So what are you reading?

Discussion in 'Books / Publications Forum' started by Deacon, Mar 4, 2016.

  1. Deacon

    Deacon
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    What are you reading now?
    Why does it interest you?
    What have you learned?
    Is it enjoyable?
     
  2. Revmitchell

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    The Pastor in Prayer Charles Spurgeon

    There is no bigger need in our churches.

    Yes
     
  3. JonC

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    Purity of Heart is to Will One Thing, by Søren Kierkegaard

    It is interesting. Elsewhere I'm looking at a topic that Kierkegaard deals with in this book (drawing near to God and the double mindedness of James 4:8).


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    #3 JonC, Mar 4, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2016
  4. Crabtownboy

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    1. To Kill a Mockingbird
    2. The Big Red Train Ride
    3. The Forgotten Soldier
     
  5. JonC

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    My son and I were just talking about "To Kill a Mockingbird." He's reading the Outsiders and we were comparing what I read in school.
     
  6. Crabtownboy

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    Is The Outsiders required reading for your son. Just curious.
     
  7. JonC

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    Yes (7th grade).

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  8. Crabtownboy

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    Very interesting. I have not read the book, but from a bit of research I've done today I think it is probably a good book to read and for you to discuss with him.

    Is "To Kill a Mockingbird" required reading in his school system? If so, at what level?

     
  9. JonC

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    I always thought it interesting that Hinton started writing the book when she was 15 or 16 years old, it was published (if I remember correctly) when she was 18.

    And yes, To Kill a Mockingbird is still required reading here in high school. I think it's 11th grade, but not sure.

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  10. JonC

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    I misspoke. To kill a mocking bird is 9th grade requires reading.

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  11. Crabtownboy

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    No, I do not think you misspoke. I was just curious. I would have been a bit surprised if To Kill a Mockingbird had been on the list for the 7th grade. Of course I do not know all the books on the list, but it seems there are worthwhile books that teach important lessons on the list. Thanks for the replies.
     
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  12. tyndale1946

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    I just finished The Revenant... This is definitely a mans book and am now reading Jesus On Trial by David Limbaugh who is Rush Limbaugh's brother... Picked it up at Costco where I also bought The Revenant... The Life And Times of Jesus The Messiah and Sketches of Jewish Social Life both by Alfred Edersheim... Also finished Old Testament Bible History also by Edersheim... Reading Gleaning In Exodus online by Pink and have coming in the mail The Emmaus Code by David Limbaugh... This is in reference to the two that Jesus met on the road to Emmaus and how he opened the scriptures relating to him... Looking forward to reading that!... Other than that don't recall if I ever read To Kill A Mocking Bird... It was an outstanding movie, does seeing the movie count?... Brother Glen
     
  13. Deacon

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  14. ReformedBaptist

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    The Mortified Christian: A treatise on the mortification of sin. - Christopher Love (1618-1651) published by Soli Deo Gloria.

    Jesus Christ: The history, ceremony, prophecy as told in the Old Testament. This is published by World Classic Reference Library and is basically a series of sermons on the above topic by C.H. Spurgeon on how Christ appears in the Old Testament.

    The Christian on the Mount: A treatise on Meditation. - Thomas Manton (1620-1686) published by The Northhampton Press.
     
  15. Crabtownboy

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  16. JonC

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    That looks interesting, CTB. I plan on getting this one (let me know how you like it).
     
  17. Crabtownboy

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    It is quite interesting. I downloaded it from my public library.
     
  18. Crabtownboy

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    On My Own by Diane Rehm.

    Diane wrote a deeply personal and moving account of the long drawn-out death (from Parkinson’s) of her husband of fifty-four years, and of her struggle to reconstruct her life without him.
     
  19. Crabtownboy

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    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith.

    Neither Here Nor There by Bill Bryson
     
  20. Crabtownboy

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    An Owl On Every Post by Sanora Babb

    This is a fascinating read, the true story of Sanora Babb growing up on an isolated homestead in Colorado. Below is part of a review of this book that was posted on Amaon.

    Sanora Babb experienced pioneer life in a one-room dugout, eye-level with the land that supported, tormented and beguiled her; where her family fought for their lives against drought, crop-failure, starvation, and almost unfathomless loneliness. Learning to read from newspapers that lined the dugout's dirt walls, she grew up to be a journalist, then a writer of unforgettable books about the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl, most notably Whose Names Are Unknown.

    The author was seven when her parents began to homestead an isolated 320-acre farm on the western plains. She tells the story through her eyes as a sensitive, fearless young girl who came to love the wind, the vastness, the mystery and magic in the ordinary.

    This evocative memoir of a pioneer childhood on the Great Plains is written with the lyricism and sensitivity that distinguishes all of Sanora Babb's writing. An Owl on Every Post, with its environmental disasters, extreme weather, mortgage foreclosures, and harsh living conditions, resonates as much today as when it first appeared. What this true story of Sanora's prairie childhood reveals best are the values--courage, pride, determination, and love--that allowed her family to prevail over total despair.
     

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