Stephanus Manuscript

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by Elk, Oct 7, 2003.

  1. Elk

    Elk
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    I would like to inquire if this manuscript has been translated into English. If so, is it available on the internet?
    I recall seeing it as an alternate on the Blue Letter Bible, but it was not translated in English.
    Thank you for your time.
    God bless you all.
     
  2. HankD

    HankD
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    The NKJV is for the most part a translation of the Scrivener 1894/95 Greek New Testament.

    The Scrivener is the Stephanus with amendments to make it agree with the KJV.

    HankD
     
  3. Elk

    Elk
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    Thank you so much!
    I did not know this.
    Thank you again.
     
  4. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    http://www.christianbook.com/Christian/Books/product/123980145?item_no=106329&netp_id=214816&event=ESRCN&item_code=WW

    This is the #1 resource I recommend. I give a copy as an "ordination gift" at every council on which I sit.

    Good for the Greek scholar (but most of us can't possibly keep up with all the vocabulary) and the non-greek reader [although I would vote against ordaining ANY pastor who did not know Greek; even a self-trained man later in life can pick it up]

    It is the Stephans Greek text (1555) with literal English under it and KJV (whichever revision) in the margin.
     
  5. gb93433

    gb93433
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    I had one of those and wished I had memorized what the introduction said about knowing Greek. I wish now I had a copy of the introduction.
     
  6. Dr. Bob

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    From the Introduction to An Interlinear Literal Translation of the Greek New Testament by George Ricker Berry, Ph.D.

    The Value of Hebrew and Greek to the Clergyman

    1. Without some knowledge of Hebrew and Greek, you cannot understand the critical commentaries of the Scripture, and a commentary that is not critical is of doubtful value.

    2. Without some knowledge of Hebrew and Greek, you cannot satisfy yourself . . as to the changes which you will find in the Revised Old and New Testament.

    3. Without some knowledge of Hebrew and Greek, you cannot appreciate the critical discussions relating to the Books of the Old and New Testament.

    4. Without some knowledge of Hebrew and Greek, you cannot be certain that in your sermon based on a Scripture text, you are presenting the correct teaching of that text.

    5. Without some knowledge of Hebrew and Greek, you cannot be an independent student or a reliable interpreter of the Word of God.

    6. As much knowledge of Hebrew can be secured in one year with the aid of an Interlinear Old Testament as can be gained of Latin in three years. Greek, though somewhat more difficult, may be readily acquired with the aid of an Interlinear New Testament/Lexicon.

    7. The Hebrew language has, in all, 7000 words, and of them 1000 are repeated over 25 times each in the Old Testament.

    8. Hebrew grammar has but one form of the Relative pronoun in all cases, numbers and genders; by three forms for the Demonstrative pronoun. The possible verbal forms are about 300 as compared with the 1200 found in Greek. It has practically no declension.

    9. Within ten years, the average man wastes more time in fruitless reading and indifferent talk, that would be used in acquiring a good working knowledge of Hebrew and Greek that in turn would impart to his teaching that quality of independence and of reliability which so greatly enhances one's power as a teacher.

    10. There is not one minister in ten who migh not if he but would, find time and opportunity for such study of Hebrew and Greek as would enable him to make a thoroughly practical use of it in his work as a Bible-preacher and Bible-teacher.
     
  7. gb93433

    gb93433
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    Dr. Bob, Thank you.

    When I read that for the first time it motivated me to learn the languages. I had been a Christian just a few years. I asked many pastors I knew if they could help me. I finally found one who helped me some and then later went to seminary. What I read stuck with me all these years.

    Thanks.
     
  8. Dr. Bob

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    While I took 5 years of Greek and 2 of Hebrew formally, I was motivated to teach myself Latin. It IS hard and not the reward (I'm not a Vulgate Only) that was in the Bible languages.

    But great language and THANKFULLY it used the same alphabet (unlike Greek and Hebrew).

    In our Bible Institute we teach Greek for the English reader and how to use the tools. It is amazing how it has helped some of our local preachers who "bypassed" Greek in college.
     

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