Should Baptist Seminaries Admit Non-Baptists

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by Martin, Jul 9, 2005.

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Should Baptist Seminaries Admit Non-Baptists

  1. Yes. As long as they believe the Bible.

    87.5%
  2. No. If they believed the Bible they would be Baptists.

    5.0%
  3. No. We should stick with our own.

    2.5%
  4. No. Allowing non-Baptist students is compromise

    5.0%
  5. I Have No Clue.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Martin

    Martin
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    Should a Baptist seminary (such as Southeastern, Liberty, Temple, etc) admit non-Baptist students as long as those students are Bible believing Christians?
     
  2. RandR

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    I voted yes.
     
  3. Pipedude

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    A school needs to have its own identity and to assert it strongly. Aliens are welcome so long as they behave themselves; that is, they need to refrain from things that would affect the ethos that the Baptists have established.

    Would that make the aliens uncomfortable? They are free to leave. Would that make them second-class citizens? Yes, and that should be expected by those who disbelieve what the school was founded to teach.

    I have been an alien at every school I attended. I expected no concessions and got none.
     
  4. StefanM

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    My answer isn't in the poll.

    I say yes, but to restrict to "Bible believing" students might be difficult. I'd limit it to professed Christians of any variety.
     
  5. Pastor Larry

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    Not many good answers there. The question is, Why would they?
     
  6. StefanM

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    Why not expose students of other denominations to the teaching that one considers correct?
     
  7. GARick

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    I attend a Baptist Seminary and am a member of a nondenominational (and seeker-friendly at that) church. Three aspects of my experience come to mind in regard to Martin’s query:

    1. The Seminary catalog makes it clear that the institution and faculty support and adhere to SBC doctrine. But that paragraph is immediately followed with, “However, the right of the student to affiliate with another evangelical denomination is respected.”

    2. The Student’s Doctrinal Statement and Standards of Conduct which must be committed to as part of the admissions process would seem to eliminate any who were not “Bible believing.”

    3. Faculty members are individuals and, as such, my non-denominationalism and seeker-friendliness are respected more by some than others. And yes, when the message of the first chapel I attended was strongly anti-seeker-friendly, I felt somewhat like a second-class citizen…but I got over it.

    Having shared all that, my belief is that the Body is made up of ALL who have accepted Christ as their savior and thus I voted "Yes."
     
  8. Pastor Larry

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    I am all for that, but seminary is not the place to do that. Seminary is hte place to train men for the ministry. I would do what you suggest in a local church.

    Some Baptist seminaries may let others in. I am not saying they shouldn't necessarily. I am saying Why would they? If our purpose is to train Baptist pastors, why wouldn't we do everything possible to do that?
     
  9. dianetavegia

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    If a man doesn't agree with the Baptist Faith and Message, I don't think they should be allowed to attend a Baptist Seminary.

    I had a J/W tell me 'we're all Christians'. Where do you draw the line? I voted NO. Compromise.
     
  10. StefanM

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    My line would be orthodox Christianity. I don't see allowing individuals to attend seminary classes as an endorsement of their theology. You can always do what the SBC seminaries do--have a different tuition rate for non-SBCers.
     
  11. StefanM

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    IMO, most Baptist seminaries would not state that the purpose of seminary is to train Baptist pastors.

    Lay ministers, parachurch organization directors/employees, professors, etc. can all be trained in seminaries.
     
  12. StefanM

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    I went ahead and voted "yes" so that I could see the results.
     
  13. JonathanDT

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    Yes, yes, yes. Every wall dividing the denominations unnecessarily should be torn down.
     
  14. PastorSBC1303

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    I agree.
     
  15. Rhetorician

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    Martin,

    I would vote "YES."

    But, I think that they should be charges such a high rate of tuition by the SBC "Big Six" that it would be sooooooooooo expensive that only those who wanted a Baptist persuasion would come at all.

    My two cents worth!

    sdg!

    rd
     
  16. StefanM

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    Why make the charges prohibitively high? You could make them higher (but not too high) and use the extra money to subsidize the Baptist students, making it easier to train Baptist ministers.
     
  17. TaterTot

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    The seminary I went to (and I am not a "man" :eek: ) does allow non SBCers, but at a higher tuition rate. (The Cooperative Program defrays some of the cost for SBC students, and it woldnt be right to do so for students who aren't giving back ion some way to the Convention) Some denominations do not have noted scholars, so why deny students to opportunity to learn from the best? [​IMG] We as SBCers learn from scholars of outher Denominations as well. Its a Kingdom thing.
     
  18. Pastor Larry

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    I agree with this, and would emphasize unnecessarily. Denominations exist for a reason.
     
  19. JohnAMac

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    Is a Baptist seminary exclusively for the purpose of training for ministry in a Baptist church? In my community, the pastor of the Assembly of God, one of the Presbyterian pastors and both of the non-denominational pastors all went to Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, and the Methodist pastor is working on his doctorate there now. On the other hand, the largest Southern Baptist church in town has a pastor who attended Dallas Theological Seminary, which isn't Baptist, at least one of the other Southern Baptist pastors went to Fuller Theological Seminary (which I think is Presbyterian??) and then there's me. I don't get paid for being the pastor, though I do the preaching and the work of pastoral ministry in my church, and I didn't go to a Baptist seminary, either. Go figure.

    Personally, as the denominational lines in the American Christian community continue to blur, which I think is a good thing, seminary choice will depend more and more on convenience of location and programs offered, and less on denominational affiliation.
     
  20. mcdirector

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    I think that anyone who professes a belief in Jesus and agrees to adhere to the policies of the seminary should be allowed to come. That's the line to draw. Well, those things and the ability to pay tuition. :D

    If someone goes to a Baptist seminary and has an agenda that doesn't fit the seminary policies, I'd think that would show up eventually, and he/she could be sent on their merry way to find another.

    What an honor for Baptist seminaries to train men and women to serve in other denominations.

    BTW, my son is at SWTS and I greatly appreciate the help he gets from the Cooperative Program and NC Baptists!
     

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