The Irish: The forgotten white slaves

Discussion in 'Politics' started by carpro, Jul 14, 2015.

  1. carpro

    carpro
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    http://www.americasfreedomfighters.com/2015/06/16/the-irish-slave-trade-the-forgotten-white-slaves/


    The Irish Slave Trade: The Forgotten WHITE Slaves…


    We’ve all been taught the horror’s of the African slave trade. It’s in all the school books and in plenty of Hollywood movies and has been shoved down our throats since Obama took office. But for some reason the largest group of slaves in the British Colonies in the 17th Century doesn’t get mentioned at all- the Irish.

    They came as slaves: human cargo transported on British ships bound for the Americas. They were shipped by the hundreds of thousands and included men, women, and even the youngest of children.

    Whenever they rebelled or even disobeyed an order, they were punished in the harshest ways. Slave owners would hang their human property by their hands and set their hands or feet on fire as one form of punishment. Some were burned alive and had their heads placed on pikes in the marketplace as a warning to other captives.
     
  2. wpe3bql

    wpe3bql
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    My ancestors were originally from SE Scotland (near the town of Dumfries). Since they were poor and held no land, they too were forced from their homes by the landed gentry---some may have been native Scots men, but also there were some landed gentry who were actually English who also held lands in this border area of Scotland and England.

    Most of my ancestors were forced to flee across the Irish Sea to "newer" lands, especially along the eastern seaboard of Ireland.

    To make matters worse, Ireland suffered a series of what's known as "Potato Famines." These were famines during which the poor Irish farmers' potato crops (which were their primary [and sometimes only] cash crops) were seriously---and often completely--depleted.

    As with any farmer whose sole source of income is gleaned 100% from the crops which he raises and subsequently sells to whoever buys them, these series of famines pretty much ruined them.

    The only alternative for most of these poor Irish (or in my ancestors' case, "Scots-Irish") people was to seek a better life in America. Hence, many Irish came to America during these times.

    Many of them came during the colonial period of the US. As a result, during our War for Independence, a good portion of the patriot army's ranks were people of Irish/Scots-Irish descent.

    In my particular case, my direct ancestors didn't come until the early 1840's. They sailed from the port city of Antrim which is located on the SE Irish coast.

    They landed in "down east" Maine. From there they moved southward to Massachusetts, then to New Jersey, and finally to around Philadelphia, PA.

    They farmed on small plots to make ends meet, but were never considered as more than lower-middle class economically speaking. Like any other family, they sought to improve their financial status, but seldom succeeded.

    OTOH, they eventually managed to improve their lot financially---not being "rich," but at least they were able to survive through the Depression Era because they were farmers and could at least grow enough crops to feed their families.

    My father didn't serve directly in the military during WW2, probably because his 3d child (my brother) was born in 1940, and that put him in some category that enabled him to be deferred from active military duty. OTOH, both my parents worked in defense-related industries.

    "Dad" (age 34) worked in an aircraft construction plant, and "Mom" (age 28) worked sewing Army uniforms. Two of my mother's brothers did serve in the military in WW2--one in Europe and one in the Pacific.

    I still have my parents' ration coupon book that shows that, like everyone else, things were rationed during the war. What's interesting to me is what was printed on these ration books.

    Here's just a portion:

    "Rationing is a vital part of your country's war effort. This book is your Government's guarantee of your fair share of goods made scarce by war, to which the stamps contained herein will be assigned as the need arises.

    "Any attempt to violate the rules is an effort to deny someone his share and will create hardship and discontent.

    "Such action, like treason, helps the enemy.

    "Give your whole support to rationing and thereby conserve our vital goods. Be guided by the rule: If you don't need it, DON'T BUY IT.'"
     
  3. carpro

    carpro
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    From the OP source:

     
  4. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    I have great-great grandfathers on both sides that came to America as Irish/Scots refugees, and were conscripted right into the civil war. Who knows how many died.
     

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