Sacraments and the 1611 KJV

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Logos1560, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. Logos1560

    Logos1560
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    Can evidence of the Episcopal doctrinal views of the KJV translators be seen in the chapter heading to the tenth chapter of 1 Corinthians?

    Those headings are said to have been the work of Bishop Thomas Bilson, who was one of the last co-editors who could make changes to the 1611.

    In the 1611 edition of the KJV, this heading stated: “The Sacraments of the Jews are types of ours.”

    Is this an example of an Episcopal ecclesiastical term in the 1611 edition and in many later KJV editions until at least the late 1800’s that included the same chapter/contents headings?

    In his book printed in 1593 with a second edition printed in 1610, Bishop Thomas Bilson claimed that “the delivering or withholding the sacraments is in the pastor’s power and charge” (Perpetual Government, p. 161). Bilson asserted that “the key of power referred to the sacraments” (p. 281).
     
  2. Yeshua1

    Yeshua1
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    isn't it interesting that some of the strongest KJVO proponents are baptists, who would NEVER attend aChurch of England service, viewing those doctrines as being unbiblcal , yet fervently hold to the translation they 'sponsered?"
     
  3. Logos1560

    Logos1560
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    In the 1611 edition of the KJV, this heading stated: “The Sacraments of the Jews are types of ours.”

    Along with this 1611 heading, information about one of the KJV translators and his views along with his sermons indicate that the KJV translators considered baptism and the Eucharist or Lord's Supper to be sacraments.

    Robert Ottley noted that [KJV translator] Lancelot Andrewes considered the Eucharist "both as a sacrament and as a sacrifice" (Lancelot Andrewes, p. 204).

    Dorman commented: “For Andrewes, the only way to become a Christian is through the sacrament of Baptism” (Andrewes, p. 127).

    In one of his sermons, KJV translator Lancelot Andrewes noted: “By Him we are regenerate at the first in our baptism” (Ninety-Six Sermons, III, p. 191).

    The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation observed that Andrewes taught that "the means of grace are the sacraments" (I, p. 42). Raymond Chapman referred to the “sacramentalism” of Andrewes (Before, p. 11).

    The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church pointed out that Andrewes "held a high doctrine of the Eucharist, emphasizing that in the sacrament we receive the true body and blood of Christ and constantly using sacrificial language of the rite" (p. 61). Trevor Owen also noted that Andrewes in his book Responsio declared that his church regarded the Eucharist as a sacrifice (Lancelot Andrewes, p. 35). MacCulloch described Andrewes as a ceremonialist and sacramentalist ( Boy King, p. 213).
     

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