Religion Will Be Dead....

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by Jarthur001, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. Jarthur001

    Jarthur001
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Messages:
    5,701
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know this is how the world views things, and most does not apply to the church of believers. Yet looking at it as the world does....what is this saying about us? They think we have moved off to the side. They see us as giving in to "things" pleasure and now we "the church" are to smart to believe in faith. Before long....we will not be around. They are not talking about rapture. Have we lost our flame? Have we lost our 1st love? Are we, as the world sees us?

    I'm not saying this is true, but it is how they see us. Are we that way?


    http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/viewArticle.asp?articleID=16490


    What do you think?
     
    #1 Jarthur001, Nov 13, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 2006
  2. billwald

    billwald
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2000
    Messages:
    11,414
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wishful thinking because a need for religion is hard wired by evolution into our brains.
     
  3. Chemnitz

    Chemnitz
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2001
    Messages:
    2,485
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gee, I wonder why they think people only turn to God out of desire for a more prosperous life? [cough]Joel Osteen[cough]

    Actually I think we will see a trend toward Eastern Religion and philosophy since they are the most consistant with the teachings of the god of self aka western individualism. Christianity will dwindle and then Jesus will return and all the enlightened will truly be enlightened.
     
  4. ex-nihilo

    ex-nihilo
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Religion

    Jesus did ask the question, when he returns, would he find faith. I think this article is an example of that trend. However, I would also point out that there are actually a growing number of scientists as well as other highly educated people who do believe in God and no longer accept the atheistic views that the public is constantly bombarded with.

    Man is not capable of achieving anything remotely resembling utopia....with or without prosperity and comfort of living.

    J.
     
  5. dispen4ever

    dispen4ever
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    0
    What's wrong with that quote?

    1. We don't "wish," we have faith.
    2. Christianity is not a religion.
    3. Evolution from ape to human is a theory full of holes.
    4. Brains do not determine who we are. We have the insight and understanding of Christ. That's spiritual, originating in the Spirit.

    A born-again Believer rises far beyond and high above any of the elements in the quote. We'll be around until He calls us Home. :saint:
     
    #5 dispen4ever, Nov 13, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 2006
  6. Jarthur001

    Jarthur001
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Messages:
    5,701
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would not disagree with your last line.

    But I'm just trying to look though the writers eyes. To the world...going by this writer the Church is just like the others religions. If you study early church history, one thing that is clear, the world saw us a different. The world saw the early believers as poor, but very caring people. This writer sees us with greed, wanting more money, more things, more education....giving up church, ...for pleasure.

    Was he fair? Not really. But I'm sure he is not the only one that feels this way.

    I use to work with some people that did not go to church. They hated Sundays, because they liked to go out to eat at noon, and all the "church " people would rush ..speeding in their cars...cutting people off...to get ahead of others. Then I as a believer heard about it.

    Now if this indeed is how they see us, and if there are others like them, should we not address this?
     
  7. dispen4ever

    dispen4ever
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    0
    Of course we should address it.

    We address it every waking moment. That's what Christ meant when he said "Come, follow me." We not only talk the talk, we walk the walk. We don't do those things that you mention in your last post. We're grateful that God loves us, that we are his children, and we approach life with that spiritual quality first and foremost. Do we sometimes falter, sometimes fail? Of course! Do we regret it when we do? Of course. Does the desire to apologize, to make amends, to reconcile rule our lives. Yes! I think about Corrie ten Boom who suffered greatly at the hands of the Nazis in a concentration camp, emerging still strong in the faith, and finally embracing one of those who mistreated her there -- the camp commandant, if memory serves me correctly.

    We'll always be around. In the depths of despair we'll recognize one another. In other times it was the sign of the fish above the door posts. Perhaps it will get so desperate that we can only wink. When the totalitarians outlaw winking, we'll come up with something else, and it will spread like wildfire.

    After the fall of the wall, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, and in those countries that were locked in as the Warsaw Pact, the thing that they hungered for the most was a bible, even one book, or one chapter, or one passage.

    Even so, come quickly, Lord Jesus! :applause:
     
  8. Alcott

    Alcott
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2002
    Messages:
    7,454
    Likes Received:
    93
    A few comments to certain statements made in the quoted item:

    "By the year 2000 only 45% of Americans went regularly to church, while two centuries earlier the entire population systemically visited the house of God."

