SBC Holman Study Bible

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Russ Kelly, Mar 21, 2004.

  1. Russ Kelly

    Russ Kelly
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    I am curious and admit that I am "out of the loop" about the new SBC Holman Study Bible.
    (1) Why is it needed? Are there so many flaws in the NIV or NAS that "another" Bible is needed?
    (2) Will it be pushed as the "official" Bible to be quoted in Sunday School lessons and convention literature?
    (3) Since Baptists have taunted other churches for having their own Bible, where does this place Baptists?
     
  2. Hardsheller

    Hardsheller
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    If you own the copyright to your own version of the Bible you don't have to pay Royalties every time you print a copy. Broadman and Holman prints a lot of Bibles. This will increase revenue.
     
  3. Kiffin

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    I think the Holman is better than the NIV from what I have read. I don't believe it can match the literalness of the NASB however

    Boy, is it being pushed now! :cool:

    They claim it is not a Baptist translation but it is hard to say that because of the close connection between the SBC and Holman. I do have suspicions this is all about money BUT I do like the HCSB. Time will tell if it will become popular. [​IMG]
     
  4. Phillip

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    Yes, everybody knows it is about money. NIV is the most popular MV version on the market and supposedly has now exceeded sales of the KJV.

    The NIV is also the highest of all of the copyright fees. Therefore, if your going to quote a popular Bible, it is going to cost money.

    The NIV is also going to be tainted very soon if its publisher actually comes out with the "gender neutral" New NIV. This will taint the old one because of association and don't think the Baptists are preparing for this. They would rather get rid of the NIV now than wait until the other bible comes out.

    So, there is more motivation, but it all boils down to money both for the Bible, but also for the materials (risking still using the NIV if it becomes unpopular due to association), or just the plain very high licensing costs of the NIV. If you want to see the difference in licensing prices between NIV and nasb for instance, Look at the prices for unlocking individual versions of each in Bible software. The NIV will "hands-down" be much higher.

    Why the NASB is not used? One, it is not nearly as popular as the NIV. The Baptists, with their huge stores and material publishing can literally MAKE the Holman Bible popular. I have read the New Testament and it is actually easier to read than the NIV and seems very accurate too. This is the reason Sunday School lessons already quote the Holman and the KJV. This probably saves them many thousands in licensing fees for every book they quote from. The NIV allows a certain amount of quoting without charging a licensing fee, but I doubt this includes the Baptist lesson books. If it does not, then the other reasons (such as NIV's younger sister) may be a big reason. Why get caught up in that mess if you don't have to?

    Just some thoughts.

    Yes, time will tell if it will become popular. But, with its easy to read text, good quality and the marketing the SBC can put into it, it will no doubt be made popular. Plus, with major publication in the training books published for churches, people will buy it for a new MV to keep up.


    90% of popularity is based not on the product, but on the marketing put behind it. NIV's publishers are good at marketing too.
     
  5. USN2Pulpit

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    I think in the long run, SBC is showing good stewardship...they will no longer have to pay royalties for their use of other versions if they stick to the HCSB. I feel that there will always be the alternate of KJV available for those who prefer it.
     
  6. Phillip

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    I think you are exactly right. It does not make sense for an organization to continue paying extremely high royalties if they have the capability to do it themselves, plus maybe make some money to help run the organization itself. I do like the way the SBC prints scripture in both KJV and Holman, it gives the opportunity to use the translation you like best (especially for older folks who grew up with the KJV--they aren't really KJVO's they just like it better) and then a good Modern English alternative. Comparisons between the two can be made on the spot, also.

    Good post, I think you hit the nail on the head! ;)
     
  7. riverwalker

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    I have downloaded and started to read the UPDV( http://www.updated.org/ ) and I find it to resemble the NASB and KJV. Does anyone know much or have an opinion about this new version?
     
  8. riverwalker

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    UPDV has a great copywrite policy, too. Not very strict at all.
     
  9. Russ Kelly

    Russ Kelly
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    About six years agao I began writing my Ph.D. using the NIV. After getting about half through, I started over using the beccaue I thought that the KJV was closer to my favorite NAS than the NIV.

    Well, after all that you folks have said, I guess that I cannot blame them for wanting to save some money.
    The trend has started. Soon each major denominatin will have their own version for the same reason --saving money.
    Next, the Protestants will sound like they used to sound when they ganged up on the Catholics about their different Bible.
    Oh well, that's progress.
     
  10. Keith M

    Keith M
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    This is the first I have heard of the UPDV. I did a quick check on a few verses I use to help me form a preliminary opinion on what I think of a particular version. One thing I was pleased with is that the UPDV uses the word "virgin" in both Isaiah 7:14 and Matthew 1:23. Many of the MVs use other words.

    As for the HCSB, I have read portions of it both online and in a paperback New Testament version. The SBC says it is not making a Baptist Bible. I will have to believe the SBC for the time being, at least. Only time will tell what influence the HCSB may have. I do anticipate the April 15 release of the print version of the entire Bible, and look forward to picking up a copy...

    [ March 27, 2004, 05:50 PM: Message edited by: Keith M ]
     
  11. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    Oops, i didn't realise this is a second
    HCSB thread. I got my preordered HCSB
    full Bible a week ago Saturday.

    Old HCSB thread

    [​IMG]
     

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