Retired Police Captain demolishes the War on Drugs

Discussion in 'Politics' started by poncho, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. poncho

    poncho
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  2. poncho

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    The Prison System Expands at Frightening Pace Following Declaration of War on Drugs

    In the early 1970s, the prison population in the United States was small and was steadily falling relative to the size of the population. Experts imagined that in a few decades, the prison system as we know it could be successfully dismantled, but that began to change after President Nixon began the War on Drugs in 1971, resulting in a huge influx of convicts.

    The massive increase in prisoners has given rise to what some call the Prison Industrial Complex. Like its cousin, the Military Industrial Complex, government policy and spending continues to make private involvement in the prison system very lucrative. Taxpayer money is transferred to corporations to satisfy the increasing number of prisoners as a result of the drug war.

    As these corporations become bigger and more powerful, they can lobby for policies that will increase their business. Their business is to see you behind bars. More prisoners means more profit, which means more influence. It’s a continuing cycle that has reached a tipping point.

    Like all big businesses, private prisons invest heavily in government lobbying to ensure an ever increasing supply of new customers, in this case prisoners. Currently, private prison companies are negotiating with states to buy and manage public prisons, if in exchange the state can promise occupancy rates remain above 90 percent for at least 20 years. This of course only adds to incentivize the states to prosecute more citizens for more crimes.

    CONTINUE . . .

    These are some of the fruits of the war on drugs. How do they taste so far?
     
    #2 poncho, Nov 4, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 4, 2012
  3. Earth Wind and Fire

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  4. mont974x4

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    This is one reason I am a libertarian. The war on drugs is a war on people. It makes criminals out of everyday citizens and denies the lessons we should have learned after Prohibition.
     
  5. poncho

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    The war on drugs isn't consistent with conservative or pro life principles.

    It's a huge waste of money and it has destroyed more lives than the drugs themselves have.

    Who benefits from the war on drugs? The banks who launder the drug money, the government agencies that waste the tax money, the private prison system and all the lobbyists that work hard to keep the private prisons full and of course all the congress critters who take the money from the private prison system.
     
    #5 poncho, Nov 6, 2012
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  6. poncho

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    Marijuana decriminalized in Washington and Colorado

    (NaturalNews) Here's some good news in the election results: Voters in Washington and Colorado have decriminalized small quantities of marijuana for recreational use. This is an attempt to end the insane waste of law enforcement resources on small-time pot users who pose no threat to society.

    Although I'm personally not a pot user and I don't advocate the smoking of pot for recreational use, this is nonetheless a victory for freedom in a nation that's increasingly crushing freedom on most fronts. It does, however, set the stage for state versus federal conflicts over the enforcement of federal drug laws.

    Federal government mistakenly thinks it rules over states

    According to President Obama, the federal government rules the nation and can bypass state laws to make arrests of pot users or growers, even when marijuana possession been deemed perfectly legal by the states! This is, of course, government arrogance and a gross overstepping of the limits of federal government as outlined in the United States Constitution.

    But Washington D.C. does not seem to care about any constitutional limits of power. And the DEA, as always, is far more interested in expanding its own power than abiding by state laws. So watch for the DEA to specifically target marijuana users in Washington and Colorado in the near future in order to demonstrate some tyranny in the face of these new laws.

    Government as gangs

    The federal government is, after all, a lawless, tyrannical collection of three-lettered gangs: DEA, ATF, FDA, CDC and so on. Each of them has a "territory" of power and control, and when voters decriminalize marijuana, they threaten the territory of the DEA.

    Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037874_marijuana_Colorado_Washington.html#ixzz2Ba9ky3EZ



    Nullification: Colorado and Washington Disregard Federal Marijuana Prohibition

    Posted by Ryan W. McMaken on November 7, 2012 01:57 AM

    Both Colorado (my increasingly beloved home state) and Washington State legalized recreational use of marijuana tonight.

    This is essentially an act of state nullification of federal law. Marijuana will continue to be illegal under federal law and the DEA will still be able to throw peaceful people into cages for growing or possessing a plant of which the government disapproves.

    The change is good for more than one reason. Obviously, legalization is good because it increases freedom and decreases the power of the state governments and the police.

    It is also good, however, because it is bad news for the federal government. If the feds attempt to enforce federal marijuana laws within Colorado or Washington, such actions will helpfully expose that the idea of self-government and democracy are no more than a farce in the United States and that the federal government will invade the lives and privacy of peaceful citizens who are not lawbreakers even according to their own state statutes.

    Obviously, this is not total legalization, since it puts marijuana on the same level as alcohol, but partial legalization is always better than prohibition.


     
    #6 poncho, Nov 7, 2012
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  7. Revmitchell

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    Hey while we are eliminating these wars maybe we can get rid of the war on poverty.
     
  8. poncho

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    Who's winning that war?
     
    #8 poncho, Nov 7, 2012
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