Secession petitions filed in 20 states

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by Judith, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. Judith

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  2. Squire Robertsson

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    I thought this question was settled at Appomattox Courthouse. Lee the Confederate general surrendered to Grant the Union general.
     
  3. poncho

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    Lincoln forgot to delete the tenth amendment.
     
  4. saturneptune

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    Good answer. There is no provision in the Constititution for states to secede from the union.
     
  5. poncho

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    The federal government doesn't abide by the constitution anymore so why should the states? It would be an act of utter hypocrisy on the part of the federal government to hold the states to the same law it refuses to follow. However the federal government thus far has shown no aversion to showing itself to be ever more hypocritical in the fullest sense of the word.
     
    #5 poncho, Nov 12, 2012
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  6. saturneptune

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    I think the end is near. I have agreed with your last few posts. One thing that the Constitution mentions (if we were following it) is amending the Constitution by a Constiutional Convention. This is rarely talked about, because it takes the process away from the politicians. In that case, almost any outcome is possible. What are the chances of a Constitutional Convention? If the powers that be thought that was a rea possibility, then your head would swim at the swiftness of the other path that we usually follow and take years to ratify.
     
  7. poncho

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    At this point I think it more likely that the constitution will be suspended and replaced with a dictatorship of some sort. All the "laws" are in place now to make that a reality.

    All that's needed is the right set of circumstances or crisis whether real or simulated to trigger it. And of course the majority of people would rush to put on their own shackles for a promise of security. It's seems to be a bad habit we've gotten into lately.
     
    #7 poncho, Nov 12, 2012
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  8. saturneptune

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    I was just wondering, since you do lots of reading on subjects such as this, have you read much about the Constitutional Convention option, and the changes it could bring?
     
  9. Salty

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    But where is the provision that prohibits a State or Commonwealth to secede?
     
  10. Aaron

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    That's right, folks. Time to roll over and simply cede your liberty.
     
  11. Salty

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    Is anyone going to answer my question?
     
  12. poncho

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    There is no provision that I can find that prohibits a State or Commonwealth to secede in the constitution Salty.

    SN, have you by chance ever heard of St. George Tucker and his View of the Constitution?

    Given the massive changes in the extent and distribution of political power since the Civil War, and the resulting adjustments in accepted understandings of the Constitution, Tucker’s principles of states’ rights and limited government are likely to seem strange to Americans today, unless it is remembered that these principles were the prevailing ideas not only during Tucker’s time but also for several generations after.
    [1]
     
    #12 poncho, Nov 14, 2012
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  13. billwald

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    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/orl-cfb-top-100-companies-2011,0,4290703.htmlstory

    Florida is designed for military related jobs, tourists and retired people. Most retired people get at least half their money from Social Security.

    http://florida-agriculture.com/consumers/crops/agoverview/

    Total income from agriculture is around 3.2 billion if I added correctly. Population is around 20 million. If Florida left the US and didn't receive government checks the people would starve in a very short time. Or would Florida people expect to still live off US checks?
     
  14. poncho

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    3 Myths About Secession

    1. The Constitution does not prohibit secession. The legal argument boils down to this: 1. The Constitution does not mention secession. In any way. 2. The Tenth Amendment says: "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people." Now I don't have a Ph.D. in logic, but even I can figure out that if something is not mentioned, then, according to the 10th Amendment, it isn't prohibited to the states. In fact, it is the opposite of prohibited. Now I know that the Supreme Court says no secession allowed, which means the federal government has declared that you can't escape the federal government. Gee, that's no shocker. So, sure, if you believe that the federal government should be the last word on what the federal government can and cannot do, then that's fine. Just don't pretend that we have constitutional government. If the federal government gets to decide what the Constitution says, then the Constitution is nothing more than a suggestion box for the feds.

    2. The Civil War did not "settle" the issue. Well, it settled the issue in the way that I settled the matter of ownership of that Steve Garvey baseball card when I beat up that other kid and took it. (OK, that never happened, but you get my point.) Secession was never settled beyond the federal government's assertion that it has the right to kill people who try to exercise their rights protected by the Tenth Amendment.

    3. Secession is treason/unAmerican/craaaazy/for slavers only. Prior to the confederacy, there were some slaveowners who got together and seceded from their government. They were called Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. If you're opposed to the secession of 1776, then that's fine, you might be consistent on this issue, but if you're one of these right-wing pundits who thinks the Declaration of Independence should be read aloud every July 4, and then says that secession is nutso, you might try actually reading that document you profess to love.


    CONTINUE . . .

    Does that answer your question Salty?
     

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