Seeing as how there's not a "computer" topic....

Discussion in 'Computers & Website Forum' started by Don, Apr 29, 2002.

  1. Don

    Don
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    ...or if there is, I missed it somewhere....

    Just wanted to relate to y'all my misadventures with upgrading my computer recently.

    First off, the pimply-faced kid running the tech support desk at Staples ain't a professional!

    Started off by buying a flat screen monitor; but it wouldn't work. So I bought a new video card and another 128megs of RAM; not only didn't work, but computer stopped working properly.

    So I took it to the mom-and-pop outfit up the road, and told 'em I thought maybe I had fried the motherboard. They told me I had a bad video card. So I put the original card back in; no good. Bought another video card; no good. Took it back to the mom-and-pop "professionals"; they ran some more tests, and told me my motherboard was bad (go figure; seems I heard that somewhere before....).

    So I bought new motherboard, took video card back to Staples. Installed new motherboard, and wha-la! Video! Flat screen monitor works! I'm SOOOOO happy--until I realize I can't connect to the internet....

    Now, I've got two computers hooked to a router which is hooked to a cable modem. I've got everybody and their brother telling me I've got a bad network card. Can't be, I tell 'em; the two computers can see each other, and swap files. So the card's gotta be good.

    Well, then, there's something wrong with your router. Check your DHCP settings. Or it's gotta be a driver conflict. So I basically spent the last three weeks, taking time here and there, playing with network settings and drivers: uninstalling, reinstalling, installing, deleting, reinstalling again, blah blah, blah, yada yada yada...I've got messages out to the geeks at Extreme Tech, and I'm getting all sorts of "start your computer in Safe Mode and uninstall everything" types of messages...or ya gotta reformat your hard drive and start clean...and I'm getting nowhere with any of the advice....

    Today, as I prepare to format the hard drive, I uninstalled some programs, and ran a "repair files" on Internet Explorer--and wham, I'm connecting to the internet.

    Computers, friends and neighbors, are God's way of telling us we don't know nearly as much as we'd like to think we do....

    [​IMG]

    [ April 29, 2002, 11:17 PM: Message edited by: Don ]
     
  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Kinda makes you miss the old days when you were a kid and only had an etch-a-sketch, doesn't it Don?

    Etch-a-sketch instructions:

    Re-boot - flip over
    New file - flip over
    Delete file- flip over
    Show desktop - flip over
    Save file - don't flip over

    ;)
     
  3. Bible Believing Bill

    Bible Believing Bill
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    I can relate Don. I recently had a problem with my printer and in attempting to restore the driver I somehow messed up alot of other things. After getting my printer to work, I couldn't access my money files. I couldn't access my backup money file either. I uninstalled, reinstalled and still couldn't access my date. I finally formatted my hard drive reinstalled windows then restored my backup and viola everything worked.

    Bill
     
  4. Don

    Don
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    For one lousy driver file, eh, Bill?

    The funny thing is, I've still got the geeks over at the computer forums giving me tips, after I left a message saying everything's fixed!

    Read in the comic strip "Shoe," right after the Wizard slapped a computer monitor: Don't forget--computers need discipline, too!
     
  5. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  6. Bible Believing Bill

    Bible Believing Bill
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    Yup all over one lousy driver file. It just goes to show I should have followed windows rule number one. If windows asks you if you really want to do something, 99 times out of 100 you don't want to to do it. I forgot that rule and answereed yes. :eek:

    Bill
     
  7. Gina B

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    LOL! How true! Maybe they should change the question to more of a statement...like "Come on now, you don't REALLY want to do that, but if you insist the YES button will be available in 30 minutes. Take some time, think about it..." :D
    da Gina
     
  8. Gina B

    Gina B
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    Oh, and that reminds me of the time I deleted the "WinZip" file and couldn't open any files for a while. I saw the "Win" part and immediately thought "I never meant to download anything about Winnie the Pooh off the net!", and I tossed it. They really should test people's intelligence before they let them buy computers! ;)
    da Gina
     
  9. pinoybaptist

    pinoybaptist
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    Gina:
    I always get stomach cramps rotf-laughing everytime I read your posts.

