Regulative Principle of Worship

Discussion in 'Music Ministry' started by ~JM~, Apr 3, 2014.

  1. ~JM~

    ~JM~
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    The regulative principle of worship is a teaching shared by some Calvinists and Anabaptists on how the Bible orders public worship. The substance of the doctrine regarding worship is that only those elements that are instituted or appointed by command or example or which can be deduced by good and necessary consequence from Scripture are permissible in worship, and that whatever is not commanded or cannot be deduced by good and necessary consequence from Scripture is prohibited. The term "regulative principle" is less frequently broadened to apply to other areas such as church government [1][2][page needed], but in this sense it becomes synonymous with the principle of sola scriptura.

    The regulative principle is often contrasted with the normative principle of worship which teaches that whatever is not prohibited in Scripture is permitted in worship, as long as it is agreeable to the peace and unity of the Church. In short, there must be agreement with the general practice of the Church and no prohibition in Scripture for whatever is done in worship.
    The normative principle of worship is the generally accepted approach to worship practiced by Anglicans, Evangelicals, and Methodists. The regulative principle of worship is generally practiced by the conservative Reformed churches, Restoration Movement, and in other conservative Protestant denominations, and it finds expression in confessional documents such as the Westminster Confession of Faith (see Chapter 21), the Heidelberg Catechism, the Belgic Confession, and the London Baptist Confession of Faith.​

    Association of Reformed Baptist Churches of America > Regulative Principle of Worship

    We live in a day in which the concept of worship has taken on many different meanings among evangelical churches in America and around the world. The worship services of many so-called “seeker-sensitive” churches are designed to appeal to the unbeliever on his own terms, thus tending to give the worship services of those churches a very distinctive “entertainment” flair. The worship service of the typical charismatic church is long on music, loud, rhythm-driven music that is designed to stir the emotions, but short on the exposition of Scripture which should be the foundation of true religious emotions. Even many of the more conservative evangelical churches include activities in the worship service that make a Reformed believer who cherishes the regulative principle uncomfortable.​

    Which view do you hold to and why?

    Yours in the Lord,

    j
     
  2. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    Former, not the latter.


    Is that Roscoe Holcomb ?
     
  3. ~JM~

    ~JM~
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    Yes sir, that's Roscoe.
     
  4. 12strings

    12strings
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    I have examined both in depth, and while being sympathetic to the motivations behind the regulative principle, I find it impossible to apply consistently...and so my commitment to the sufficiency of scripture drives me to the normative principle: ie, I cannot take on the role of God and prohibit something that God has not prohibited. I cannot do so by dis-allowing announcements in a worship service any more than I can do so by dis-allowing pants on women, or using playing cards. If God thought it was a sin, he would have told us so.
     

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