    This is far from true, based on any figures I have seen before. 2 centuries ago only 17% were members of the various churches, and the all-time high for weekly church attendance was 49% in the early and mid 1950'x.

    "Living conditions in those countries are still poor but they are much better than in previous centuries and that has gone hand in hand with a diminished belief in the divine."

    Progress in science, techology, and medicine has led to greater population, with the greatest increases among the poor of the world, producing more poor. So science has bettered the lives of many while at the same time increasing those who live in poverty-- belief in the divine notwithstanding.

    "That [techology] will obviously translate into a larger satisfaction of people’s needs which will make individuals even more indifferent to God."

    How is that so obvious, considering that the USA has such a high level of technological progress and has far greater belief in God and participation in church services than Europe and other industrialized regions? If technological progress inevitably resulted in indifference to God, the USA would be roughly on par with Europe with degress of belief and participation.

    "Three centuries ago the entire population of the Western world believed unconditionally in the Christian religion."

    False. One reason the Puritans condemned the theater was because it was considered such a big attraction for atheists. In much 18th century literature, such as the drama, She Stoops to Conquer, diminished belief and mockery of devoutness are a significant feature. Deism, the belief that God is "there," but impersonal, because the world could not be explained without 'him,' was a growing trend and had much to do with social movements on the time, certainly including the American Revolution and the French Revolution.

    Furthermore, these projections of diminished belief are already shown historically to be way off base and the wishful thinking of those who have already turned their back on belief in the divine. Madalyn Murray O'Hair said in the 70's that America would be predominantly atheist by 1990. I don't remember hearing about it, but I hope somebody called her on that forecast before she croaked at the hand of a fellow atheist-- one of those in whom so much hope is placed for lasting "peace."
     
  9. Jim1999

    Jim1999
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/Jim1999.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    15,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    One expression heard often in time of war was that "there are no atheists in foxholes." I find this to be relatively true in the world to-day. People have lost interest in goig to church, but when disaster strikes, when death pays a family visit, people again turn to the divine.

    The "feel-goodism" of some cults do attract many people, and I fear some evangelical churches have fallen for the same trap. We try to appease the crowd. We try to outdo the other. Look, we get a bigger crowd than they do. We must be more faithful. Is this the religion we are talking about?

    By the way, we are a religion. To say we are not a religion, is the type of semantics that is driving so many people away. They are tired of our cliches and self-righteous attitudes, and inconsistent lives that speak volumes about what we are not.

    I will look unto the hills from whence comes my help. My help comes from the Lord.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  10. dispen4ever

    dispen4ever
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    0
    Aye, my help comes from the Lord, not from religion. To say that we are a religion equates us with the structuralism (shudder) of, for example, Roman Catholicism, definitely a religion, requiring one to follow certain steps, procedures, processes, edicts; to wonder if one is "getting it right" in order to obtain eternal life. A personal relationship with Jesus Christ is 180 degrees out from that. There is no structure, there are no steps, procedures, processes which one must follow, nor is there a requirement that one wonder about their status before God. Eternity, eternal life, salvation, is by grace through faith, the gift of God. Yes, we live inconsistent lives. To say that we need to organize, to religionize our faith in order to overcome that is an oxymoron. :saint:
     
  11. Jim1999

    Jim1999
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/Jim1999.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    15,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    So, you think Spurgeon was off base on hsi preaching of the Christian Religion,,,,his words...........So, you think, Whitfield was off base when he spoke of the Christian Religion...........and we can name any number of faithful preachers down through the ages and right into the early 50's when we spoke rightly of the Christian religion....It is only in this modern age that the word religion has been given a bad connotation.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  12. BobRyan

    BobRyan
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2002
    Messages:
    30,837
    Likes Received:
    4
    I agree with the writer in some things. Just as Noah's world become more and more intollerant of God and the Gospel and obedience and truth -- so it will be at the end of time. Mankind will be lovers of self and pleasure and pursuing all that is not-God.

    The 7 last plagues represent God's judgment on the entire end-time planet. Mankind will once again have passed the bounds of probation. As God said in Gen 6 "My Spirit will not always strive with man" - so it will be again.

    And oh by the way -- Cudos to Billwald for linking this to evilutionism.

    In Christ,

    Bob
     

Share This Page

Loading...