September - Reading 9

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Aaron, Sep 9, 2002.

  1. Aaron

    Aaron
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  2. Aaron

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    Isaiah 26 is a song of praise for the great salvation of Jehovah. Did you know that "Jesus" means, "Jehovah saves?"

    A verse I can particularly relate to is vs 16:
    Though punished severly because of their sin, when they turned to God he forgave them. It is a legitimate conversion for those to turn away from their sin to the LORD who do so because of severe circumstances. Those who tremble and fear the fires of hell and call out to God, are just as saved as those who began with a heart broken because of their sin.
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

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    Good evening -

    As always, thanks, Aaron.

    I found the prophecy in chapter 24 of Isaiah concerning the devestation of the earth fascinating. Isaiah foresees only a few people left (verse 13) after this cataclysmic event. It will be interesting to compare this to the events seen by John in Revelation leading up to the new Heaven and Earth spoken of in Revelation 21. Chapter 26 of Isaiah also mentions the resurrection of the dead, perhaps an allusion to the rapture spoken of in 1Thessalonians 4:16. Ezekiel also has a vision of the dry bones in the valley having flesh regenerate on them in chapter 37 of his Book.

    In Luke Christ gives the disciples an indication of the time to come after His arrest. One of the verses that always strikes me at this point is 22:36 where Christ instructs His disciples to purchase a sword if they do not have one. The disciples may have misread His intention when they enthusiastically produce two swords, thinking that now was the time for a militant response to the impending arrest. Christ stays their efforts in verse 38 and even admonishes Peter later in the story for his use of a sword against a servant (22:51). As Christians we are to be self-reliant and defend ourselves. We are not lambs for the slaughter. However, it is not proper for us to be the aggressors.

    In Hebrews 6 the basic principles, or "milk", of Christianity are listed.
    [1] repentance
    [2] faith
    [3] instructions in baptism
    [4] laying of hands
    [5] the ressurection
    [6] eternal judgment

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

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    Proverbs

    Sunday School lecture - 2/1/04

    Proverbs 22:17- Proverbs 24

    This week we move into a new section of the Book of Proverbs entitled by many scholars as "Instruction in 30 Sayings." It is also referred to as "The Words of the Wise." Unlike the Wisdom sentences of 10:1 - 22:16, the literary style returns primarily to Instructional proverbs as in chapters 1-9.

    Proverbs 22:17- 22:21

    This prologue to the section opens with a demand for attention. Verse 18 supplies the motivation to the pupil in that if he keeps these teachings within him and ready to speak, he will have pleasant consequences. In verse 19 we see once again that the objective of as well as the source of these teachings is Yahweh, the Lord.
     
    #4 Clint Kritzer, Sep 9, 2004
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  5. Clint Kritzer

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    Luke

    Sunday School lesson 1/16/05 - conclusion

    Luke 22:31-34 The Prediction of Peter’s Denial

    The repetition of “Simon, Simon” indicates solemnity and deep concern over the words to come. This picture of Satan is like that in Job where he is pictured as an accuser and one who attempts to destroy the faith of men. However, that Satan had to demand from God shows that evil is not ultimate in the universe. Satan only receives what faculties God allows. It should be noted that the word “you” in verse 31 is plural, being addressed to all the Disciples. The loyalty of all Twelve would be tested that night.

    Against the demands of Satan are placed the prayers of Jesus. However, one should not get the distorted view that God is some distant Being who has Satan demanding on one side and Jesus praying on the other. Christ is an advocate for men who are weak and sinful and does not abandon them in their hour of need. Jesus had prayed for Simon (singular you) as he would be the instrument who would strengthen the other Disciples. Simon’s faith would be required of him to accomplish this task and would make him publicly acknowledge Christ when it was costly to do so. Simon’s denial would be temporary. He would renew his commitment and be the first be confronted by the risen Lord and grasp the reality of the Resurrection. Yet Jesus refers to the other Disciples as “brethren.” There is no hierarchy among them but it is familial. All of us are children of God and all on equal standing in Christ.

    Peter protests at this prediction as he states he is willing to go to prison or death for Jesus. Indeed, Peter would face prison in the Book of Acts on a few occasions but this was after he fully understood the implications of the Kingdom. As of now, he is still dominated by his concepts of earthly power and greatness. Had there been a fight in the garden, Peter would have indeed faced prison and death. The subtlety of the Messiah going to the cross, however, did not fit his mold.

    The cock’s crow may have been a literal rooster marking dawn but it has also been conjectured that it was the bugle call for the Roman garrison marking the beginning of the third watch at about 3:00 am.

    Luke 22:35-38 Instructions to the Disciples

    This particular Passage occurs only in Luke. It is a contrast to the earlier missions of the Twelve in chapter 9 and the seventy in chapter 10 in which they were sent out with no provisions. Now due to Satan’s renewed activity, the situation has changed and it is necessary that the disciples be ready to face hostility. Jesus tells them to supply themselves with provisions and even to obtain a sword, even if they have to sell their mantle, the outer garment that served as coat and bed, to get one.

