Teacher tenure

Discussion in 'Forum for Polls' started by menageriekeeper, Feb 14, 2008.

?

Our system tenures teachers

  1. yes

    10 vote(s)
    52.6%
  2. no, in our system we...

    1 vote(s)
    5.3%
  3. I don't know

    8 vote(s)
    42.1%
  1. menageriekeeper

    menageriekeeper
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    Here in Alabama, we have a system of tenuring teachers into particular systems. The rules for this apply state-wide. To be tenured into a system a teacher must: work for 3 years in that system, be recommended by their co-workers and administrators, be approved by the school board of that system. There are some checks done during this time within the system, but this is pretty much the basics. Once a teacher has been approved for tenure they recieve a contract that pretty much guarentees their job for as long as they want it (except gross criminal activity: sex crimes, murder). Before tenure a teacher must have their contract approved each year and can pretty much be let go at will.

    Tenure is the reason it is so hard to get rid of teachers who make comments like: "you boys are dumber than a dead coon on the side of the road". (Just one of many such comments made by a middle school teacher in my district who went on to teach for another 4 years until she retired)

    So, upon discovering that a neighboring state does not have a tenure system I'm curious about how many states have a tenure system similar to the one I've described?
     
  2. Dan Todd

    Dan Todd
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    The problem with tenure - the teacher has little incentive to work hard for the children - after the three year period is up!

    Also - one could be an excellent teacher - not be liked by administration - and get the heave-ho anyway!
     
  3. PJ

    PJ
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    This is definitely a problem, MK, and one we are familiar with. Our youngest son had a real dilly a few years back. There were so many complaints on her; she made middle schoolers cry! She was a little young to retire but finally did. Wow, talk about a loose cannon ... she had to go!
     
  4. Trotter

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    I know state universities have it, and I am pretty sure it is state-wide. I know I had some teachers who had to have tenure because they absolutely sucked at teaching us.
     
  5. Salty

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    I think that states should tenture taxi drivers. Say after three years with no tickets or collisons, we would have a permant license. Adter that, no matter what we might do, we would never loose our license!:thumbs:
     
  6. menageriekeeper

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    Yeah, it sound pretty good doesn't it?

    Hmmm, I wonder what other jobs would benefit from tenure? :D

    Okay, here's another question: In the states that have tenure systems do you also have a very strong teacher union?

    The AEA is one of our biggest lobbying forces in this state. If they don't like what's going in the legislature, it doesn't go on. Very few times have I seen the AEA lose an issue they were for or against.

    Oh yeah, for those of you who don't know, why don't you know? It's your civic duty to understand how your government runs things in your state. <end sanctamonious statement of the day> :D
     
  7. FriendofSpurgeon

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    Yes, our teachers (Florida) have tenure.

    And yes, we have very strong local and state teacher's unions. Despite that, we have elected a Republican Govenor for the past three elections over the unions' opposition.
     
  8. donnA

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    Not that I know of here
     
  9. mcdirector

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    I don't know what the state schools here do. Most of the teachers I know teach in private schools and we all are on year-to-year contracts.

    I imagine, they are tenured though based on what I've read on the state website.
     
  10. AAA

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    I don't know...
     
  11. chuck2336

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    At the higher levels of education they do in Texas. I am not sure about the public schools (lower levels) though
     
  12. SaggyWoman

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    bump,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
     
  13. Baptist Believer

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    I had a 5th grade teacher who was incompotent and verbally/emotionally-abusive toward her students. Throughout the school year I had her, I was one of the students she consistently harassed. On several occasions, she blatantly lied about my grades, falsified records, and successfully used the power of her position to make my life miserable. And I was not the only one who faced those problems that year. In fact, we found out that she had been doing that sort of things for more than a decade. Things got so bad that by the middle of the school year I was under a doctor's care for stress-related acid reflux syndrome (which ended shortly after summer vacation began).

    Fortunately, each time she sent me down to the principal's office to receive punishment for my alleged offenses, the principal would allow me to relax in his office before sending me back about an hour later or would have a friendly chat with me about my life and family. It was clear (especially as an adult looking back on it) that he didn't believe a word she said and was not going to punish the students for her mental illness.

    Added to all of her issues, she couldn't spell very well and would mark student's work wrong if they spelled things differently than she did (even if they showed her the proper spelling in the spelling book -- which was one of my mistakes the first week of class) and did not really know how to teach simple mathematics.

    Now I don't know if my hometown school district had an official tenure system, but I do know that the school district claimed their hands were tied until she decided to retire because of the teacher's union agreement.

    While I understand the purpose of tenure for the purposes of academic freedom in institutions of higher education, I don't think it is appropriate for K-12 level education. In college, you ultimately don't have to attend that school or take a certain professor. In public education, you are required by law to attend and you normally don't get your choice of teachers. Innocent students may easily find themselves under the authority of a psychopath without any real way to defend themselves or opt out.
     

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