Quakers?

Discussion in 'Free-For-All Archives' started by Baptist in Richmond, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. Baptist in Richmond

    Baptist in Richmond
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Messages:
    5,075
    Likes Received:
    4
    Hello All,

    I looked in the archives and did not find a discussion on the Quakers. Is there a discussion of them, and could you provide a link?
    If not, what do any of you know of them?

    Hope all of you are well,

    BiR
     
  2. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,073
    Likes Received:
    101
    There has not been an extensive discussion of the Friends since I have been on the board.

    They range from Orthodox Quakers (honest to goodness) that are recognizably Protestant (some even baptize) to groups that resemble Unitarian-Universalists.

    Some major divisions:

    1. Evangelical Friends International: conservative, trinitarian, belief in the Bible as the authoritative word of God; mostly pastoral and evangelical.

    AFFIRMATION OF FAITH

    2. Friends United Meeting: Belief in the atonement, but vague in regards to Christology and most doctrines; no ordinances. Both "unprogrammed" and pastoral services that are "broadly Christian."

    FRIENDS UNITED MEETING

    3, Friends General Conference, probably the most "liberal group," which eschews any fixed doctrine and has a distinctive approach to gay members and mostly practice "unprogrammed" services.

    As an example, present a bit of information on their view of scripture:

    "Hence the Friends refused to make the Bible the final test of right conduct and true doctrine. Divine revelation was not confined to the past. The same Holy Spirit which had inspired the scriptures in the past could inspire living believers centuries later. Indeed, for the right understanding of the past, the present insight from the same Spirit was essential. By the Inner Light, God had provided everyone with access to spiritual truth for today.

    This approach to the Bible seemed blasphemous to the traditional Christians, and the Quakers were often reproached for belittling the scriptures. They quite willingly denied the Bible the right to be regarded as the only and final rule. Yet they recognized in the Bible some positive worth, and in debate and for their own edification they cherished it and encouraged their children to become acquainted with it. Hence, in spite of their apparent downgrading of the Bible, they continued to receive from it instruction and guidance."

    FRIENDS GENERAL CONFERENCE

    In general, all Quakers share in informal (or "unprogrammed" worship (though some of the orthodox congregations would probably seem familiar to Baptists), pacifism, equality, democracy, religious liberty and a commitment to social justice.

    The chief distinction of the movement, as espoused by George Fox, was the teaching of the Inner Light. As the Friends General Conference puts it:

    "Briefly stated, the principle of the Inner Light is this: In every human soul there is implanted a certain element of God’s own spirit and divine energy. This element, known to the early Friends as 'that of God in everyone,' or the 'seed,' or the 'seed of Christ,' or the 'seed of Light,' means to them in the words of John 'the Light that enlighteneth every man who comes into the world.'

    The Quakers believe that no first hand knowledge of God is possible except through that which is experienced, or inwardly revealed to the individual human being through the working of God’s quickening spirit. So George Fox, in his Journal, is repeatedly shown commending troubled questioners to the 'teacher within.' In his long, anxious search for eternal life and peace, he found no help until he learned to listen to the inner voice."

    As a historical note, both the Friends and Baptists represented the Radical Left Wing of the Protestant Reformation and had vigorous disagreements (with lots of name calling) in 17th century England. The Baptists contended in very public debates with the Presbyterians on one side and the Quakers on the other. The Quakers did attract a number of recruits from the Baptists, which led to a legacy of hard feelings, much as the Baptist-Restoration Movement debate did in the 19th century in America.

    More than you wanted to know, I'm sure ...
     
  3. Ben W

    Ben W
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2002
    Messages:
    8,868
    Likes Received:
    0
    Evangelical Quakers are a great group for any Baptist to hang out with, the main bone of contention being no keeping of any sacraments. The Quakers and the Salvation Army are the only two Christian churches that do not keep any of the Sacraments. Geroge Fox was the founder.

    They split in half and you have liberal and evangelical quakers today. If there was an Evangelical friends group here, I would most certainley go along to their meetings! [​IMG]
     
  4. Baptist in Richmond

    Baptist in Richmond
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Messages:
    5,075
    Likes Received:
    4
    On the contrary, that was an outstanding post with some great links!! [​IMG]
     
  5. Ben W

    Ben W
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2002
    Messages:
    8,868
    Likes Received:
    0
  6. following-Him

    following-Him
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    10,952
    Likes Received:
    0
    I understand that the Friends don't celebrate the Lord's Supper. What reasons do they give for not celebrating?

    Sheila
     
  7. Ben W

    Ben W
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2002
    Messages:
    8,868
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Quakers and the Salvation Army are the two churches that do not keep any Sacraments at all.

    So Shelia, I too would be interested in the answer to that question in regard to the Quakers!
     
  8. following-Him

    following-Him
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    10,952
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ben,

    According to my research
    Catherine Booth and Railton of the Salvation Army were influenced by the Quakers and Robert Barclay’s “Apology For The True Christian Divinity” (1678), but I don't seem to be able to find any information further on this.

    God Bless

    Sheila
     
  9. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,073
    Likes Received:
    101
    From the Friends United Meeting:

    "One of the crucial testimonies of Friends is that the grace of God can be received directly by any person without the need for any human intermediary such as priest or pastor. Friends believe that Jesus Christ baptizes his followers directly with the Holy Spirit. Friends also believe that it is important to live in daily, inward, communion with God. No outward ceremonies can substitute for the inward reality of these experiences."

    To most Quakers, there is no need of the outward form of the Lord's Supper and baptism; the goal is the spiritual reality, not the exterior sign.

    As George Fox said:

    " ... to know a Fellowship with Christ in His Death and Sufferings, is above the fellowship of bread and wine, which will have an end; but the Fellowship in the gospel and Holy Spirit hath no end."

    "I told him the one baptism by the one Spirit Into the one body we owned; but to throw a little water on a child's face, and say that was baptizing and christening it, there was no Scripture for that."
     
  10. following-Him

    following-Him
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    10,952
    Likes Received:
    0
  11. Link

    Link
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2004
    Messages:
    695
    Likes Received:
    0
    Some say that Quakers influenced the Plymouth Brethren, who have somewhat open meetings. The Quakers seemed to have discovered some Biblical truths and practices, like open participatory meetings and the gifts of the Spirit, early on.

    But some of Fox's and some of the other early Quaker's theology had some really weak points to it. Considering all water baptism 'John's baptism' contradicts scripture. Fox was also rather exclusive about the idea that real Christians would join his circle. Later Quakers were less exclusive than Fox. Fox wasn't very positive toward the Baptists in his letter about a Quaker's response to the Baptists. I think it was James Naylor he was corresponding with. The other guy had a much more sensible view of other Christians who didn't join the 'Quakers' than Fox did, imo.
     

Share This Page

Loading...