Separation of church and state??? Yikes!!

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by annsni, Nov 12, 2006.

  1. annsni

    annsni
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    I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this - please move it if it needs to be.

    My daughter is 14 and just started back to public school after being homeschooled from 1st through 8th grades. Now in 9th grade, they're studying comparative religions and they saw a video on some religious rituals - placing an offering in front of a small idol, chanting, drums - that kind of thing. Well, she told me that she didn't know why but she started feeling horrible while watching it and then just started crying - that she just felt there was a spiritual thing going on in the room. Yikes!!! So then she tells me that they're going to do meditation in class on Friday - they don't have to participate if they don't want to and they can just sit there but I don't think I want her in the room. My older daughter was sick for that day so she missed it, and I didn't know about it until the day before anyway, but she (my older daughter) said that the teacher was telling them that she'd put a candle in the middle of the room and the kids are to make it move in their mind - move to the left, to the right, towards them, away from them and then darken and get brighter.

    Now, isn't this promoting a religion in school? Jeepers, they can't pray but meditation is awesome and taught in school. I'm going to be writing a letter to the principal and the superintendant and I'm calling my daughter's teacher and telling her that Nicole is NOT to be in the classroom when she's doing this. She can send her to the resource room, the principal's office, the library or anywhere else but she's NOT going to be in a classroom where they're opening themselves up to demons. **SHUDDER** I'm just sick over this. How dare they!!! :BangHead:

    Has anyone ever dealt with this? What did you do??

    Ann
     
  2. Not_hard_to_find

    Not_hard_to_find
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    Age 15 was when my granddaughter, a new Christian, left public school for a Christian school. She had been in public school all of her life. Some did say she was running away from problems in public schools where she could witness, but the difference for her was tremendous. Teachers in the public school could not relate to the discriminatory harrassment she faced, as well as the unbiblical cirriculum. Two families in our church intend to home school through high school.

    You have my prayers, but no solution. It's a very personal decision each family must face.
     
  3. annsni

    annsni
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    Thanks. I know that we're going to stick this out - my girls (I have 2 in the school, one 14 and one 16) are very strong spiritually and are more than happy to fight this out, if need be. I know this school is not very friendly to Christians (friends of mine had to sue to start a Bible club), but they are both wanting to be there as a witness. My older daughter was harassed last year about being a Christian (she wasn't hurt but a boy came, slammed closed her locker as she was standing there and then took all of her books and bag and threw them against the wall telling her "That's because you believe in Jesus.". Poor girl!!

    So, I feel strongly that I have to take up this fight. At LEAST, I'm speaking to the teacher and telling her that Nicole is not to be in the room and that I'm looking into whether this is legal or not (I know it's not but I'll have a lawyer take care of that).

    It's so scary what kids are being taught. God is bad but meditation is great. Bleck!!
     
  4. menageriekeeper

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    It's one thing to show the religious practices of other cultures, it's quite another to promote participating in them.

    Write everyone you can think of, starting with the teacher. One letter copied to teacher, principal, superintendent (don't forget the assistant super in charge of your particular school if there is one) and school board members. Keep your letter strictly professional and keep your emotions out of it! Document your views with your opinion of actual law on religion in the classroom. These can usually be found on the internet. Make sure you include that your child's grades are not to suffer because of her refusal to participate in something that is clearly against her religious views (especially if this is a required class for graduation).

    I'd keep my child home on the grounds of religious freedom at least during that class period. Being sent out of the room is to much like punishment and will draw to much (unwanted) attention to your daughter. While we waited for that class to end, we'd spend some time with a milk shake and some prayers for her classmates who's parent obviously don't know what is going on.

    Don't be surprised if you are told that "no one has ever complained". They probably haven't. 90% of what is wrong in our schools is parents who don't have a clue as to what is really going on inside the school doors.
     
  5. Gold Dragon

    Gold Dragon
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    I agree that with this recommendation. Religious freedom includes not being forced to participate in religious rituals opposed to your religion.

    I wholly support learning about religions in comparative religion class and even observing others practice their religion. But participation should be entirely voluntary and a good teacher would find out the religous backgrounds of the kids and inform their parents of potential activities.

    It sounds like it was voluntary but being in the room is also participation of some religious acts and that should be voluntary as well. An alternative may be to have students who do not wish to participate or be in the room to perform research on a certain ritual and write about it.
     
    #5 Gold Dragon, Nov 13, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 2006
  6. Not_hard_to_find

    Not_hard_to_find
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    Don't forget the resources at ACLJ
     
  7. Scott J

    Scott J
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    As long as the state and in particular the Federal gov't are involved in education directly violating the spirit of the establishment clause... it will always be a matter of whose ox gets gored.

    I would assert that the disclusion of any religious matter is every bit as bad as what was described above. Ignoring God is no more noble than denying Him or His character. Reading the average history text you'd never know how greatly Christians influenced the shape of our laws and culture.
     

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