    Don:
    Out of curiousity, what actually got your problems fixed ? I work at Comcast's High Speed
    Department Call Center and sometimes get calls with problems like yours which we then send to tier 2.0 (I'm at tier 1).
    I'm curious because seems to me like simply running the DOS command line and doing a release-all, renew/all should restore things. I dared work with somebody once (though procedures state we are to transfer stuff like that to tier 2) and
    all I asked the caller to do was unplug the ethernet cable, plug it back in, and reboot, and it worked.
    But yours seems to be a little more complex.
    Tell me about it, if you will.
    Thanks. God bless.
     
  10. Ernie Brazee

    Ernie Brazee
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    My sentiments Clint!

    Installed new CDR-W. Computer wouldn't boot. Went to computer shop, hard drive less than one year old no good. Data on old drive can't be recovered...........!!!!!! Realize what that means? 8 years of data gone, except for a little downloaded to CD.

    So yes Clint I pund my head on my desk regularly.

    I won't even discuss the pleasure of upgrading to XP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Ernie
     
  11. Helen

    Helen
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    There's a driver???

    I thought I was in charge of this thing.

    For obvious reasons, my brother sent me the following not too long ago --

    =========

    SHOULD MY LOVED ONE BE PLACED IN AN ASSISTED COMPUTING FACILITY?

    For family members, it is often the most difficult and painful decision
    they will face: to accept that a loved one - a parent, a spouse, perhaps
    a sibling - is technologically impaired and should no longer be allowed
    to live independently, or come near a computer or electronic device
    without direct supervision. The time has come to place that loved one
    into the care of an Assisted Computing Facility.

    But you have questions. So many questions. We at Silicon Pines want to help.

    WHAT EXACTLY IS AN "ASSISTED COMPUTING FACILITY"?

    Sometimes referred to as "Homes for the Technologically Infirm,"
    "Technical Invalid Care Centers," or "Homes for the Technically Challenged,"
    Assisted Computing Facilities (ACFs) are modeled on assisted living facilities,
    and provide a safe, structured residential environment for those unable to
    Handle even the most common, everyday multitasks.

    Most fully accredited ACFs, like Silicon Pines, are an oasis of hope and
    encouragement that allow residents to lead productive, technologically
    relevant lives without the fear and anxiety associated with actually
    having to understand or execute the technologies themselves.

    WHO SHOULD BE IN AN ACF?

    Sadly, technology is advancing at such a dramatic rate that many millions,
    of all ages, will never truly be able to understand it, putting an undue burden
    on those friends and family members who must explain it to them. But unless
    the loved one is suffering from a truly debilitating affliction, such as
    Reinstallzheimers, the decision to commit is entirely personal. You must ask
    yourself: "How frustrated am I that my parent/sibling/spouse is unable to open
    an email attachment?" "How much of my time should be taken up explaining how
    RAM is different from hard drive memory?" "How many times can I bear to hear
    my dad say, 'Hey, can I replace the motherboard with a fatherboard? Ha ha ha!'"

    To make things easier, we have prepared a list of Warning Signs which we
    encourage you to return to often; or, if you can't figure out how to bookmark it,
    print out. Also, please take a moment to read "I'm Glad I'm in Here! - A Resident's
    Story."

    MUST IT BE FAMILY, OR CAN I PLACE ANYONE IN AN ACF?

    Several corporations have sought permission to have certain employees,
    or at times entire sales departments, committed to ACFs. At present,
    however, individuals can be committed only by direct family or self- internment.
    The reason is simple: there are not nearly enough ACFs in the world to
    accommodate all the technologically challenged. For example, there are currently
    only 860,000 beds available in ACFs, but there are 29 million AOL users.

    HOW MUCH WILL IT COST?

    ACF rents range from free up to $12,500 per month. The disparity is currently
    a point of contention in the ACF industry. Many residents are covered through
    government programs such as Compucaid or Compucare, but reimbursement
    rates are low and only cover a portion of the fees. Exacerbating the situation
    are the HMOs (HelpDesk Maintenance Organizations), which often deny coverage,
    forcing residents to pay out of pocket or turn to expensive private techcare
    insurers such as BlueCache/BlueScreen. Offsetting the costs are technology
    companies themselves, many of which subsidize ACFs. Firms such as Microsoft,
    Dell, Qualcomm, and America Online will pay up to 100 percent of a resident's
    monthly bill, but there is a catch. ISPs, for instance, require residents to sign
    service contracts lasting a year or more. Microsoft, meanwhile, prohibits the
    installation of any competitive software, while Priceline requires that residents
    buy shares of its stock, which seems onerous but saves residents on lavatory
    tissue.

