Seminary

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by Repent-or-Burn, Oct 25, 2009.

  1. Repent-or-Burn

    Repent-or-Burn
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    If I get a BBS(?) MARS ThM and PhD....

    What are the odds, that I could get work as a professor in a good seminary?

    (So that you know what my standards are, of 'good:' I attend an IFB church.)

    Thanks.
     
  2. Martin

    Martin
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    If God calls you to that then you will do fine. However make certain that it is God's call for you. Theology professor openings are few and far between, mainly in this economy. You should also be prepared to travel.

    Most likely you will need the following degrees: B.A. (if you don't already have a B.A. or B.S. degree), an MDiv., then a PhD. Make sure to earn your degrees from regionally accredited institutions (LIST). This is necessary in the world of higher education.

    The ThM is a good degree, but it is an optional step between the MDiv and the PhD (not required). Sort of like the EdS is the step between the M.Ed., and the PhD or Ed.D.. The ThM and EdS are nice degrees to have, but not usually necessary.

    An MA Religious Studies (MARS) degree will normally not get you into a PhD program unless it qualifies as an equivalent. That usually means more than 60hrs, a certain amount of hours in Greek and Hebrew, etc.

    As always, pray and plan out things in advance. Don't get a degree that you later discover will not meet your goals.

    I will pray for you as you make this decision.
     
    #2 Martin, Oct 25, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 25, 2009
  3. Deacon

    Deacon
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    I’m reminded about a commercial about autism that goes something like this:

    One in 10 high school students play baseball.

    1 in 5000 students play college ball.

    1 in 100,000 play professional baseball.

    1 in a million win the World Series (unless you live in Philadelphia).

    One in 250 have autism -------- (I'm making up the numbers)


    A full-time college professorship is like playing in the World Series.

    Of course, you can’t play unless you try.
    And if you’re blessed in the trying then you’ve already won the game.

    Rob
     
  4. Repent-or-Burn

    Repent-or-Burn
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    Appreciate the replies.

    Despite the low odds, I might try for it any way. I cannot stand the thought of working a secular job my whole life, unless I have to. It is so futile.

    Martin, does it matter what subject I choose for the bachelors? By the way you wrote that, it does not.
     
    #4 Repent-or-Burn, Oct 25, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 25, 2009
  5. Salty

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  6. Martin

    Martin
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    Not if you are going into an MDiv program. However you probably want to enter a field that has some relevancy. Programs such as history, education, religion, or sociology are usually good fits. However if you are going to a secular university I would not advise the religion major. Earning your undergraduate degree in education would not be a bad idea. That way you would have something to "fall back on" while working on your MDiv/PhD and if the professor job does not work out (LINK). If you want to be a theology professor at a seminary then I would also recommend you get as much real world ministry experience as possible.

    I don't know your age (or situation, etc) however Liberty University has a great undergraduate program online and oncampus (LINK). Of course, if you are under 21 and just starting out I would strongly urge the on-campus options.
     
  7. Repent-or-Burn

    Repent-or-Burn
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    =====
    ""fall back on""
    =====
    My safety net is driving... OTR, local pizza, whatever. (Dominos {snip} big time. Basically, he didn't give me the hours I signed up for.)



    ===
    "Of course, if you are under 21"
    ===
    I will be 21 by the time I start. I am 20 now.
     
    #7 Repent-or-Burn, Oct 25, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 26, 2009
  8. Dr. Bob

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    One of the last things we need in seminary are people who have "book learnin'" and no real life experience.

    I would encourage any young man to get a BA and then MDiv from Seminary. Then work in a church as you sloooowly finish a ThM and ThD. This will give you BOTH quality training and the real life training.

    Then work 5-10 years in a college-level program. This will put you at 40 years old, about the minimum for an "elder" to be training other elders (imho)
     
  9. Repent-or-Burn

    Repent-or-Burn
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    You have to excuse me, Bob.

    If I am teaching doctrine, or languages, etc... Then, what is the problem with only book learning? (Not to imply that is all I have or would have.)

    To use pragmatism to interpret scripture is deadly.
     
  10. Havensdad

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    I know people are primarily speaking of a full time gig, but what about an adjunct position? I know at Liberty Seminary right now, my Old Testament professor is head of Old Testament studies at the Masters Seminary, LOL, but two of my prof.s so far only had a D.Min.

    Not sure how much you make in such cases, though.
     
  11. Repent-or-Burn

    Repent-or-Burn
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    I wouldn't necessarily be against that.

    ;)
     
  12. Martin

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    ==It depends upon the school. Usually adjuncts don't make that much and have no job security at all. They can be laid off without notice or explanation. Working as an adjunct, however, is a great way to start since it provides some good teaching experience and plenty of good contacts. Many colleges require such experience before they will even consider someone for a full-time position.
     
  13. Peggy

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    It's a looonnnnggg way from being a pizza delivery guy to being a professor. Better start now.

    Also, one thing about learning is that you have to be WILLING to learn - that is you have to have a humble heart. You need to know that you don't know everything. You have to be teachable. A stubborn, dogmatic attitude won't get you very far in school.

    Christ calls for us to have a servant's heart. This is especially true for leaders.

    Mat 20:25 But Jesus called them unto him, and said, Ye know that the princes of the Gentiles exercise dominion over them, and they that are great exercise authority upon them.
    Mat 20:26 But it shall not be so among you: but whosoever will be great among you, let him be your minister;
    Mat 20:27 And whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant:
    Mat 20:28 Even as the Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many.
     

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