Reformed Theology & Catholicism

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by evangelist6589, Apr 6, 2014.

  1. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589
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    Everyones a Theologian

    Bye the way ligonier was giving out 2 copies of this synopsis book on Systematic Theology for a donation (not as deep as a real systematic theology book by Erickson, Grudem, etc) but who besides graduate students read those type of books these days anyways? But one thing I discovered is that Reformed Theology (at least in eschatology) borrows much from Catholicism for some reason which I can't explain as I am no historian. Jonathan Edwards did not hold to Biblical Eschatology unfortunately despite his excellent writing and preaching. I have mostly always visited Calvinistic Dispensational churches but do not believe to have visited a Reformed church subscribing to infant baptism, Creeds, Confessions, and other Reformed distinctive. Have you? and if so was it Catholic like with the environment and all?

    http://www.saintandrewsonline.org

    Although Reformed it has the name and look of a Catholic Church. As I mentioned I have never visited a Reformed church (well besides Faith Free Presbyterian Greenville, SC).
     
    #1 evangelist6589, Apr 6, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 6, 2014
  2. Greektim

    Greektim
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    I think it would do you well to look into ecclesial structures in Europe. Many are like this, patterned after symbols because some in this world see symbolism as a good thing.
     
  3. JamesL

    JamesL
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    Evangelist,
    Are you asking for opinions concerning your OP?
     
  4. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589
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    Yes indeed
     
  5. OldRegular

    OldRegular
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    That depends on what you consider Biblical Eschatology does it not!
     
  6. JamesL

    JamesL
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    You must consider the aim of the Reformation, which was to reform the Roman Catholic church. The aim was not to detach and begin a distinct branch (or brand) of Christianity, but to bring Rome back to correctness.

    They saw problems with indulgences, the papacy, tradition, etc

    The Reformers didn't borrow from Rome's eschatology, for they were already Roman Catholic. They simply took issue on far more important doctrines.

    So, being Reformed Catholics, they simply continued with Rome's eschatology.

    They were also comfortable enough with liturgical worship.

    I've attended Roman Catholic and Methodist services, and found the liturgy a little refreshing. Not that I would like it on a regular basis, but a nice change from the typical Evangelical method
     

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