Roman Citizenship

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by Frogman, Jul 27, 2005.

  1. Frogman

    Frogman
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    Does anyone know when the Roman Empire first began to grant citizenship to peoples in conquered territories?

    I believe it was around 600 B.C. is that too early?

    I haven't been able to find it in any of my source books, or I have overlooked it. However, I remember it is recorded in a tenth grade World History Text used last semester.

    Is this how Paul became I Roman citizen? I am certain it is, but am I being too confident in relying on my memory?

    If anyone knows the dates or approximate dates and how this practice may have related to Paul I'd appreciate some input.

    Thanks,
    Bro. Dallas [​IMG]
     
  2. Deacon

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    Nice to see you back Frogman!

    The Roman common law called the "Jus Civile" was codified around 451-450BC from existing oral law and commonly called “The Law of the Twelve Tables”

    Two obligations of Roman citzenship were payment of taxes and service in the militia.

    See HISTORY OF WESTERN SOCIETY TEXTBOOK

    Rob
     
  3. Frogman

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    Thanks Deacon, especially for the link. I added it to my favorites. [​IMG] [​IMG]

    It is good to be back.

    Bro. Dallas [​IMG]
     
  4. Bro. James

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  5. Frogman

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    Thanks brother James,
    Added that one to my favorites also.

    Bro. Dallas
     
  6. rsr

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    Bro. Dallas, at that period the customary ways to receive Roman citizenship were by inheritance, being granted freedom by a Roman citizen, military service — or by providing special services to Roman. As the Republic decayed, consults began bestowing the latter citizens ship to influential members of strategic communities, and sometimes to entire communities themselves.

    Thus, Josephus received Roman citizenship after he turned from the rebellion. Antipater similarly was granted Roman citizenship for services to Julius Caesar. Mark Antony had a special liking for Tarsus (where he met up with Cleopatra for his ill-fated liaison.)

    Roman citizenship began to be extended after the Latin Wars (338 B.C.). Some areas were incorporated directly into Rome and received full citizenship. Others received Latin rights, with lower privileges. Toward the end of the Republic, the expansion of full rights toward Italians outside Latium would be a constant demand from the Italians (who resented the burden of taxation without having full rights) and often was championed by leaders who saw a ready source of support against their rivals.

    The other Italians did not receive full citizenship until the lex Julia of 90 B.C., and then only to Italians who didn't take up arms against Rome.

    How did Paul's family acquire the Roman citizenship? We have no way of knowing, though I lean toward an explanation that his family, at some point, rendered appreciated assistance to a powerful Roman who repaid the favor with citizenship. His family seems to have been of some substance to allow Paul to go to Jerusalem to be educated by Hillel.

    Military service seems to me to be the most unlikely of the three; I am not aware of a multitude of Jews serving as a legionaries (or auxiliaries.)

    There is an intriguing possibility that Paul's family might have obtained citizenship through slavery — and being manumitted by a Roman citizen. There is, of course, no evidence to prove this, but it might explain Paul's wide use of the language and imagery of slavery throughout his writings.
     
  7. Frogman

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    Very interesting. Thanks for this information.

    Bro. Dallas
     
  8. Bro. James Reed

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    Good to see you posting again Brother Dallas (on both discussion groups).

    I take it that you're doing better?

    Hope to see more of you here and at FGF.

    Take care of yourself and your family.

    God bless.

    Bro. James
     
  9. robycop3

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    Acts 22:28, NIV
    Then the commander said, "I had to pay a big price for my citizenship." "But I was born a citizen," Paul replied.
     
  10. Link

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    One book I read theorized that Paul's ancestors may have been taken as slaves to Rome. when Rome took over Israel, it took back some Jewish slaves. Their practices made them difficult slaves and many of them were freed. Some became Roman citizens.

    Paul said he was 'freeborn.' If he were not, I might theorize that he got his citizenship by being adopted by the governer Sergius Paulus. I still wonder if Sergius Paulus adopted him after the governer believed.

    Does anyone know Latin names well. If Sergius Paulus had adopted Saul of Tarsus, what would his name be? Didn't Octavian get 'Caesar' put on the end of his name when Julius adopted him in his will, or was that already his family name?
     
  11. rsr

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    The future Augustus was born Gaius Octavius Thurinus. At adoption, he assumed the entire name of his great-uncle and changed Octavius to Octavianus (his clan name) to signify adoption.
     
  12. Frogman

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    Dear Brother James,
    Thanks for the welcome. We are doing good and are being blessed of the Lord here. This Sunday (8/21)will be exactly one year since our first visit here. That was August 22, but the actual day is Sunday.

    We have felt at home here since our arrival. It is good to be able to once again post here and also at FGF. Enjoy the fellowship and great discussions immensly [sic].

    Talk to ya later,
    May God Bless,
    Bro. Dallas [​IMG]
     
  13. El_Guero

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    rsr

    You are throwing together some great historical background. However, this quote is intriguing:

    Paul's discussion of slavery is easily attributed to the almost universal practice of slavery at the time. IMHO that is ...
     
  14. rsr

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    I readily admit it is just speculation.
     

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