The Earth in Ruins - no humans alive

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by BobRyan, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. BobRyan

    BobRyan
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    Here is yet another time in Earth's history from Jer 4

    Jer 4

    23 I looked on the earth, and behold, it was formless and void;
    And to the heavens, and they had no light.
    24 I looked on the mountains, and behold, they were quaking,
    And all the hills moved to and fro.
    25I looked, and behold, there was no man,
    And all the birds of the heavens had fled.
    26I looked, and behold, the fruitful land was a wilderness,
    And all its cities were pulled down
    Before the LORD, before His fierce anger.
    27For thus says the LORD,
    "The whole land shall be a desolation,
    Yet I will not execute a complete destruction.
    28"For this the earth shall mourn
    And the heavens above be dark,
    Because I have spoken, I have purposed,
    And I will not change My mind, nor will I turn from it."


    Where does this time for earth fit in your escatology?

    During the Millennium?


     
  2. drfuss

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    Where does this time for earth fit in your escatology? Jer. 4: 23-28.

    During the Millennium?

    I think these verses apply to the land of Judah after Babylon conquers and destroys the land. This is the context both before and after these verses.
     
  3. BobRyan

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    Do you think the earth itself becomes "Formless and void" for the sake of Judah??

    Or do you find that God frequently refers to Judah as being the whole earth?

    Or do you view this as God "exagerating"?
     
  4. drfuss

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    Jeremiah was telling the people of Judah about the coming disaster. In this case, the earth meant the land of Judah. Jeremiah was trying to get their attention about the coming disaster and could have been exagerating to do it. To the people of Judah, it would appear the earth was in the described condition.

    Jeremiah could have seen what is coming in the latter days. But based on the context, it probably only applied to Judah.
     
  5. hillclimber1

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    I briefly scanned a commentary by Matthew Henry and he seems to agree with drfuss
     
  6. LeBuick

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    Interesting question, where is Judah today?
     
  7. BobRyan

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    Is there any clear case in scripture where God uses the term "earth" to just mean the northern kingdome of Israel or the southern kingdom?

    If not - then inserting that kind of thing here does not work.

    It is the same thing that we see with the statements about Lucifer in Isaiah couched in the context of some local heathen king. The statements are too broad and expansive to refer to any living mortal.

    As in the case here in Jeremiah. So we either conclude "God exaggerates" or we see the bigger picture about Lucifer or the end of the world being folded into some local story. In which case - the points - the details are accurate - and not extreme exageration.

    In Christ,

    Bob
     
  8. Link

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    Take a look for references to 'the land' and 'the earth' in a concordance. Sometimes 'ha eretz' in Hebrew refers to the land of Israel.

    This is also something to keep in mind when we study about 'the earth' (or 'the land') being flooded in Noah's day. Perhaps only the parts of the earth that were inhabited by humans were flooded.
     
  9. BobRyan

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    I think I have seen "The land of Israel" but not "The earth of Israel". "The land of Judah" but not "The earth of Judah".

    In Genesis 6-8 we see "Dry land" but never "the dry land of Israel" or "the dry land of Judah" or "Dry land" as a reference to just the land of Judah.

    It appears that "Dry Land" is very specific and "Earth" is very specific in scripture.

    But if you have found it to be just limited to "The country of Judah" I would be interested in where you found it.

    In Christ,

    Bob
     
  10. Tom Bryant

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    Not trying to hijack... but ... Then how did the Ark land on top of Ararat?

    It doesn't really bother me that I can't figure out how these verses fit in to a pre-mill, post-mill or a-mill eschatolgy. Personally, I'm not so sure that any system of eschatology will explain every passage of Scripture because our systems are not necessarily God's plan for the future.
     
  11. BobRyan

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    Actually - the verse fits perfectly into a premillennial view -- it just does not allow the millennium (the literal 1000 years) to occur as some have imagined it -- but rather it insists on keeping very close track of the inconvenient details of Rev 19 and 20 and accepting them.
     

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