Selma

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by Zaac, Jan 11, 2015.

  1. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    Really good, timely movie for the things going on in the country right now. Surprising how history seems to be repeating itself and people are saying a lot of the same things, and using a lot of the same excuses now as they tried to use back then.

    [​IMG]

    I thought it was extremely interesting that nothing really "took off" with this movement until white Americans were shown firsthand the depths of the atrocities being brought against Blacks ( in the way of Bloody Sunday on the Edmund Pettis Bridge) of that era simply because they wanted the right to vote.
     
    #1 Zaac, Jan 11, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2015
  2. Scarlett O.

    Scarlett O.
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2002
    Messages:
    9,833
    Likes Received:
    114
    I don't think you can compare back then to now.

    In my opinion it was far worse than those today will ever know. And... Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in his marches and protests and speeches was a all about uniting, not dividing.

    Healing and not pouring salt on the wound.
     
  3. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    I think you misunderstand what Dr. King was about. He was only trying to bring people together to the extent that those in the majority with the power and authority who were contributing to the racism and racial prejudice were willing to acknowledge that their actions were wrong, and were what was really keeping people apart.

    You got the same thing going on right now. If you go back and look at history, white people during that era said the same things about him being divisive that they are saying about the movement today.
     
  4. Scarlett O.

    Scarlett O.
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2002
    Messages:
    9,833
    Likes Received:
    114
    Dr. King fought against a concrete and legally codified oppression. He fought along side people of many colors and background to bring change. His vision wasn't accepted by all and some fought back, but his vision was wide in scope and transcended the reactionary and narrow vision of some today.

    Leaders of "the movement" today such as Al Sharpton are nothing more than instigators of riots and unapologetic liars (remember the girl who falsely claimed that white men had raped her and Al's jumping on that bandwagon?) who want nothing more than to be on television and keep the fires burning.
     
  5. righteousdude2

    righteousdude2
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    10,460
    Likes Received:
    136
    I am so glad you stood up to his general comparision to then and now!

    There is no comparisons, and the most improtant thing to note is, MLK never went through the streets calling for the death of cops and National Guard?

    Have things improved? YES! Is there room for improvement? Most defintely! But, the difference between the days of Selma and the killings in Ferguson and NY are like night and day!

    We are all humans, made of the hand of the Creator, and as long as we continue to live upon this planet where the devil rules and reigns and is free to roam about, there will always be room for change and improvement. And I say this because sin and evil are the order of the day, and that leaves all of us with the hunger to change how we percieve one another and live peacefully with one another.

    I do know heaven will be nothing like this place, and I look forward to that day! :thumbs:
     
  6. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    That's the same thing the current protestors are fighting against. A codified system that allows prosecutors to purposely bypass due process in dealing with cops who kill simply because the prosecutors work with them day in and day out.

    That's the same thing that the current protestors are doing. That's why the protestors are Black, White, Hispanic, Asian and just the full spectrum of the people of which society is made.

    Like the Edmund Pettis bloodiness, the world has seen the injustices broadcast around the world. And like what happened on that bridge in Selma, the world again is saying enough is enough even in the face of those who want to act as though nothing is wrong.

    There's nothing reactionary about the vision today other than a wide range of people finally responding to the killing of all of these unarmed black men.

    The video of Eric Garner being choked and saying he couldn't breathe has reached the farthest corners of the globe just as did that broadcast of the Selma police beating and shooting those people on the Edmund Pettis Bridge.

    [​IMG]

    The people today are marching for the very same respect as human beings that Dr. King marched.


    And one could say the same things about Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh and Bill O'Reilly for being instigators and unapologetic liars.

    What Al Sharpton has done in his past is irrelevant to what the protestors are protesting now. Vilifying Al Sharpton is just a way to not acknowledge that there is a real problem with police killing unarmed black people in this country.

    People did the very same thing to King and Malcolm X and Medgar Evans and many of the other people during the Civil Rights Era who dared to go against the grain.

    They tried to break up the man's family as a way to get him to back down from fighting against the wrongs he was seeing perpetrated by the majority against the minority.

    But the Edmund Pettis Bridge beatings sent it global just as the video of Eric Garner getting choked did.
     
  7. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    And as much as white people in these United States think there is no comparison, go sit in a church with a majority black congregation. Go spend some time in a black owned barbershop. Go spend some time in these black communities and ask them if they see any comparisons between then and now.

    For you see white people who are blinded by privilege thinking there is no comparison is absolutely 100% irrelevant when the folks who were on that bridge in Selma start attesting to the similarities.

