State Law Makes it a Felony to Touch a Police Officer Even Off-Duty and Out of Uniform

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by poncho, Nov 5, 2015.

  1. poncho

    poncho
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    Two short-tempered men run into each other in a bar in Enid, Oklahoma. The combustible mixture of alcohol and ego produces the predictable reaction – a brief, stupid, and inconclusive fight in which neither side is seriously injured. When police officers arrive on the scene, onlookers expect that both parties to the altercation will be hauled away in handcuffs.

    However, after one of them produces a police credential, he is allowed to handcuff the other and place him under arrest for a felonious assault on an off-duty law enforcement officer. It doesn’t matter that the individual making the arrest might have been the same one who started the fight.

    This scenario is made entirely plausible by a newly enacted Oklahoma statute that makes any “assault” on an off-duty law enforcement officer a felony — and it is standard practice to treat nearly any physical contact with an officer as an “assault.” The law, which passed the legislature unanimously (always a bad sign), went into effect on November 1. In effect, this measure extends the cloak of “qualified immunity” to cover every aspect of a law enforcement officer’s life.

    “I had several law enforcement officers in my district come to me this past year and explain to me that current law says that if I’m in uniform and I’m assaulted, then it is a felony,” recalls Republican State Representative Mike Sanders, the primary sponsor of the bill. Two of them, Sanders insists, were assaulted off-duty, although no useful details were provided to validate those claims.

    “This is just one more tool to protect our law enforcement agents and officers,” Sanders continues. “Even though you make take off the uniform, you are always a law enforcement officer.”

    This makes perfect sense – if we assume that the expression “law enforcement officer” refers to an identity, rather than an occupation.

    Read more at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/st...officer-off-duty-uniform/#EjTxXg5TFllbxriY.99
     
  2. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
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  3. poncho

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    When you're reading about the American revolution do you find yourself siding with the redcoats Rev?

    I only ask because you don't seem to have much respect for citizens rights or safety.

    Intriguingly, the same Oklahoma Legislature that wants to extend special protections for off-duty police officers has made it a felony for citizens to take measures intended to protect their own homes from the police. In November 2009, a measure went into effect in Oklahoma making it a felony, punishable by a five-year prison term and a $10,000 fine, to “fortify” a home “for the purpose of preventing or delaying entry or access by a law enforcement officer.”

    The statute, written by Republican (natch) State Representative Sue Tibbs, forbids Oklahoma residents to “construct, install, position, use or hold any material or device designed … to strengthen, defend, restrict or obstruct any door, window, or other opening into a dwelling, structure, building or other place to any extent beyond the security provided by a commercial alarm system, lock or deadbolt, or a combination of alarm, lock, or deadbolt.”

    So it is that in Oklahoma, if you fight back when an off-duty cop shoves you in a bar, you can be charged with a felony. If, on the other hand, a SWAT team attacks your home in a no-knock raid, and its effort to breach your dwelling is thwarted because you installed “burglar bars,” you can also be charged with a felony. And if you protest that measures of this kind are the product of lunacy and political opportunism, you’re obviously among the proto-terrorist radicals waging a “war on the police.”


    Read more at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/st...officer-off-duty-uniform/#EjTxXg5TFllbxriY.99
     
    #3 poncho, Nov 5, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2015
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  4. Baptist Believer

    Baptist Believer
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    Any intentional unwanted physical contact with anyone (not just police officers) can be treated as assault, unless that person (as a citizen or peace officer) is taking another under arrest.

    It is a basic principle of law that was drilled into me many years ago when I was undergoing training on how to deal with the public as a private security officer.
     
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  5. Zaac

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    This is one of the reasons why folks don't like cops. They think they are above the law and can do whatever they want without consequence because stupid legislators make laws like this one.
     
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