptising a baby has any effect on the child, other than getting them wet and irritating them. It's just more hollow and meaningless tradition.

    [ January 28, 2003, 12:54 AM: Message edited by: AdoptedByGod ]
     
  5. Bible-boy

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    Hello Jason,

    You have just espoused one of the core Baptist doctrines: Believer's Baptism. Your Presbyterian Church still practices infant baptism. This is the significant difference between fundamental Presbyterians and Baptists. However, if you choose to stay with the Presbyterian Church be sure to find a solid biblically conservative PCA church as opposed to the liberal PCUSA churches.

    Yours in Christ,

    Bibleboy
     
  6. Jeff Weaver

    Jeff Weaver
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    There are other conservative Presbyterian groups. Orthodox Presbyterians and Associate Reformed PResbyterian immediately come to mind.

    Another point to make is that neither Baptists nor Presbyterians believe that baptism is anything other than an outward and visible sign. It has no salvation attached to the act.
     
  7. Carson Weber

    Carson Weber
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    The Presbyterians practice infant baptism because their theology is extremely covenantal, and they recognize how baptism is a covenantal sign of the New Covenant. Considering that the covenant is the golden thread that runs through the Bible from Genesis to Revelation, the Presbyterians have, in my estimation, a better theology than Baptists, though I find it flawed in several key areas.

    One of my professors, Dr. Scott Hahn, was a seminary professor for the Orthodox Presbyterian Church, and he has a very high estimation for the OPC due to their conservative taste. The liberal PCUSA Churches are horrendous when it comes to moral issues, esp. abortion.
     
  8. tragic_pizza

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    It is important to note that there are conservative forces within the PCUSA which are striving to bring the denomination back into a more realistic view of these kinds of issues.

    Presbyterian worship will also be more familiar to Catholics because of the design of the sanctuary and treatment of the Lord's Table. We don't believe (neccessarily) in transubstantiation, but we believe that the bread and cup are something more than the Baptist's view of simply a memorial. Thus the pulpit is not centerstage, meaning that the preaching of the Word is most important to the worship experience; rather the communion table is centerstage, maintaining thr traditional significance of communion as the central reason to gather and worship.
     
  9. Smoky

    Smoky
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    There is another branch of the Presbyterian Church, the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, which I grew up in. They go back to the frontier days of the early 1800s and they are more arminian than calvinist. They withdrew from the main branch of Presbyterian Church over that issue.
     

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