RELIGEON in PUBLIC schools

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by Guitar25, Jan 4, 2005.

  1. Guitar25

    Guitar25
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    I wasn't exactly sure where to put this topic so to any mods, if it's in the wrong spot feel free to move it, just please let me know. Thanks

    N E way, I'm doing this as a paper for my English 12 class but I would also like to know what you guys think. Do you think that there should be elective classes in public schools that allow the teaching of religeon? Not just christianity but other religeons as well like Judaism and other religeons.
     
  2. SpiritualMadMan

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    Yes and No...

    I favor a good objective non-biased comparative religious overview...

    Unfortunately, it is also such a personal and highly charged issue that finding a knowledgable party to teach it *and* remain objective in presentation is quite difficult...

    Even though I am Chrismatic/Pentecostal in basic Faith/Practice...

    I would not advocate some of my favorite prechers being allowed in a school! [​IMG]

    Of course there are some fire and brimstone Baptist Preachers, too...

    So, finding someone to share without their attempting to prosletyze is also an issue...
     
  3. Johnv

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    Most OC school districts offer comparative religion classes at the high school level. Several schools also offer "Bible as Literature" classes as part of the English cirriculum. I don't have a problem with any of these. In fact, I think they're a good thing. So long as the school system doesn't endorse a specific religion (even if it's my own religion), then I think the schools should teach as much about the world as reasonably possible. That includes teaching kids about world religions.
     
  4. go2church

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    I wouldn't be in favor of it generally speaking. The only thing I would sort of allow would be a comparative type course of people's different beliefs. But I can't help but see the slippery slope that and over zealous _____________ (fill in the blank) could slide down.
     
  5. Jim1999

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    Since religious upbringing is the responsibility of the parent, I really don't care who teaches what in the public schools. If the wrong beliefs are taught, I get to correct them at home.

    Eventually, however, the radicals will takeover the class leadership, and this can lead to problems in the system....remember, religious education includes atheism.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  6. Joseph_Botwinick

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    No I don't think there should be. Here is why. I personally think that should be left to the home and the Church. I don't have a problem with teaching the Bible in a PUBLIC school as much as I do with WHO might be teaching it. Many people in the public school, IMO, are not qualified to teach religion to my son. Even if they had a Baptist minister teaching it, that might still cause a problem. There are too many problems with this that I can see.

    Joseph Botwinick

    (edited to remove name)

    [ January 05, 2005, 07:18 PM: Message edited by: dianetavegia ]
     
  7. Johnv

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    Those are two different things, though. What is typically taught in a comparative religions course is a "just the facts, ma'am" objective overview of religions. What is taught at home is a specific philosophy, which is, and should be, subjective to the participant. Hence, I don't see the teaching of comparative religions in a school setting as any threat whatsoever.
     
  8. Joseph_Botwinick

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    Those are two different things, though. What is typically taught in a comparative religions course is a "just the facts, ma'am" objective overview of religions. What is taught at home is a specific philosophy, which is, and should be, subjective to the participant. Hence, I don't see the teaching of comparative religions in a school setting as any threat whatsoever.
    </font>[/QUOTE]The only problem is that the "facts" do tend to be skewed based on the bias and worldview of the person teaching it. What would you think of an atheist teaching your children about the Christian religion. I think I will pass if that option were offered to my son. No thanks.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  9. Jim1999

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    Everyone brings a bias to teaching, whatever the subject. If I were teaching music, my bias against rock music would come through in my glee in teaching classical music, and the same would be true in teaching religions.

    On this I agree with Joseph. I always refused, when invited, to teach a religion class in the public schools.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  10. go2church

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    I could name a bunch of people I wouldn't want teaching...Morris Chapman, Richard Land, John Shelby Spong, Fred Phelps, are just a few. That is why it is best left for the church and home enviroment.
     
  11. Scarlett O.

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    I am a public school teacher and I understand being concerned about "who" would present courses in comparative religion or the Bible.

    I teach Bible content from time to time. But strictly on a "teachable moment" basis.

    For example....

    ....bear with me....


    ...a couple of weeks before Christmas, I was teaching graph construction and graph interpretation/analysis to an 8th grade math class.

    One particular graph to be interpreted for meaning and understanding was of life expectancies of humans.

    The lifeline of females on the chart was slighter higher than that of males. Obviously, because females have a slightly higher life-expectancy. Most adults know that.

    Soooo....I asked the class why they thought that women lived, on average, a little longer than men.

    The immediate response from 3 of them was that it was because men didn't have as many ribs as women.

    I was stunned. I said, "Excuse me? What?"

    Others in the class said things like, "You know. In the garden of Eden. Adam lost a rib. So guys today are missing a rib."

    It was the class opinion.