    HOW OLD MUST I BE TO HAVE SOMEONE COMMITTED?

    Until very recently, you had to be 18 or older to legally commit a family member.
    However, the now famous British court case Frazier vs. Frazier and Frazier has
    cleared the way for minors to commit their parents. In that case, 15-year-old
    Bradley Frazier of Leicester had his 37 year old parents committed to an ACF In
    Bournemouth after a judge ruled Ian and Janet Frazier were a "danger to
    themselves and the community." According to court records, Bradley told
    his parents about the I Love You virus and warned them not to click
    attachments, then the next day his parents received an I Love You email and
    clicked on the attachment because, they explained, "it came from someone we
    know."

    WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR IN AN ACF?

    First, make sure it's a genuine Assisted Computing Facility, and not an Assisted
    Living Facility. To tell the difference, observe the residents. If they look rather
    old and tend to openly discuss bowel movements, this is probably ³assisted living.²
    On the other hand, if they vary in age and say things like, "I'm supposed to figure
    that out? I'm not Bill (Censored) Gates you know!" this is probably ³assisted
    computing.² Also, at a well-run ACF, residents should lead full, independent lives,
    and should be allowed the use of many technology devices, including telephones,
    electric toothbrushes, and alarm clocks. However, only a facility's Licensed
    Techcare Professionals (LTPs) should perform computational or technological
    tasks such as installing programs or saving email attachments. And LTPs should
    NEVER answer residents' questions because studies have shown that answering
    user questions inevitably makes things worse. Instead, residents should simply
    have things done for them, relieving them of the pressure to "learn" or "improve."

    CAN A RESIDENT EVER GET OUT?

    NO!

    OK, THIS SOUNDS PROMISING. HOW CAN I LEARN MORE?

    For your enlightenment, we offer extensive information on Silicon Pines and
    the ACF lifestyle, which can be found by clicking one of the links in the navigation
    bars found at both the top and bottom of this page. But whatever you decide,
    keep in mind that due to demand, ACFs now have long waiting lists. WebTV and
    AOL users alone will take years to absorb.
     
  12. Bible Believing Bill

    Bible Believing Bill
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    ROFL [​IMG]

    That is GREAT Helen. I better get on the waiting list now so that when technology passes me by I'll have a place waiting for me.

    Bill
     
  13. rsr

    rsr
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    Supposedly, there's a story from a tech support line that goes like this:

    Caller: My cupholder doesn't work any more.

    Tech: Cupholder? We don't install cupholders. You must have got it as a promotional item, and we don't have anything to do with that.

    Caller: No, it was on the computer when it arrived. It worked for a while, and now it doesn't.

    Tech: Well, what does it look like.

    Caller: It's right in the computer, and it has a button on it, and "CD" is printed on the little tray ...
     
  14. Bro. Curtis

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    I have an atheist friend at work who's argument for evolution includes his idea that mankind is getting smarter & smarter. "Weve invented computers!!!" he said.

    I am an electronics applications technologist by trade. 90% of my job is going around re-booting computers that have locked up, stopping test equipment. I went thru 4 years of school to do this. We lose hundreds of dollars each shift due to windows errors.

    I found some humorous about bone-head tech support nightmares...

    http://rinkworks.com/stupid/cs_stuptech.shtml

    Ain't science grand ?
     
  15. Sularis

    Sularis
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    Ernie? its sounds more like you were scammed! Unless you mistyped something; I would really argue you were scammed huge

    Was your hard drive working fine before you took it in? Unless you got one of those "freaks" I've only read about

    Also Your Cd drives have nothing to do with Hard Drive only motherboard.

