Social Security payments to shrink for senior...

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by tinytim, Aug 23, 2009.

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  1. tinytim

    tinytim
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    Bailing out Wall Street.. Bailing out GM and Chrysler.. Bailing out everyone else..

    ON the Backs of the elderly!!!

    Do our Politicians have no shame!!!

    VOTE EM OUT!!!!
    . ALL!... don't vote for someone that voted for the Bailouts...

    Now the elderly will have less to live on, while the thieves in congress gets raises!...

    VOTE EM OUT!.. That should be the theme chant for next yr's elections.

    Now this makes me ANGRY… TOWNHALL ANGRY !!! And I dare some lilly livered liberal snitch to pass this on to Obama’s secret fishy snitch police…

    The Greatest Generation ever needs more respect than this….


    Read this if you dare! http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/08/23/national/main5260253.shtml?tag=stack

    (AP) Millions of older people will face shrinking Social Security checks next year, the first time in a generation that payments would not rise.

    The trustees who oversee Social Security are projecting there won't be a cost of living adjustment (COLA) for the next two years. That hasn't happened since automatic increases were adopted in 1975.

    By law, Social Security benefits cannot go down. Nevertheless, monthly payments would drop for millions of people in the Medicare prescription drug program because the premiums, which often are deducted from Social Security payments, are scheduled to go up slightly.

    "I will promise you, they count on that COLA," said Barbara Kennelly, a former Democratic congresswoman from Connecticut who now heads the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. "To some people, it might not be a big deal. But to seniors, especially with their health care costs, it is a big deal."
     
  2. tinytim

    tinytim
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    2 hours and no response to this post...

    This should outrage every Senior Citizen out there, their kids, and grandkids...

    Where is the outrage that the elderly that are barely getting by, will have even less money for 2 yrs straight?
     
  3. carpro

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    It all fits. The elderly are also the first targets of decreased coverage, no coverage and rationing under Obamacare.

    Look at how much money liberals will have to spend on killing babies if they can kill off part of the elderly population first.

    Money is only part of the equation. Re-allocation of resourses is the other.
     
  4. tinytim

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    Don't libbies get old? Some libbies are missing 1 fry short of a happy meal.
     
  5. carpro

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    Victims of "friendly fire".

    All for the greater good, as any self respecting liberal will tell you.

    Remember "Logan's Run" and "Soylent Green"? We may see it come to pass if liberals get their way.
     
  6. billwald

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    WELL, SS payments SHOULD shrink when the cost of living decreases. So might my state pension. Big deal.
     
  7. Salty

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    The way I read the story, SS will not shrink - just no pay raise - which in effect is a pay loss due to inflation including Medicaid premiums going up.
     
  8. tinytim

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    Which means less money to spend on what they choose to spend it on...

    So their checks will be less than what they are getting now.
     
  9. donnA

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    In Feburary my mom chose to spend her check on her a $700. heating bill. She counts on those yearly raises. For someone like here the real choice is heat or food. I give her our food, I give her money, I stop and buy her stuff she needs, but realistically, if I want to pay my rent and bills I can't help her a whole lot.
     
  10. TC

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    Where is the cost of living shrinking? Here rent is going up, utilities (electricity, heat, ect.) are going up, groceries are going up. It is getting more expensive to live - not cheaper.
     
  11. donnA

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    Cost of livng is not going down, anywhere, those living in the real world would know this. Food and supplies are up every month here, mom's heating is going to cost as much or more this winter. Other utilities are up also.
    So just where is cost of living going down, just where is the recession getting better, because it isn't in the everyday lives of people in this country.
     
  12. Tom Bryant

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    So is the cost of living decreasing where you live, Bill? Certainly not where I live.

    I am 58. Every year I get a notice that my retirement age has gone up. I understand that because life span is going up and I have no real desire to retire.

    But, the deal when I got in was 65. Now it is at least 68. The federal governmant cannot keep SS solvent. They keep changing the rules. And then the left thinks that they will keep their promises about health care and not shrink the benefits or start chats that begin with "It is awfully expensive to stay to alive and healthy... let's chat about whether you really want to face life with less health care..." :BangHead:
     
  13. sag38

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    Mr. Wald must be a hermit living in the woods.
     