    It is 100% irrelevant when the people who witnessed on tv the police brutality of Selma start to speak out about the same sort of police brutality now once again engrained in the world's consciousness through the choking of Eric Garner.

    http://www.cnn.com/2015/01/06/us/selma-then-and-now/


    Again, you saying there is no comparison doesn't mean a hill of beans when the folks who were there see the comparisons. It doesn't mean a hill of beans when the folks who saw Bloody Sunday on tv share that Ferguson and Eric Garner evoke memories of Selma and Bloody Sunday.

    You haven't seen Al Sharpton or any of the people that white people seem to think are the black leaders calling for any cop killings either. But like during MLK Jrs time, there were "leaders" calling for a more radical and violent approach, i.e. Malcolm X.

    Laughable and again irrelevant to many in the black community who immediately make the connection.

    And on behalf of all those people who know crap when I smell, I say it stinks. Like then, a lot of white people aren't trying to change and improve because , like you,a lot of white folks then and now refuse to even admit that there is a problem.

    Looking forward to heaven doesn't excuse our unGodly actions today.



    http://www.buzzfeed.com/alisonwillm...have-made-selma-painfully-relevant#.oh3W3NkGO
     
  8. righteousdude2

    righteousdude2
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    10,460
    Likes Received:
    136
    "...... go sit in a church with a majority black congregation."

    I have not only sat in a black church; I preached regularly in several different black congregations, and I actually loved it, for their spontaneity and enthusiasm for God! There is nothing like an inspired black congregation willing to make a new five minute song out of a phrase in my sermon. I learned to go in with a ten minute message, because it always turned into improvised preaching and singing. LOVED it, loved it, loved IT!

    "Go spend some time in a black owned barbershop."

    Funny you mentioned this. When I worked in Riverside (for 16 years) I always used the black barbershop on the corner! The owner was a vet, who cut hair in the army!

    "Go spend some time in these black communities and ask them if they see any comparisons between then and now."

    I have and they have given me their opinions. Some, like you speak what you speak (not as venomous), and others believe as I say that things are tons better now than yesterday! Those happy with the changes far outnumber you, brother!

    "For you see white people who are blinded by privilege thinking there is no comparison is absolutely 100% irrelevant when the folks who were on that bridge in Selma start attesting to the similarities."

    As are some black folks, like you, blinded by racism of a different kind!

    "It is 100% irrelevant when the people who witnessed on tv the police brutality of Selma start to speak out about the same sort of police brutality now once again engrained in the world's consciousness through the choking of Eric Garner."

    It is time you get beyond your Rev. Al, speaking points, Zaac. Your anger and pungent tone are growing old, fast!

    "Again, you saying there is no comparison doesn't mean a hill of beans when the folks who were there see the comparisons."

    And you think your continued racist vitriol does not add up to a larger hill of beans? You are kidding yourself, as usual!

    "You haven't seen Al Sharpton or any of the people that white people seem to think are the black leaders calling for any cop killings either."

    The dead cop chants came out of Sharpton's speech that weekend afternoon in Brooklyn!

    ".... Malcolm X..... "

    You are correct ... but I think the majority of black folks are glad the country didn't follow Maclom's hateful rants.

    "Laughable and again irrelevant to many in the black community who immediately make the connection."

    What's laughable is your attempts to take over this board with militant rants, and anger. Christianity, true Christianity would not accept such militant leadership, or ugly racist rhetoric!

    And on behalf of all those people who know crap when I smell, I say it stinks.

    Moderators: are you now allowing this form of language to be used? It is cussing at it's best, and would not be allowed in a church pulpit!

    "....like you,a lot of white folks then and now refuse to even admit that there is a problem."

    I admit there is a problem ... and the problem is with black militants like yourself!

    "Looking forward to heaven doesn't excuse our unGodly actions today."

    If you are not looking forward to an eternal change ... what are you doing on a Christian board and forum???

    That is a sad statement coming from a believer .... but the truth is, people who claim to not be looking forward to eternity, are probably those not on the narrow path but rather the wide road, or freeway to hell!

    There are choices ... and even those who are terminally ill, don't go around saying they can't wait to get that new body and be free of the cancerous one they are loaned while they walk this earth. There are people of all colors, and I know them, that are looking forward to the day when there will be no racism, or being looked at because of their social or ethnicity or background.

    A very good brother, who now lives and preaches in Africa told me that "being born white or black or brown or yellow is part of this temporary life." He went on to say, "the best part to life is yet to come!" You see, like me, we believe in heaven there will be no color codes or barriers.

    Get with the program. This life is short. And if you were somehow shorted in this life, the one coming will be more than worth the wait.
     
    #8 righteousdude2, Jan 12, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2015
  9. carpro

    carpro
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    20,897
    Likes Received:
    294

    No relationship or similarities at all to what is happening now.