    There could have been the following problems
    1. Your "jumper" settings were off"
    2. Your CMOS / OS could have been not capable of handling that device
    3. They gave you ALL the drivers which overlap some other drivers and you reinstalled over some drivers needed for HD and other pieces of software.
    4. Your motherboard was bad

    That kind of fraud happens a lot - store overclocking machines in order to charge more. Installing beta or "upgraded" OS. INstalling OLD CMOS' that are incapable of handling expansions or the lastest technology. Double-spacing in order to pretend the drive is twice as big as it really is. Also playing with the Ram. Installing substandard parts replacing name brands with knock-offs. Not giving you a copy of the OS, and driver disks.

    I will never touch an AMD chip again - they have yet to impress me with their performance; and other then virus scanning, firewalls, and video games, I really dont demand much out of my machine.

    I've worked with computers with physical damage to the motherboard, motherboards that went through electrical shock, etc.... In all those cases the motherboards still functioned enough to SLOWLY pull off all the data on the drive, except the stuff over the size of a floppy disk. Even then the physically damaged motherboard, allowed me to multi-disk Winzip/Pkzip everything off.

    He He work at an amusement park but got diploma and certificates in Computers. Got a few certificates from the Church of Christ online courses - despite theological differences.

    Even have experience in computer field [​IMG]

    Anyone willing to put me up? I'll keep yer computer humming, and deliver theology lessons aimed at Young Adults or Teens [​IMG]
     
  16. Ernie Brazee

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    Sularis, I agree with you 100%. Just tired of trying to argue with idiots. Went to the same place with a brand new Western hard drive and they pulled the same thing, this time i caught them in there game of trying to sell hard drives.. The one they installed was under warranty, they used the "need to be returned" thing to keep the hard drive outa my hands so I wouldn't catch on to thier game. Now looking for new tech to service my 'puter.

    Ernie

    [ May 04, 2002, 12:30 PM: Message edited by: Ernie Brazee ]
     
  17. rsr

    rsr
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    Ernie:
    Installing a CDR could affect your hard drive.

    Did the CDR replace another CD-ROM?

    I don't know how many times I've got the cables wrong when using two drives on the same cable. (And I've built a couple dozen machines).

    It could be something as simple as that.

    Now, my favorite stupid computer trick was when I was building a machine and could not, by any stretch, get the video to come up.

    It took a day or so for me to remember that I had installed an old video card in a slot to make sure the slots and the openings on the back lined up -- and I hadn't noticed I'd left it in because I thought it was a serial card. Took the old video out and, sure enough, the thing worked just right.

    Then again, there's the time I plugged the power into the wrong slot on the motherboard and made sparks fly and insulation melt. Board still works, though.
    ;)
     
  18. Bible Believing Bill

    Bible Believing Bill
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    Don't even talk to me about hard drives. :mad:

    My first computer was a Packard Bell (I know that was the first mistake) it died on me and with out boring you with the long sob story, after many months I got PB to replace the system. They sent it to the local repair shop and it had a bad drive in it. That drive got replaced by PB.

    About a year later I couldn't boot up, and I took it to a repair shop and sure enought they told me it was the hard drive. I believe it really was the hard drive because I couldn't get CMOS to even recognize that I had a hard drive installed. Yes I checked all the cables and even replaced the IDE cable to be sure. About a year later the same thing happened. At that point I dumped the Packard Bell, figuring there had to be something that was making hard deives go bad.

    Next I bought a Compaq and a couple of months after the warranty runs out I start to hear what sounds like metal knocking together every time I boot up. Guess what? Its the hard drive. I had that one replaced, and it now been another year and so far so good I still have a working hard dive.

    Bill
     
  19. Don

    Don
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    Pinoy, there are two possibilities: Since I took two actions at the same time, it's hard to say which one was the actual culprit, but I have a really sneaking suspicion....

    First, I deleted a few unnecessary programs. One of those might have been causing a conflict with my internet-accessing programs.

    Second, I ran a "Repair Files" on Internet Explorer. I really, truly believe this is what actually fixed the problem, as this action replaces damaged dll's and other files necessary for Internet Explorer (and therefore, other internet programs) to access the net.

    ----------

    True Tech Support story: Guy at the Help Desk is overheard talking into the phone. "Yes...uh huh...I understand...uh huh...so, when you pick your laptop up, does it still drip water?"
     

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