St. John's College, Annapolis Great Books List

Discussion in 'Books / Publications Forum' started by Crabtownboy, Nov 26, 2010.

  1. Crabtownboy

    Crabtownboy
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    The following is the list of St. John's College in Annapolis. The list, as you will see, is broken down by year. This is the core curriculum of the school and it gives a great education. I have not read as many of these titles as I should have ... and probably will never read as many of them as I should. How about you?


     
  2. mcdirector

    mcdirector
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    Wow! Now that's a reading list!

    Like you, haven't read enough from it and at this point, probably won't.
     
  3. Timsings

    Timsings
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    I find some of the titles interesting. For example, in the Senior Year, Faulkner is listed with Go Down Moses but not The Sound and the Fury. In the Sophomore Year, Beethoven is listed with his Third Symphony but neither his Fifth nor his Ninth.

    Tim Reynolds
     
  4. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    From the St. John's College list--I am on Homer's Iliad.

    Translations
    Richmond Lattimore (University of Chicago Press, 1951)
    Robert Fitzgerald (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2004)
    Stanley Lombardo (Hacket Publishing, 1997)

    Commentaries
    Norman Postlethwaite (University of Exeter Press, 2000)
    Malcolm M. Wilcox (University of Chicago Press, 1976)

    Other Media
    In search of the Trojan War (Michael Wood, BBC, 1985)
    Troy the movie, starring Brad Pitt, Eric Bana, Orlando Bloom, & Diane Kruger (Wolfgang Petersen, Warner Bros, 2004)

    Bob's one-line comment
    Everyone needs to make a lifetime study of the Bible, Shakespeare, and Homer. You cannot understand England and the United States until you know all three.

    . . .

    Why is Pendar's Odes not on the list? I've got him going too!

    Translations
    William H. Race (Loeb Classical Library, 2 vols. 1997)
    C. S. Conway & Richard Stoneman (Everyman Library, 1997)
    Frank J. Nisetich (John Hopkins University Press, 1980)
    Richmond Lattimore (University of Chicago Press, 1947)

    Bob's one-line comment
    If you have never seriously played sports, you need to study Pendar's Odes to understand what all of the hoopla is about.

    ...Bob
     
    #4 BobinKy, Dec 11, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 11, 2010
  5. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    Yup, Go Down Moses is pretty weak compared to The Sound and the Fury (once you figure out how to read it).

    ...Bob
     
  6. BobinKy

    BobinKy
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    Opps! I misspelled Pindar in my first post. It is corrected in this post.

    Shows what kind of classical student I am. :eek:

    . . .

    A Word about Pindar, Poet of the Greek Olympics
    Pindar was a Greek poet who wrote victory odes for Greek athletes competing in the original Greek Olympics. Such athletes were from wealthy families and by all accounts, Pindar made a nice living from his poetry and song. Pindar was born in Kynoskephalai, a village on the outskirts of Thebes (the chief city in Boiotia). He belonged to the clan of the Aigeidai, prominent in Thebes and Sparta. He was born during the 65th Olympiad (520-516 B.C.), probably in the year 518. He studied pipe-playing, choral direction, and music. He composed until 452, with a lifespan of 80 years. His death is set arbitrarily at 438. (Race, 1997, Vol. 1, Introduction, p. 5).​

    And now, a sample of Pindar's poetry.

    Olympian Ode 5, epode 2, lines 15-16 (4 translations)

    Toil and expense, for deeds of courage,
    Must ever be the cost of valour's
    Accomplishment, hidden
    Within the veil of danger. But to those
    Who wins the victory,
    Even amidst their citizens
    Comes the reward of wisdom's reputation. (Conway & Stoneman, 1997, p. 34)

    Always attendant on valor, work and substance struggle to win
    the end veiled in danger;
    but when men succeed, even their neighbors think them wise. (Lattimore, 1947, p. 13)

    Always, in the contest for excellence,
    expense and labor
    struggle to achieve an exploit
    whose end
    lies veiled in danger--though the public
    thinks it sees wisdom in success. (Nisetich, 1980, p. 101)

    Always do toil and expense strive for achievements toward
    an accomplishment hidden in danger, but those who succeed
    are considered wise even by their fellow citizens. (Race, 1997, vol. 1, p. 97)



    REFERENCES
    Conway, G. S., & Stoneman, Richard, trans.; Stoneman, Richard, ed. (1997). Pindar: The Odes and Selected Fragments. Rutland, Vermont: Charles E. Tuttle Co. [Originally published Everyman, 1972].

    Lattimore, Richmond, trans. (1947). The Odes of Pindar. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Nisetich, Frank J., trans. (1980). Pindar's Victory Songs. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Race, William H., ed. & trans. (1997). Pindar I: Olympian Odes, Pythian Odes, Vol. 1. In Henderson, J., ed., The Loeb Classical Library. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.​



    I hope you enjoy the above.
    I hope no one gets upset with classical Greek poetry.

    ...Bob
     

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