Questions

Discussion in 'Fundamental Baptist Forum' started by Berean, Dec 16, 2009.

  1. Berean

    Berean
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    In the scripture it refers to sheep, lost sheep and goats. My question is this; who are the sheep, who are the lost sheep and who are the goats?
    Scripture teaches that lost sheep will be found but what about the goats? Will they become sheep or once a goat always a goat.
     
  2. Johnv

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    Berean, it depends on the context of the specific passage. You can't apply the context of one passage to the context of an unrelated passage. You can't do it in scripture any more than you can do it in everyday conversation.
     
  3. Berean

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    Luke 15: The good Shepard
     
  4. Johnv

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    "Suppose one of you has a hundred sheep and loses one of them. Does he not leave the ninety-nine in the open country and go after the lost sheep until he finds it? And when he finds it, he joyfully puts it on his shoulders and goes home. Then he calls his friends and neighbors together and says, 'Rejoice with me; I have found my lost sheep.' I tell you that in the same way there will be more rejoicing in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who do not need to repent." [emphasis mine]

    The "sheep" here are saved (found) persons. The "lost sheep" here is referring to an unsaved sinner (lost) who repents (found), and is thereafter no longer lost.
     
    #4 Johnv, Dec 16, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 16, 2009
  5. Marcia

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    What passage are you asking about? Matthew 25:31ff, which has sheep and goats in it, according to some, is the judgment of nations and how they treated Israel. I'm not sure how this works, but I think it's a possible interpretation of that. Jesus refers to treatment of "these my brothers" and I think he means the Jews, since this is in Matthew before the crucifixion and resurrection and Matthew seems written mainly from the Jewish viewpoint.
     
  6. North Carolina Tentmaker

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    You know sometimes it just means sheep and goats.
     
  7. Marcia

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    Maybe in the OT, but not in Matt. 25!


    The goats go to "eternal punishment."
     
  8. Victorious

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    If you look at the sheep as being those whom Jesus was sent to save (the church made up of Jews and Gentiles) then it makes sense:

    “But he answered and said, I am not sent but unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” (Matthew 15:24 KJV)

    “All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all.” (Isaiah 53:6 KJV)

    From Gills Commentary:

    Isa 53:6 All we like sheep have gone astray,.... Here the prophet represents all the elect of God, whether Jews or Gentiles; whom he compares to "sheep", not for their good qualities, but for their foolishness and stupidity; and particularly for their being subject to go astray from the shepherd, and the fold, and from their good pastures, and who never return of themselves, until they are looked up, and brought back by the shepherd, or owner of them; so the people of God, in a state of nature, are like the silly sheep, they go astray from God, are alienated from the life of him, deviate from the rule of his word, err from the right way, and go into crooked paths, which lead to destruction; and never return of themselves, of their own will, and by their own power, until they are returned, by powerful and efficacious grace, unto the great Shepherd and Bishop of souls; see 1Pe_2:25 where the apostle has a manifest respect to this passage.

    The goats? Well, they aren’t the sheep, but they intermingle with them until the great separation at the judgment.
     
  9. North Carolina Tentmaker

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    Your right of course Marcia, In Matt 25:33 the sheep represent the saved (Righteous they are called in verse 37 and 46) and the goats represent the lost who are sent into eternal punishment.

    But you have to look at the context and usage. You cannot make a blanket statement that the goats are always the lost and the sheep are always the saved. Sometimes the literal is more important than the allegorical.
     
  10. kyredneck

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    Excellent post! :)

    Thanks for the Gill quote.
     

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