    I finally, after choking back tears of hysterical laughter, said. "Well now..just who taught you that?"

    They said that they learned it in Sunday School. One young lady said that she learned it from a sermon that her pastor preached once. One other girl said that her mother and daddy told her that.

    It took me 20 minutes and a detailed explanation of just what was "inherited" from Adam (the sin nature, not any missing bones) to convince them of the truth.

    Sooo....Yes, we should be concerned who presents the Bible message to our children. Especially when some of those parents and pastors and Sunday School teachers don't know their head from a hole in the ground.

    Peace-

    YSIC
    Scarlett O.
    &lt;&gt;&lt;
     
  12. Joseph_Botwinick

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    This would be, IMO, a prime example of why Public School teachers should not be allowed to teach the Bible, theology, or religion in the Public Schools. At the time that Eve was created, Adam had not sinned yet and was declared by God himself to be a good creation. Sin did not enter the scene until after the rebellion of both Adam and Eve.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  13. Joseph_Botwinick

    Joseph_Botwinick
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    BTW,

    Thank you for demostrating my argument for me.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  14. av1611jim

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    This would be, IMO, a prime example of why Public School teachers should not be allowed to teach the Bible, theology, or religion in the Public Schools. At the time that Eve was created, Adam had not sinned yet and was declared by God himself to be a good creation. Sin did not enter the scene until after the rebellion of both Adam and Eve.

    Joseph Botwinick
    </font>[/QUOTE]-------------------------------------------------
    Joseph?
    Why is it that I was totally able to understand what this lady was teaching these kids and you missed it?
    Just curious.
    In HIS service;
    Jim
     
  15. av1611jim

    av1611jim
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    As to the OP.
    I would not have a problem with teaching "Comparative Religion" in the public schools, so long as it was kept in a Social Studies or History class. In both of these disciplines "Comparative Religion" could be shown how different religions have helped to shape the history or culture or world view of any given people group. I would have no problem with that.
    Of course there may be the occasional abuses. But then again, what History class or Social Studies class has NOT been swayed by the particular view of the teacher?
    In HIS service;
    Jim
     
  16. Plain Old Bill

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    Having a Bible Club after school, all for it. Having it taught as a subject in school,no way.I can't even begin to list the reasons, to many negatives.
     
  17. Johnv

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    Perhaps not. Facts about math are generally objective and unbiased. Facts about religions (the institutions, not the philosophies) are likewise. If, however, you were referring to philosophical discussions, then I'd be in agreement with you. I have taken comparative religions classes in both the secular and religious institutions, and the difference in facts has been negligible, if present at all.

    On a side question, what would one think about a Roman Catholic teaching children about the Christian religion? Or a Baptist teaching about Shinto, or a Presbyterian teaching about Islam? If sticking to the facts about the institutions themselves, it can be done objectively. OTOH, if we Baptists were to have a philosophical discussion about Islam, we would most certainly come from a Baptist and Christian bias, and rightly so.
    Again, I'm coming from a person who has taken the classes. One of my children in high school has taken a comparative religions class. The material was objective, and I recommend them.
     
  18. Scarlett O.

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    ;) Thanks brother, for demonstrating mine. You read far too much into what I said.

    I gave the children no time-lines to be considered. Time lines are important but it was not relevant to the point I was making. I simply explained that what we inherited from Adam (and Eve, that was implied) was our sin nature, not any bone structure.

    I was not giving them any theology or doctrine to be debated.

    I simply dispelled a commonly held and silly belief that comes from not knowing the Bible.

    I can tell you this much. I believe in good parents and pastors and Sunday school teachers who teach our children. I had superior ones.

    But you-all out there had better be thankful for public school teachers like myself who teach Jesus and Biblical truths (under the table) when we have the opportunity and if I may say so as humbly as I can, who do it well.

    [​IMG] Peace-

    YSIC
    Scarlett O. [​IMG]
    &lt;&gt;&lt;
     
  19. av1611jim

    av1611jim
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    AMEN SISTER!!! AMEN!

    In HIS service;
    Jim
     
  20. Fishnbread

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    I hope no body minds if I throw my ten cents in but I think freedom of expression is just that freedom of expression people of other religions should be able to showcase and teach there faith as well as Baptist. God gives people the choice to do evil and follow false Churches and so should us Baptists. If they want to burn in hell believing in a Virgin Mary, or a Ali so be it. It's our job as Baptists to see that they are shown the correct path, not give them no other options, so I say the counterfit's should be alowed. Someone famous once said (in translation) "I may not believe what you believe but I will fight to the death your right to believe it".

    P.S though it would be nice to outlaw other faiths in schools. [​IMG]

    your servant
    fishnbread

    First and finale post.
     

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