    Zaac is just up to his usual race baiting. That's the sole purpose of the topic.

    Stop feeding his racist vitriol.
     
    #9 carpro, Jan 12, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2015
  10. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    I didn't ask you about better. We're talking about making the comparison. And like I said, John Lewis and others who were actually on the Edmund Pettis Bridge are making the comparison.

    I'd trust their appraisal of the current situation and its similarities to Selma to be much more weighty than I would the opinions of folks who weren't there.

    The same folks who thought the Civil Rights protests were a nuisance in 1965 are saying the same things about the protests of 2014.

    So again, white privilege may keep some of you blinded, but the world has seen it and knows of the similarities.

    Yet you repeat it and post it in big red letters? You're hilarious.

    Now we're really sounding like the 60s. I need to get me an afro wig and a black glove.



    If you're not acting like a Christian, what are you doing on one? If the racial prejudice and racism permeated by some of you on this board on a regular basis passes for Christian behavior, then God help us.

    Dude, you can make up fake stuff all you want to make it look like I've said something I have not. It won't dissuade me from speaking truth.
     
  11. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    Plenty of similarities to what is happening right now.

    Gosh, back in the 60s , Dr. King and every person who called racism and racial prejudice out for what it was, was called hateful and a whole lot of other names.

    I won't lose any sleep over it. :laugh:
     
  12. blackbird

    blackbird
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2002
    Messages:
    11,898
    Likes Received:
    2
    In Evangelist Billy Graham's autobiography---he gives reference to one of his earliest crusade efforts that took place in Los Angelos

    According to Graham---he and his crusade leaders were walking through the crusade arena prior to the beginning of the first service to be held there----when in the back corner of the arena there was a section that had been roped off

    Dr. Graham asked one of the crusade leaders the meaning of the rope area to which the leader responded

    This is the area where the black people who come are to stand behind

    Dr. Graham thinks for a second or two and then comments

    Take the ropes down or the crusade is off!!!!

    The ropes came down

    The year??

    1949!! The activities that would transpire on the Selma bridge was not even a blip on the radar screen in that year----the majority of the leaders of that event were still in diapers or haven't even been born as of then(save a few like Dr. King who would have been 20 yrs old at the time that Graham was in Los Angelos!! Just wanted to give readers an idea that not all whites fell in to the arena of hate nor were anti-black-----in fact---according to Dr. Graham---Graham himself came to a saving knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ under the preaching of the late, great Mordicai Hamm-----a black preacher of that day!!!
     
    #12 blackbird, Jan 12, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2015
  13. JohnDeereFan

    JohnDeereFan
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    11
    Haven't seen it. Don't plan to.

    I find it ironic that the same black people who praise the movie now are the same black people who have largely abandoned King's principles.
     
  14. blackbird

    blackbird
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2002
    Messages:
    11,898
    Likes Received:
    2
    The late, great Dr. Adrian Rogers was asked how he would respond if there happened to be any black person who attempted to join the church he pastored and in their attempt to join----were shown the door and thrown out

    Here's Dr. Rogers response

    If anyone attempts to throw any person of different color skin than his from the doors of Bellvue Baptist Church of Memphis, Tennessee----he(Dr. Rogers) would be the second person out of the door!!! His wife, Joyce---would be the 3rd!!!
     
  15. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    Loved that man. I got to spend quite a bit of time with him back when I was a young pup. He was also one of my pastor's mentors.
     
  16. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    I'll have to check with them and see. :thumbs:

    But King was just another man that God used. He used Moses. He used Billy Graham and lots of other simple men. Their "principles" weren't monolithic.

    HIS are.

    I find it ironic that the same white people who won't see the movie are the same white people who say there is no comparison between today and Selma.
     
  17. Rolfe

    Rolfe
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    5,295
    Likes Received:
    391
    Is the man in the center (presumably King) the same who was in the series "Spooks"?
     
  18. Rolfe

    Rolfe
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    5,295
    Likes Received:
    391
    "MI:5" in the U.S.
     
  19. Zaac

    Zaac
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    Messages:
    13,757
    Likes Received:
    220
    His name is David Oyelowo, Rolf. He is a British actor. According to his IMDB resume, he played Danny Hunter in MI:5.
     
  20. JonC

    JonC
    Expand Collapse
    Lifelong Disciple
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2001
    Messages:
    6,941
    Likes Received:
    370
    :thumbsup::thumbsup: It is amazing that so many are blind to this observation. I suppose when racism is involved or perceived reason often gives way to emotion. I am looking forward to the movie.
     

Share This Page

Loading...