    This verse is not easily interpreted as Jesus had taught a rather pacifistic philosophy of turning the other cheek and suffering for righteousness. The Disciples would now be entering a life of travel now where wild beast and robbers could prey on them. For this commentator, personally, I view this verse looking beyond Gathsemene and as an instruction that we are not lambs for the slaughter. Being robbed because of a lack of self-defense is not suffering for righteousness. It is merely suffering.

    Jesus would be “reckoned with transgressors,” a quote from Isaiah. He would be executed as a rebel leader and as was the custom of that time and now, the followers of rebel leaders are also hunted down. This was why Peter denied Jesus that night.

    When the Disciples tell Him that they have two swords, he repllies, “That is enough.” Again, this is a difficult phrase to interpret. Some theories are that it meant that two swords were sufficient: they were not to become a militant army. Another suggestion is that Jesus was saying, “That is enough talk about swords.” Still another is that the remark should be read as sarcastic meaning, “Big deal, two swords. You’re very equipped, aren’t you?”
     
    #5 Clint Kritzer, Sep 9, 2005
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  6. Clint Kritzer

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    Hebrews

    Hebrews 6:1-12 Crucifying Christ Again

    A foundation is unquestionably an important part of a house. Without a proper foundation a house will fail. However, once a foundation has been established there is no need to build it again. Once it is laid, the builder is ready for the rest of the structure. The foundation is an important part of the house, but it is not the only part of the house.

    The Christian Hebrews had their foundation. It was laid with the spiritual milk they had so long stayed with. Now it was time to move forward with the construction of the structure of the house. It was time to frame their theology and make it worthy of a house of God.

    The preacher has named six elements of the foundation on which the structure would be razed.
    • Repentance from dead works. In many of the Books of Prophecy the Jews had been warned that sacrifice without sincerity was an offense to God. Christianity with Christ as the Sacrifice no longer relied on works.
    • The doctrine of Faith towards God. It is an elemental truth that faith is the vehicle through which we receive God’s Grace. It is through faith that we have open communication with Him.
    • The doctrine of Baptism. This rite was what brought the individual members of the faith together as one with Christ. He had been baptized and commanded baptism.
    • The laying of Hands. In the primitive church the laying of hands was used for new conversions during prayer for the Holy Spirit to enter. It was also used for commissioning missionaries and for the appointment of deacons and elders.
    • The doctrine of Resurrection. This element was often a key focus of Paul’s. Christianity is a religion that recognizes the immortality of the soul and the eventual resurrection of the dead.
    • The doctrine of Judgment. Christianity also recognizes the fact that all members of the human race will eventually be judged on their faith and then rewarded for their works if applicable. Also, God’s judgment carried far more weight than man’s.

    Without these basic elements of doctrine forming a foundation, there is no way a structure calling itself a church will stand as a house of God.

    At this juncture, the preacher begins to address the real problem in the Hebrew church. Because of a lack of maturity and a refusal to build upon their basic doctrines, some of the members were considering abandoning the foundation.

    It is difficult to not take a position on this particular point of the Scriptures as it seems to be a direct affront to the doctrine of Eternal Security, or, Once Saved, Always Saved. This has put commentators and interpreters on edge for centuries. The authors of the KJV went so far as to insert the word “if” in verse 6 rather than the more literal “having fallen away” in order to soften the blow. There are a myriad of other Passages that can be used to support the doctrine of Eternal Security but Hebrews 6:6 stands as a warning that no single act of man is worthy of salvation. Faith as a system of life must be practiced with earnestness from the day of conversion until death. They fell away but were renewed. It is not my purpose to solve the debate this day but we must consider, can one lose one’s salvation? Believe that you can’t; live like you can.

    More importantly to the Passage at hand, the author states that it is impossible for a Christian who has turned apostate to be renewed again! To desert Jesus after being enlightened, tasting the goodness of the word of God, and partaking of the Holy Spirit (does this describe only Christians?) is to crucify Him again and hold Him up to contempt. That is to say by turning from the Christian system as a whole and rejecting our Lord, one puts oneself in the same position as those who demanded His execution. The apostate ridicules Christ as the soldiers did before they nailed Him to the cross.

    It should be stated here that even the first act of repentance leading to a person’s salvation is a miracle. To save a depraved and corrupt individual is, by definition, impossible. Perhaps the preacher had in mind the Disciples during the Passion. They had been as near to Christ as anyone but they abandoned Him in that dark day.

    The preacher’s audience lived in a time when anything could have happened to the Christian community. Many of the New Testament authors warn against denying Christ even if it means saving one’s own life. If we place our physical lives above our eternal reward, then Jesus is not our Lord.

    To illustrate his point, the preacher makes an analogy of rain on the land. All land receives some rain. Some land then brings forth fruit and is therefore considered blessed by God. Other land produces thorns and thistles, it is useless, hostile and near to being cursed. The preacher’s point is that he considers his audience worthy and capable of producing fruit.

    The Passage ends far more optimistically. The preacher, who is characteristically not very personal, refers to his audience as “beloved.” This is the only occurrence of the term in this Book. Though they had not matured, there was still a love for god within them and upon that basic tenant great things could happen. They may have been considering apostasy, but they had not fallen yet.

    The love of God still showed through in the care they gave their brothers. They likely helped the poor and the widows. The foundation they clung to was secure and strong. If they were now ready for meat, the preacher was ready to give it to them.
     
  7. Clint Kritzer

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