SATS or Greenwich SOT

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by PrTeacher10, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. PrTeacher10

    PrTeacher10
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    For a Ph.d and why?



    I have been accepted into Liberty's DMIN program but I have been thinking of going a more academic route.

    Thoughts on the original question and also how the DMIN from Liberty or a Ph.d. from the others would look on a college adjunct application? Which would be better?

    My graduate degrees include Theology and Education.

    Thanks
     
  2. Greektim

    Greektim
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    I think DMin in academia doesn't fit. If that is your goal, I'd avoid it altogether. I know many DMin profs, and I was never impressed. Plus, it is a ministry degree not a research degree. Sounds more like you want to just be called "Dr." something.

    As to your question, SATS I feel has a decent reputation for the kind of distance education that it offers. However, there are other South Africa options if you want a pure dissertation based PhD. UNISA, Pretoria, and Stellenbosch are all good options that would challenge you academically. But at least SATS has the same accreditation standards as these schools.
     
  3. RG2

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    My pastor (who's on the board of trustees for a seminary) basically told me.... if you want to pastor get a DMin, if you want to teach get a PhD. Seems pretty reasonable from what I've seen from the degrees since the DMin is more practical/project based and the PhD being more research based.
     
  4. preachinjesus

    preachinjesus
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    So long as we keep in mind that academic positions, including adjunct, are becoming rare as hens' teeth, I would always recommend a PhD over a DMin if you're interested in pursuing some kind of an academic position. However, check GT's post. It is full of good recommendations, as usual.

    I pastor a church and have a PhD in historical theology from a good school. It hasn't hurt my ability to minister, but enhanced it. However, most guys I sat in seminars with would be unable to make this kind of transition. (Honestly, I didn't either until I had several divine encounters and read a couple influential texts)

    My academic goals for teaching would primarily be focused on adjunct work as well. These positions are more available than full time, tenurable positions. Those positions are almost impossible to find and impossible to contend for if you don't have a PhD from Europe or a top-tier school.

    As I've encountered these schools and such I think Pretoria or UNISA are good options so long as you understand the issues that go with these kinds of schools. (i.e. they will not be recognized by most university administrations.)

    These days if someone wants to go get a DMin I encourage them to either go to Beeson or Gordon-Conwell. Otherwise, their churches and ministries are almost better off by them going and getting a good MBA with an emphasis in leadership or non-profit management.

    Of course some folks just want "Dr" in front of their name. Frankly, that's a silly reason to pursue a vapid degree.
     
  5. Greektim

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    Another question: do you have the research capabilities (access to a good library and research language skills such as German, French, Spanish ((NT)), or Latin ((NT or History)) ((at least 2))) along with the discipline to do a dissertation based PhD???

    Yet another: what kind of college were you hoping to teach at??? A degree from SATS might land you a position at an accredited college, but GSOT most likely will only open the doors to the small unaccredited kin (which in most cases you don't need to be a "dr." of any legitimate kind).

    Further: what kind of masters degree do you have? Where did you get it?
     
    #5 Greektim, Feb 1, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2013
  6. Martin

    Martin
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    ==This is certainly true and not only in the world of theological education. Anything that is not stem (science, technology, engineering, and math) is hard to find a job in. I'm blessed but I have friends who have MA degrees and can't get fulltime jobs in community college. The market is getting tighter and tighter.

    ==Totally agree. If one is wanting to teach the more academic (PhD) is the better route than the ministry DMin.

    ==True, and the old saying that its not "what you know, but who you know" has never been truer.

    ==That has long been my concern. If one is going to go through the trouble (and burden) of earning a PhD it would only make sense to earn that degree from a seminary/university that is widely accepted and respected. A non-theological PhD may also be a good idea. If one already has an MA in Theology (etc) a PhD in History, Ancients, or Literature might not be a bad idea. That way one's job search (which will be difficult) is not restricted to theological seminaries. Working as an adjunct is very, very important as well. Colleges want experienced teachers and scholars. It is a very bad idea to wait until one has completed one's PhD. Use the MA to get adjuct jobs at colleges, seminaries, and community colleges. Not only that, do a great job for them and build a strong list of connections and references. Also work on building the academic vita (resume).

    Hope this helps someone.
     
  7. Martin

    Martin
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    ==Hello and I pray that God leads you into His perfect will for you concerning your education and future ministry (whatever form that might take). Liberty University is a good school (I earned my first MA through Liberty). However a DMin degree is a ministry degree and not really intended for those who wish to pursue a more academic track. Have you considered Liberty University's PhD program in Theology and Apologetics? That might be more along the lines of what you need.

    ==The PhD will always look better in an academic setting. You need to work on setting yourself apart though. PhDs in theology are a "dime a dozen". I don't know your background, desire, or calling, but it might be worth considering a PhD program that is not theological in nature. A PhD in History, the Ancients, Philosophy, or Literature, might help. These fields can widen your job search beyond Christian colleges and theological seminaries. You also need to make sure you do your research under a respected scholar who knows their field and is respected in their field.

    I'm going to be honest with you. You have chosen a very difficult career field. The current job market in higher education is tough. Budget cuts, changes in financial aid, dropping enrollment (yes, the bubble has busted), the advent of new technology, and a glut of qualified applicants make the academic job search difficult. However it is not impossible if this is what God is calling you to. Obey God and He will take care of the results.
     

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