"Reader's Bible"

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by NateT, Jan 30, 2005.

  1. NateT

    NateT
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    Does anyone know of a Bible out there (besides the Message) that does not have verse and chapter marcations?

    I've been thinking about the suggestion of reading a book as a whole, and knowing myself, if I didn't see a chapter # coming up, it might be easier for me to read more. I usually set a particular number of chapters that I'll read. However, if I picked up the Bible and saw Romans as a letter, I might be more inclined to read it all the way through in one sitting.

    Thanks
     
  2. robycop3

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    Several of the older English-language Bibles don't have the chapters/verses numbered, but most repros of these versions do.

    There MAY be some special editions out there w/o the numberings. Seems like I saw one years ago of the RV, but I don't remember where or when. Sorry I can't be of more help.
     
  3. Logos1560

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    The modern-spelling edition of Tyndale's New Testament edited by David Daniell and printed by Yale University Press in 1989 does not have verse numbers, but it still has chapters. The modern-spelling edition of the 1388 Wycliffe New Testament edited by W. R. Cooper and printed by the British Library in 2002 also does not have verse numbers, but it also still has chapters.

    There are some editions of present-day translations including of the KJV that are printed in a paragraph format instead of a division into verses. These still keep small verse numbers where they go in the paragraph, but they are easier to read.
     
  4. Phillip

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    I have one that is called something like "The Bible the way it was meant to be read." It is like this, but I have some major issues with it. It re-arranges chapters into chronological order, leaves out repetative chapter information and leaves out a lot of other things that the author did not feel important.

    The only reason I am telling you this is that I do not recommend it, if you should run across it.


    You may not be SBC, but you might look at the Holman. Although it has paragraphs and verses, it does special things in the printing, such as printing the sign that hung over the cross in a block, or printing a special sermon or quotation in a special stand-out format. Plus, it is extremely easy to read and I understand that it is a very accurate translation.

    It also does not leave out questionable verses. It prints them with footnotes to let you decide whether or not you wish to keep them.

    Since it is printed by SBC's press "Holman", most people automatically think that it is biased towards SBC beliefs. I have read much of the translation and find that it is just simply a very good and easy to read translation with no apparent bias. In other words, some difficult parts for Baptists still remain just as they were in the early manuscripts.

    You can pick up a New Testament to try for almost nothing. I picked up the entire Bible on ebay for about 3 dollars and 2 for shipping. It had a loose spine, but it is certainly readable.

    It also reads more like a story or letter, depending on the scripture. Just a thought....
     
  5. NateT

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    I have the HCSB and I thoroughly enjoy it. It is what I read every morning.

    I was just thinking that if I were to sit down and pick up my NASB or HCSB to read at night instead of watching TV, I'd probably be overly aware of verse and chapter numbers. It's not that I have a hard time reading it, just sometimes would like to see the real flow of a book (particularly an epistle) and my mind immediately inserts pauses and breaks and chapter breaks, or headings.
     
  6. Ziggy

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    Logos: "The modern-spelling edition of Tyndale's New Testament edited by David Daniell and printed by Yale University Press in 1989 does not have verse numbers, but it still has chapters."

    This for good reason, since verse divisions did not exist in Tyndale's day, but were introduced in 1551 by Robert Stephens Gk NT 4th ed.
     

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