Semper Fi

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by thjplgvp, Jan 14, 2016.

  1. thjplgvp

    thjplgvp
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    In the humor section I saw a post in response to my post and could not pass up the opportunity to share a little USMC history.

    To good to pass up the opportunity to communicate a little history. In the early 1880's Marines were being assigned to Naval ships as snipers and ship infantry who when the ships were under attack and were either boarding another vessel or being boarded by the enemy needed a means of identifying officers so they would not get shot one. The quatrefoil which is the emblem today which is embroidered on very top of each officers cover (hat) is how they identified their officers in combat. The symbol looks like the emblem on the old Mason Jars people used for canning. Hence the officers were first referred to as Jarheads and later all marines received the same designation.

    The term Leatherneck was given during the time between 1775 and mid 1800's when a tall strip of thick leather was fit to the Marines neck accomplishing two things. It made sure the soldier kept his head erect and secondly prevented injury during sword fights especially in Tripoli (Libya) with the Muslims (Barbary Coast Pirates) who Thomas Jefferson declared war on, where the neck piece was a help to stop beheadings while in combat. In the Marine Corps hymn (to the shores of Tripoli) is a reference to these battles. Hence the leathernecks became a proud identifying name.

    The nick name Devil Dogs was given to the Marines at Belleau Wood in World War I by the Germans for their fighting prowess. I might add the Marines were not allowed to wear their own uniforms during much of that battle as they were assigned to the US Army as a support group.

    For a look at the quatrefoil https://www.google.com/search?safe=....0..0.0....0...1ac..64.img..0.0.0.UiwEdnsGxSE

    thjplgvp
     
    #1 thjplgvp, Jan 14, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016
  2. agedman

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    Shucks, So the proud marines didn't wear the quatrefoil to give snipers an X to shoot at. :)
     
  3. tyndale1946

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    Ah Marine!... You forgot to add this tidbit of why there is red stripe on a Marines Dress Blues and what does it mean?... From Wikipedia The Battle Of Chapultepec... You knew that right?... Brother Glen

    Tradition holds that in the Battle of Chapultepec in September 1847, Marine officers and NCOs sustained an unusually high casualty rate during the battle.[3] In 1849, uniform regulations dictated that the stripes be changed to a solid red. Ten years later, a scarlet cord was inserted into the outer seams for noncommissioned officers and musicians, while a scarlet welt was added for officers. Finally, in 1904, the simple scarlet stripe seen today was adopted, with the varying widths prescribed for different ranks.
     
  4. thjplgvp

    thjplgvp
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    Thank you Tyndale I did not know that. Primarily I was addressing our nick name through the years.

    thjplgvp
     
  5. thjplgvp

    thjplgvp
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    I am sure that in some instances prior to the cover change that is exactly what happened.
    With the invention of grenades and help of foxholes officers had to learn to be careful in combat. :)

    thjplgvp
     
  6. tyndale1946

    tyndale1946
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    Now a Marine wouldn't say that!... Must be a Civilian!... Will make a Marine out of him yet?... DROP DOWN AND GIVE ME TWENTY!... Brother (D.I.) GlenBiggrin
     
  7. tyndale1946

    tyndale1946
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    Thank you for that historical trip down Marine Corp memory lane... Brother Glen
     
  8. HankD

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    I was an "airhead" (Air Force), one of my sons was a "bubblehead" (submariner).

    HankD
     
  9. TCassidy

    TCassidy
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    Well, 7 our of 450. Not what I would call "unusually high casualty rate." :)
     

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