SUPREME COURT TO CONSIDER STATE FUNDING OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by Cindy, May 20, 2003.

  1. Cindy

    Cindy
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    (Supreme Court-AP) -- The Supreme Court will consider
    whether states that offer educational grants can deny them to
    theology students.
    Joshua Davey wanted to use a Washington state grant program
    to help pay his tuition at an Assemblies of God college. The
    state initially approved the money, but then refused because he's
    majoring in theology.
    A lower court said the state was wrong to withhold the
    grant money.
    Washington and 14 other states have constitutional bans on
    state spending for theology classes. The Supreme Court will
    decide next term whether that violates a person's Constitutional
    freedom of religion.
     
  2. I Am Blessed 24

    I Am Blessed 24
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    This should be interesting. I'm sure the phrase, "Separation of Church and State" will be run into the ground.

    A degree is a degree is a degree. Why shouldn't the state pay for it? We need preachers just as much as we need lawyers, doctors, etc. IMO, we need them more!

    I don't think the states should have the right to say we will pay for your college as long as you get a degree that we approve of. What does this sound like to you?

    Blessings,
    Sue
     
  3. InHim2002

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    so owould you approve of state funding for muslim schools?
     
  4. I Am Blessed 24

    I Am Blessed 24
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    No, this is not a Muslim country.
     
  5. Johnv

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    Agreed. It's a secular country.
     
  6. stubbornkelly

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    It's not a Christian country either.

    My thinking on this is that if they're going to offer grants to private college students, it shouldn't matter which school the student attends, as long as it is accredited. And as long as state colleges have theology departments (which most do), it shouldn't be an issue.

    That said, I should think a college would be nonsectarian in its approach to academic religious studies. Anything other than that would be seminary, which I do not think should be eligible for state funding.
     
  7. Johnv

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    I second Kelly's comments, word for word. Has anyone seen my words? Someonehas taken them right out of my mouth!! :D
     
  8. fromtheright

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    I am far more often and much more comfortable on the Scalia/Thomas/Rehnquist side of church-state debate but I have to agree with Johnv on this one. Yes, there is a difference between government funds financing theology degrees and paying for a B.A. in basket weaving. That said, I think that Everson v. Board of Education was way off in applying the Establishment Clause to the states through the 14th Amendment and that the Establishment Clause does not apply to states. That is, though I think government should not be financing theology degrees it is none of the Supreme Court's business. The state of Washington has spoken in banning spending state monies on theology degrees so the Washington State Supreme Court should have the final word.
     
  9. go2church

    go2church
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    Should be interesting court case
     
  10. WillRain

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    Absolutly.

    Grants go to the STUDENT who decides what school and degreeto spend it on. The fact that it is sent directly to the school is no more relevant than to say that because taxes are withheld from your check and sent to the governemtn directly you are somehow not paying them.

    I am currently enrolled in a college where I am studying to aid my ministry but I an getting a degree is Social Science so that I may teach in the event I need to be a bi-vo.

    With a shift of just a few hours of coursework I could be majoring in Bible.

    IMNSHO, it would be discremination of the most blatant form for me to get grants to study ScoSci but not Bible.

    And I would absolutly not object to a Muslum or Hindu or anyone else majoring in something related to their faith with a Pell grant.

    We have freedom OF religion, not freedom FROM religion.
     
  11. WillRain

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    This is a valid point, but there's a LOT of bad stuff we have to put up with because of this application of the 14th. Unless we are going to get back things like the right to decide locally on things like prayer in school or abortion, then we need to let the 14th work for us once in a while instead of against us.
     
  12. Graceforever

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