Pretty Creepy: Big al-Qaeda Catch attended SBC College in US !!

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by LadyEagle, Mar 3, 2003.

  1. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle
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    http://uk.news.yahoo.com/030301/80/duhms.html


    One of the masterminds behind 09/11, the USS Cole, and others - He lived among us. He studied amid Baptist college students - Did he hear the Gospel at least once, but rejected it for evil ??
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Johnv

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    The fact that he was caught tells me that the system is working.

    But to answer the question, I'd have to say "probably, but I'm not sure", since the class he enrolled in was not a bible class, but an engineering class.
     
  3. j_barner2000

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    but don't most Baptist colleges require students to attend chapel.
     
  4. LadyEagle

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    That's what I thought. Wouldn't think courses taken would have anything to do with it--not at a Baptist school.
     
  5. stubbornkelly

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    Don't confuse Baptist with Bible college. University of Richmond is (well, used to be) affiliated with Baptists, and I think the chapel requirement went out with poodle skirts. Religious affiliation doesn't really mean much at most schools these days, unless the denomination is in the school's name, at least in my experience.

    Chowan does state that they adhere to Judeo-Christian principles, and have some rules that are similar to those one might find at, say, Wheaton (no drinking on campus, no porn allowed), and students are encouraged to participate in a local church, but chapel isn't required. It actually doesn't seem that they have a chapel service. From the website: "Harden Chapel is located on the ground floor of Thomas Cafeteria. It is available for students, staff and faculty to use for meditation, reflection, and prayer."
     
  6. Hardsheller

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    If a devout Muslim were attending William Jewell College, a Baptist School here in Mo. he certainly would believe that America was going down the tubes.

    Recently the Student Government had a vote on prohibiting discrimination against homosexual relations. It failed but is not a dead issue and the publicity has generated more PR for the homosexual lobby than the Baptists.

    The School's administration refused and still refuses to enter the debate on the side of Baptist Heritage and Beliefs.

    A Baptist College is not a Bible School! You're right about that. William Jewell the founder of WJ would turn over in his grave!

    No wonder radical muslims believe we're corrupt!

    [ March 06, 2003, 10:19 AM: Message edited by: Barnabas7 ]
     
  7. LadyEagle

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    Sadly, you guys are right.

    I am stuck back in the 50s when being a born-again believer and a Baptist used to mean being set apart from the corruption of the world and taking a stand against sin. [​IMG]
     
  8. stubbornkelly

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    Well, being a born-again believer and a Baptist does mean that. It's just that schools affiliated with Baptists (or Catholics, of Methodists, et al) aren't always in the habit of forcing their beliefs on their students. There's still a difference between being a Baptist or Bible school and being affiliated with or having been started by Baptists. [​IMG] I think U of R is a prime example of that.
     
  9. j_barner2000

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    our schools need to be brought to task for rejecting their heritage then. I will NOT support a school that does not uphold Biblical standards. That means I will have to investigate the colleges my daughters choose to attend. If they choose to attend schools which neglect the spiritual training, then I will not pay any portion of their tuition...;
     
  10. stubbornkelly

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    Eh, I'd say determining what they're rejecting depends largely on what their original purpose was. I went to a Quaker-affilliated school, which, yes, was founded on Quaker principles and put those principles into practice, but the way it was set up was that the principles were to guide the way the school was run, but not that the school was supposed to exist only for Quakers, or anything like that. Maybe it's not the best analogy, since Friends are not doctrinal, but still, I think you have to look at the individual school, also recognizing that even a religious school may not choose to impose their religion and the rules of their religion on the students that attend.
     
  11. LadyEagle

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    Very good, j barner.

    BTW, when I hear the phrase "habit of forcing their beliefs on their students," about a Baptist or Christian school, it makes my skin crawl, especially coming from a "Baptist."

    Students shouldn't attend a Baptist or Christian school if they feel they are having those beliefs "forced" on them. They could go elsewhere.
     
  12. stubbornkelly

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    Here we go with the Baptist in quotes again, SheEagle. :rolleyes:

    You're absolutely right that if a student doesn't want to be bound to certain rules, they shouldn't attend certain schools. I don't think I suggested otherwise.

    What I was getting at was that not all schools affiliated or founded by a religious group still adhere to the rules of that religious group. There are plenty of schools that are associated with a denomination that aren't "Bible" or "Christian" schools, and those are the ones I was speaking of. And I don't see anything wrong with schools that go that route.
     
  13. Barnabas H.

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    For those of you who would wonder about the missing posts, wonder no more. I have trimmed the fat and non-essential remarks from this thread - to bring the subject back to focus. Please do not use the thread or the BB discussion board to venture into the deviant theatrical play the world is embracing - and the ultra liberal church is flirting with. Thank you kindly! [​IMG]
     

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