The Baptist Spectrum - from one end to another

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by Refreshed, Dec 30, 2002.

  1. Refreshed

    Refreshed
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    I have heard it said that historically, Baptists were closer to Methodists theologically and practically (e.g. 1800's) than Baptists are amongst themselves today. What do you think? Does "Baptist" mean what it used to, or is it a generic term in today's world such as "Christian" has become(as the Mormons, JWs, RCs, etc. call themselves)?
     
  2. Wisdom Seeker

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    I've only experienced one type of Baptist...but the internet...actually this site revealed the multiplicity. I wouldn't be able to comment on Baptist history and it's simularities to Methodist. I think it is human nature to complicate things...I think that's why there are so many different kinds of Baptists. But that's just my own personal opinion. I think that some religions put more emphasis on what catagory they belong to than salvation...which if you think about it is really simple.
     
  3. Jim1999

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    Methodism produced many branches as well. It was never the desire of John Wesley and company to depart from the Anglican Church. They held meetings, village square meetings, tent meetings, but desired to stay within the Anglican Church.

    Among the original "Methodists" you have John and Charles Wesley on one hand and the Calvinist Newton on the other. In Wales, many Methodists churches were solid Calvinists.

    Early Baptists in England, after the order of John Smyth, were split between Arminians and Calvinists. The one thing in common was the individuals right to determine the interpretation of God's word as they were led by the Holy Spirit. All the other doctrines followed, but this was the main thought. All were deemed to be men of the Book.

    So, there has always been diversity within Baptist circles, and there always will be. We seek our commonality in our precious Lord and Saviour, Jesus the Christ. On this we make our test of fellowship. Everything else will sort itself out in time.......even if it takes eternity.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  4. rlvaughn

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    There has always been diversity among Baptists, although there is probably more now than there ever has been. So the diverse meaning of the name "Baptist" in not new. The comment of Baptists being closer to Methodists in the 1800's also has to take in consideration the great changes in the Methodist church since that time. Time and several mergers have changed the Methodists of my grandmother's time and belief into a large conglomeration of mostly liberal churches (speaking particularly of the United Methodists). I know several conservative Methodist friends that have abandoned Methodism because of its liberal leaning tendencies. My grandmother left the Methodists and joined our Baptist church when she was in her eighties. It really pained her to do so, but she no longer felt at home there.
     
  5. Ben W

    Ben W
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    The Methodist Church kicked out William Booth, for bringing poor people into the church. This birthed the Christion Mission now known as the Salvation Army who saw the greatest ever revival known to the western world.

    Baptists have always been Evangelical and all are welcome irrespective of what "class" you are in. Yes Baptist are diverse, but I dont feel that the term is generic.
     
  6. tyndale1946

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    Jim that was stated so eloquently... Now how come we can put what you said into practice on the BB?... Brother Glen :confused:
     
  7. 2Timothy4:1-5

    2Timothy4:1-5
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    Oh really? Can you say that 100% surety? I've been in churches where that isn't always the case. Some of those so-called Baptists would look down their collective noses at you.

    But hey, maybe it's just a Midwest thing, who knows.

    Kenneth
     
  8. Refreshed

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    Thanks for the methodist history lesson. I guess my main concern is that the baptists were getting so diverse in theology, so much more than in the past, that the name "baptist" itself was becoming diluted. Do you think this is the case?

    Maybe there are so many different types of baptists because it was a name placed on various groups throughout history by non-baptists.

    Would it be true to say that the historic baptist disagreed on many important points of doctrine with fellow baptists?

    I think this is an important issue today because of the hits the term "baptist" has taken, especially here in Arizona with the Baptist Foundation/Arthur Anderson problem of several years ago, and the seemingly increasing diversity of "beliefs" that are included under the baptist umbrella.
     
  9. Rev. Joshua

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    Unquestionably. The work of Walter "Buddy" Shurden in this area is particularly helpful.

    I generally explain to folks that "baptist" in and of itself is not a denominational or doctrinal identity. It is an approach to faith, which takes on several different permutations becuase it has no central authority beyond the local congregation's interpretation of Scripture and the individual's interpretation of Scripture.

    Joshua

    [ December 31, 2002, 11:49 AM: Message edited by: Rev. Joshua ]
     
  10. Refreshed

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    Unquestionably. The work of Walter "Buddy" Shurden in this area is particularly helpful.

    I generally explain to folks that "baptist" in and of itself is not a denominational or doctrinal identity. It is an approach to faith, which takes on several different permutations becuase it has not central authority beyond the local congregation's interpretation of Scripture and the individual's interpretation of Scripture.

    Joshua
    </font>[/QUOTE]Yeah, that would explain the diversity then. Thanks.
     
  11. Bro. James Reed

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    If you want to know what the Baptists believed in up to 1832, visit any solid Primitive Baptist Church. We hold the same beliefs and practices today that were held in the Baptist church up to the time of the split.

    This split formed the Missionary Baptists. Look online for the Black Rock Address and you will see what the differences are in beliefs.

    I can't say we were like Methodists because I don't know what they believed. Though, with regards to Methodists today, we are nothing like them.

    God Bless. Bro. James [​IMG]
     
  12. Refreshed

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    I checked out the website: www.pb.org

    and it had lots of interesting information about the Primative Baptists, including the Black Rock Address. Thanks for the info.

    By the way, I don't think there are any Primitive Baptist Churches in Arizona. At least Yahoo won't yeild any.

    [ December 31, 2002, 02:26 PM: Message edited by: Refreshed ]
     
  13. Jeff Weaver

    Jeff Weaver
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    Refreshed

    There are a few Primitive Baptist churches in Arizona, There is one in Phoneix, one in Mesa, and one in Tuscon, and a few more if my memory serves correctly. I haven't been able to find my church directory since we moved in June.

    At any rate, back to your original question -- I suspect that most early American Baptists (ante-1750) were far closer akin to early Presbyterians than to early Methodists. This tendency changed about the time of the great awakening of ca. 1800, and at that time many Baptists adopted many of the innovations of the Methodists. These would include protracted meetings, altar calls, mourners benches, and Sunday schools. It was at this point in Baptist history that major schisms began. The influence of historic Methodism is greater among Baptists than most Baptists I know would be willing to admit.

    Back in the dark ages when I was in college I took a course on religious thought in American history, and this idea (presented above) was fairly well documented. Wish I could find those text books, but they are lost with the directory.

    Hope it helps.

    Jeff.
     

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