Some light on elders and deacons in the CEB

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Deacon, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. Deacon

    Deacon
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    This saying is reliable, if anyone has a goal to be a supervisor in the church, they want a good thing. So the church supervisor must be without fault. They should be faithful to their spouse, sober, modest, and honest. They should show hospitality and be skilled at teaching.
    I Timothy 3:1-2 CEB

    In the same way servants in the church should be dignified, not two-faced, heavy drinkers, or greedy for money. They should hold on to the faith that has been revealed with a clear conscience. They should also be tested and then serve if they are without fault. In the same way, women who are servants in the church should be dignified and not gossip. They should be sober and faithful in everything they do . Servants must be faithful to their spouse and manage their children and their own households well.
    1 Timothy 3:8-12

    Elders should be without fault. They should be faithful to their spouse, and have faithful children who can’t be accused of self-indulgence or rebelliousness. This is because overseers should be without fault as God’s managers: they shouldn’t be stubborn, irritable, addicted to alcohol, a bully, or greedy.
    Titus 1:6-8

    Rob
     
  2. Deacon

    Deacon
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    I’m introducing our sister Phoebe to you, who is a deacon* of the church in Cenchreae.
    * Or servant
    Romans 16:1 CEB

    The Common English Bible takes an egalitarian view of church leadership.
    This position holds that since both men and women are equal (Galatians 3:28) either gender may hold a leadership position in the church.

    Rob
     
  3. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    Supervisor??? Definitely a mis-translation.:eek: In 20th century English we immediately connect the word "supervisor" with business or some agency--"So my supervisor said that I had to...." The church of Jesus Christ is not, of course, a business.

    supervisor (s¡´per-vì´zer) noun
    Abbr. supvr.
    1. One who supervises.
    2. One who is in charge of a particular department or unit, as in a governmental agency or school system.
    3. One who is an elected administrative officer in certain U.S. counties and townships.
    - su´pervi´sory (-vì´ze-rê) adjective
    Excerpted from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition © 1996 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Electronic version licensed from INSO Corporation; further reproduction and distribution in accordance with the Copyright Law of the United States. All rights reserved.
     
    #3 John of Japan, Sep 19, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2010
  4. Deacon

    Deacon
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    I wasn't too bothered by their use of "supervisor"
    The NAS and ESV translate it as "overseer".

    I was disappointed by the translations use of the word "spouse".
    IMO it pushes gender-neutral translation a bit too far.

    Rob
     
  5. Jerome

    Jerome
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    Overseer?
    :eek:
    The church is not a cotton plantation either.
     
  6. Jerome

    Jerome
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    Come on, if the CEB really had some gender agenda, would they dump "Son of Man" for "Human One"?
     
  7. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    IMO "overseer" is a more neutral word, and thus is better than "superintendent." Secular translation theories talk about the "norms" of a culture and language, that is, what words are commonly accepted as appropriate for certain usages. I can't think of "superintendent" as an appropriate way to talk about a pastor.
    I certainly agree with this.
     

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