Systematic or Biblical Theology?

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by Greektim, May 23, 2011.

  1. Greektim

    Greektim
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    Which one is more important?

    Which one takes precedent over the other?

    Which one do you rely on most when teaching doctrine?
     
  2. Tom Bryant

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    I guess you need to define what you are meaning by Biblical as opposed to Systematic theology.

    I am not sure that you can make a difference because systematic theology is, according to the one systematizing it , Biblical theology.

    Obviously if statements from the Bible contradict someone's systematic theology, you must take the Bible's statement.

    Because I preach expositionally, any theological statements come out of the text, but there have been times that I have done a topical, systematic theology study.
     
  3. Allan

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    Ones theology should 'not' dictate scriptural interpretation.

    Thus depending on how you are defining 'Biblical' Theology, I would state Biblical over Systematic.. but again, depending on what you mean by 'Systematic' .. :)
     
  4. Jim1999

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    They are two different courses of study in seminary. Biblical theology concerns itself with biblical truth including historicity of the text, culture, author, dating, circumstances, It includes God's action and interaction with creation.

    Systematic theology is the study of God in relation to creation, redemption, interaction, development of doctrine, all based on scripture.

    Two dfferent approaches to biblical study, but both important. One compliments the other; they do not contradict.

    That's my view on both in brief.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  5. Allan

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    That was my point. It depends on ones definitions to give a valid answer.
     
  6. Greektim

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    Here is a definition from mongergism.com (cf. http://www.monergism.com/thethreshold/articles/onsite/qna/systembiblical.html)

     
  7. Greektim

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    That is not a definition for biblical theology that I have ever heard of. That sounds more like the area of biblical studies or OT/NT introduction.
     
  8. preachinjesus

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    Why limit the question to just systematic or biblical theology. Since they are sub-disciplines of the larger category of theology, why not also include narrative theology, historical theology, philosophical theology, dogmatic theology, and practical theology?

    Just curious.
     
  9. JesusFan

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    isn't Systematic theology though someone view on what the Bible teaches on a whole/totality of any given biblical concept/doctrine?

    If yes, wouldn't that be useful in getting the 'broad perspective" on biblical theology, but most sermons/message/teachings more of a focus on more of individual basis?

    Think both compliment the other, problem is when your favorite theologian suddenly becomes equal to the Apostles or Prophets!
     
  10. Greektim

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    Cause those 2 may be the most prominent in theology (especially systematic).

    Plus, I don't find that historical or philosophical theologies are as determinative for doctrine as systematic or biblical.

    Some may equate dogmatic w/ systematic & narrative w/ biblical.

    Practical theology is of course the final result of all theology. So I did not include it.
     
  11. Dr. Bob

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    I taught "biblical theology" (starting with Gen 1:1 and developing progressively along with revelation)

    Each student then compiled their own "systematic theology" as revelation expanded. By the time we hit Revelation (9 credit class over 3 semesters) they had compiled truth about God - His attributes, character, attributes, etc. And about Jesus, the Spirit, man/sin, salvation, inspiration, etc - all of the subjects in a "systematic" book.

    But personalized to them, since we had to teach non-denominational (not Baptist).

    ASIDE:
    We taught Gen1-Rev22 "Chronology" of the Bible, looking at events in relation to world history = 9 credits

    Then next taught Gen1-Rev22 "Geography" of the Bible, looking at the spacial relationships of all events = 9 credits

    Next was Gen1-Rev22 "Theology" of the Bible (as above, in biblical theology) = 9 credits

    Finally was Gen1-Rev22 "Philosophy" of the Bible (how to apply, live truth with special emphasis on Proverbs and practical epistles = 9 credits

    So that was 36 credit Bible major without the conventional OT survey, Hebrew History, Life of Christ etc classes. Was a fantastic way to master Scripture
     

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