Stricken, Smitten, And Afflicted

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by J.D., Jun 6, 2011.

  1. J.D.

    J.D.
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    I have never heard this hymn before tonight and was astounded at its glorious words:

    Stricken, smitten, and afflicted,
    See Him dying on the tree!
    ’Tis the Christ by man rejected;
    Yes, my soul, ’tis He, ’tis He!
    ’Tis the long expected Prophet,
    David’s Son, yet David’s Lord;
    By his Son God now has spoken:
    ’Tis the true and faithful Word.

    Tell me, ye who hear Him groaning,
    Was there ever grief like His?
    Friends thro' fear His cause disowning,
    Foes insulting his distress:
    Many hands were raised to wound Him,
    None would interpose to save;
    But the deepest stroke that pierced Him
    Was the stroke that Justice gave.

    Ye who think of sin but lightly
    Nor suppose the evil great
    Here may view its nature rightly,
    Here its guilt may estimate.
    Mark the sacrifice appointed
    See Who bears the awful load
    ’Tis the Word, the Lord’s Anointed,
    Son of Man and Son of God.

    Here we have a firm foundation,
    Here the refuge of the lost;
    Christ's the Rock of our salvation,
    His the Name of which we boast.
    Lamb of God for sinners wounded
    Sacrifice to cancel guilt!
    None shall ever be confounded
    Who on Him their hope have built.

    You can hear here:

    http://www.letgodbetrue.com/worship/songs/jehovah-reigns/stricken-smitten-and-afflicted.htm

    Also you might want to check out Fernando Ortega's version on Youtube.
     
  2. Zenas

    Zenas
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    I love the words to this hymn but when I listened to it, it became clear why we don't hear it very often.
     
  3. David Lamb

    David Lamb
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    Great, isn't it? It was written by Thomas Kelly (1769-1854) who is sometimes called “the Charles Wesley of Ireland.” Apparently he wrote over 800 hymns. Here are just the first verses of some we use at Foxhole Grace Baptist Church:
    The head that once was crowned with thorns
    Is crowned with glory now;
    A royal diadem adorns
    The mighty victor's brow.

    Look, ye saints! the sight is glorious:
    See the Man of Sorrows now;
    From the fight returned victorious,
    Every knee to Him shall bow;
    Crown Him, crown Him,
    Crown Him, crown Him,
    Crowns become the Victor's brow,

    The Lord is risen indeed!
    And are the tidings true?
    Yes, we beheld the Savior bleed,
    And saw Him living, too.

    Nothing know we of the season
    When the world shall pass away;
    But we know, the saints have reason
    To expect a glorious day;
    When the Savior shall return,
    And His people cease to mourn.

    Sound, sound the truth abroad;
    Bear ye the Word of God
    Through the wide world;
    Tell what our Lord hath done,
    Tell how the day is won,
    Tell from his lofty throne
    Satan is hurled.

    We sing the praise of Him who died,
    Of Him who died upon the cross;
    The sinner's hope let men deride,
    For this we count the world but loss.

    Who is this that comes from Edom,
    All His garments stained with blood;
    To the slave proclaiming freedom;
    Bringing and bestowing good;
    Glorious in the garb He wears,
    Glorious in the spoils He bears?
     
    #3 David Lamb, Jun 6, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 6, 2011
  4. David Lamb

    David Lamb
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    I've never heard that tune before. We usually sing it to a tune called "Deerhurst" which is one of the tunes set to "Lamb of God, our souls adore Thee" on Cyberhymnal, where, incidentally, there are 203 tunes of the right meter for the words. (Though obviously a very lively tune would be inappropriate, given the subject-matter of the words).

    So you could have the hymn without using the tune of the OP's link.
     
  5. J.D.

    J.D.
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    Wonderful! Does that hymn have a title I can look for on Internet?
     
  6. J.D.

    J.D.
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    Is it okay with you if some of us like the tune?
     
  7. JohnDeereFan

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    It's not one you hear often, that's for sure. To be honest, I had all but forgotten about it until I heard it in a clip on WretchedRadio. I think the boy who sings it is Scott Kripane (sp?).

    Now that you've brought it up, maybe it would be a good idea to introduce it into our church's worship service.
     
    #7 JohnDeereFan, Jun 6, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 6, 2011
  8. David Lamb

    David Lamb
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    Sorry, the words in my post were not from a single hymn; they were the first verses of 7 different hymns by Thomas Kelly, who wrote the hymn you quoted in the OP.

    If you type in the first line, in quotes, of each into Google (or whichever search engine you use), you should get loads of hits. Here is one sample for each of the 7 hymns:
    That process works for all but the rarest hymns. Some of the sites suggest a tune, or even have an audio file, but unless the words are in an unusual meter, you can find plenty of alternative tunes to fit.

    I hope that helps.
     
  9. Zenas

    Zenas
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    Sure, for those of you who can sing. But for those of us who can't it's a nightmare of a tune.
     
  10. Gina B

    Gina B
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    That's a fave here too. I have it by Ortega in my playlist. He sings a lot of the old hymns and just plain scriptures. Really knows how to take old ones and make them amazing in their pureness and simplicity of delivery with the old hymns. There's times where you really just have to be silent and listen. Like "O Thou in Whose Presence." The music is non-existant at first, then barely there, really put the focus on the words and their meaning without distraction. He's a true artist when it comes to doing that and his music ministers to my heart when I am weak and in need of having my spirit turn fully back to the Father.
     
  11. J.D.

    J.D.
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    Yes, very helpful. Thanks! I'm just amazed that in all my years of singing hymns I've never heard of Thomas Kelley.

    It seems that the older hymn books have a lot of great hymns we've never heard.
     
  12. J.D.

    J.D.
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    Yes, Ortega delivers an intensity that few others have. I have his version of "O Sacred Head Now Wounded" and "How Deep the Fathers Love for Us" saved in my favorites. I'll have to check "O Thou in Whose Presence".
     

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