  14. Johnv

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    I though as conservatives we're not allowed to demonstrate any support for Social Security.
    Tat's not true. Those born prior to 1960 (that's you) are eligible at 65. Those born after 1960 are eligible at 67. It's been that way since 1983.
     
    #14 Johnv, Aug 24, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2009
  15. windcatcher

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    One constitutional ammendment which should have been passed a looooooooooooooooooooong time ago..........
    Congress shall make no law........ either regulating or restricting, or charging of tax, fine or penalty, or of promise of benefit, welfare, retirement, compensation, education, or any other such benefit which is applicable only to the citizens but not the congress or is applicable to the congress but not the citizens: No law shall be passed which protects members of congress by an exclusionary application.
     
  16. Magnetic Poles

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    I agree, however since it is Congress itself that would have to enact such a statute, it will never happen. ;)
     
  17. Tom Bryant

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    Can I quote that to the SS admin? Or do I believe what they send me? :laugh:
     
  18. Magnetic Poles

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    From HERE:

    Full retirement age

    The “full retirement age” is 65 for people who were born before 1938. But because of longer life expectancies, the Social Security law was changed to gradually increase the full retirement age until it reaches age 67. This change affects people born in 1938 and later. Check the following table to find your full retirement age.
    Age to receive full Social Security benefits
    Year of birth
    Full retirement age
    1937 or earlier
    65
    1938
    65 and 2 months
    1939
    65 and 4 months
    1940
    65 and 6 months
    1941
    65 and 8 months
    1942
    65 and 10 months
    1943-1954
    66
    1955
    66 and 2 months
    1956
    66 and 4 months
    1957
    66 and 6 months
    1958
    66 and 8 months
    1959
    66 and 10 months
    1960 and later
    67
    NOTE: People who were born on January 1 of any year should refer to the previous year.

    Early retirement

    You can get Social Security retirement benefits as early as age 62, but if you retire before your full retirement age, your benefits will be permanently reduced, based on your age. For example, if you retire at age 62, your benefit would be about 25 percent lower than what it would be if you waited until you reach full retirement age.
    Some people stop working before age 62. But if they do, the years with no earnings will probably mean a lower Social Security benefit when they retire.
    Note: Sometimes health problems force people to retire early. If you cannot work because of health problems, you should consider applying for Social Security disability benefits. The amount of the disability benefit is the same as a full, unreduced retirement benefit. If you are receiving Social Security disability benefits when you reach full retirement age, those benefits will be converted to retirement benefits. For more information, ask for Disability Benefits (Publication No. 05-10029).
    Delayed retirement

    You may choose to keep working even beyond your full retirement age. If you do, you can increase your future Social Security benefits in two ways.
    Each additional year you work adds another year of earnings to your Social Security record. Higher lifetime earnings may mean higher benefits when you retire.
    Also, your benefit will increase automatically by a certain percentage from the time you reach your full retirement age until you start receiving your benefits or until you reach age 70. The percentage varies depending on your year of birth. For example, if you were born in 1943 or later, we will add 8 percent per year to your benefit for each year that you delay signing up for Social Security beyond your full retirement age. NOTE: If you decide to delay your retirement, be sure to sign up for Medicare at age 65. In some circumstances, medical insurance costs more if you delay applying for it. Other information about Medicare is in "A word about Medicare."
     
  19. donnA

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    The paper* they send my husband every year telling him how much he's paid in and what he can expect to recieve at retirment says 67, and he was born in 1959.

    * and I'm sure someone knows this is called, I don't.
     
  20. Johnv

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    It's possible you're misunderstanding what you're reading. Once you reach 65, you receive full benefits. That won't change. It's possible you're getting the annual statement which shows how much you'll receive. That amount changes based on your contributions.
    It's called an annual statement paper thingy.
     
    #20 Johnv, Aug 24, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2009
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