Retaining our Baptist Name

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Salty, May 8, 2011.

  1. Salty

    Salty
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  2. Tom Butler

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    I'm not sure I buy the story of how John the Baptist got his name. I actually believe he had the name because he baptized. He was John the Baptizer.

    But I buy a lot of the article.

    Anabaptists and modern Baptists were called such by our enemies, specifically because of the issue of baptism.

    1. They baptized believers only. Both Catholics and Protestants baptized babies, some Protestant bodies also attached sacramental (saving) value to baptism.

    2. They immersed. Catholics and many Protestant groups sprinkled or poured

    3. They held to baptism's design as a picture of the gospel, and symbolic of one's death to sin and rising to new life in Christ. Both Catholics and Protestants held to a different design. It is a sacrament, not an ordinance.

    This is why we're called Baptists. And there have always been people who held these views about baptism, regardless of what they were called. They are our spiritual kinfolks.
     
  3. Earth Wind and Fire

    Earth Wind and Fire
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    Wouldn't dunker's be the real insult?
     
  4. Jim1999

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    You might be interested to know that the Church of England also immerses believers. Under the floor of many old Anglican churches baptistries can be found. Also, they immersed new believers on the mission field, and should a member of the church request immersion, the vicar must comply.

    Queen Elizabeth 1st was immersed!

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
    #4 Jim1999, May 9, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: May 9, 2011
  5. Tom Butler

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    Jim, a question for you. Since the Church of England, Anglican and some other sprinkling churches will immerse on request, would it be fair to say that even they would acknowledge that the Biblical mode of baptism is immersion? And that their practice of sprinkling is more a matter of convenience? I've heard that. True or not?
     
  6. Tom Butler

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    Actually, probably not. Baptists share a lot of views of the Dunkers, formed in the 18th century in Germany, who migrated to America.

    Today, some of the spin-offs are known as Brethren.

    All of us have Anabaptist backgrounds.

    Here's an interesting website:
    http://www.cob-net.org/antietam/dunkers.htm

    Here's one line from the article:
    New Baptist, eh?
     
    #6 Tom Butler, May 9, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: May 9, 2011
  7. michael-acts17:11

    michael-acts17:11
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    The fact of the matter is that we've taken a name that was originally given to some believers by unbelieving enemies & twisted it into a doctrinal requirement.(many have, not all) Many believers have inextricably linked sense of spiritual identity to a man-given name. The word "baptist" simply means "a baptizer" & nothing more. I don't care what name someone puts on their church sign. What matters is if they adhere to the fundamental essential doctrines of the Faith. If we were to quit using the term baptist tomorrow, what would it change? My faith is not in a name, other than the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth. Call me a baptist, a believer, a Jesus freak, a born-againer, or a son of the Living God. It's all the same.

    Therefore, I don't get into denominational pride nor do I give a rip about being called a baptist. I'm am God's & He will give me my real name when I see Him.
     
  8. Tom Butler

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    All true, Michael, but the name Baptist gives me a reasonable clue as to what kind of Jesus freak you are. It tells me that you are an immersed Jesus freak, an eternal-security freak, a believers-only baptism freak, and a non-sacramental freak.

    It also tells me that you are an autonomous church, soul-competency, priesthood of believers freak.
     
  9. michael-acts17:11

    michael-acts17:11
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    That is generally true, but there are more Baptist spin-offs, factions, sects, & denominations:eek: than most other denominations combined. Southern Baptist, Freewill Baptist, Fundamental Baptist, Landmark Baptist, Missionary Baptist, Six-Principle Baptist, Primitive Baptist, Reformed Baptist, Seventh Day Baptist, etc, etc, etc. I'm just not as attached to the label as most Baptists seem to be.
     
  10. Tom Butler

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    I understand your point. But the pure term Baptist gives one a general idea of beliefs and practice. The other descriptions (Southern, Free Will, etc) give more information. It's shorthand of a sort.

    If somebody asks me about my faith, I don't have to give them a long doctrinal statement. If I tell someone I'm Baptist, it saves a lot of time. Since I'm Southern, Pre-Mil, Particular, with traces of Landmark, you know know a whole lot about both my soteriology and my ecclesiology.

    Same thing with with Catholic. He doesn't have to give me the whole load. Just the name tells me a lot.

    I do confess that I have to fight off some smugness, knowing that since I'm a Baptist, I'm right.

    Just joking!

    Oh wait, I'm not joking. I am right, just not smug about it.
     
    #10 Tom Butler, May 9, 2011
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