The Logic of BRAPSIS

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by Squire Robertsson, Sep 8, 2006.

  1. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson
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    #1 Squire Robertsson, Sep 8, 2006
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  2. NaasPreacher (C4K)

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    I first glance I like it! It clairfies any possible misconceptions about what the traditional "b-a-p-t-i-s-t-s" might have.

    I understand though why we use the acronym - it fits. While this might be a better definition, it would not serve the purpose our old way does.

    I think the area of debate might over the S2 aspect of the new word.
     
    #2 NaasPreacher (C4K), Sep 9, 2006
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  3. rsr

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    While that certainly has been the norm, Baptists have recognized other ordinances, such as foot washing and even hymn singing and laying on of hands (Philadelphia Baptist Confession, one of the most influential American Baptist confessions.) Certainly baptism and the Lord's Supper have had a preeminent place, but other ordinances have been observed.

    To me, the nonsacramental aspect of the ordinances is more important than the number.

    Now as to S2 — I think that is essentially correct, though it is not so true today as in times past. Baptists have traditionally been separationists; those who didn't separate became something else (like so many of the English Generals who dissolved into Unitarianism or the American Baptists who became Campbellites.)

    Baptists have not always agreed upon the bounds of separation, but I think the impulse has been strong, which explains the number of splits, resurgences, etc. among Baptists. Even today, Baptists as a whole are less ecumenical than many other brands of Christians.

    I think this will continue to be the case, although many Baptists' standards of separation will not meet with approval from some other Baptists. The recent decision of the GARBC to disassociate from Cedarville University shows the differing views of Baptists about separation and the lengths to which it should be carried.

    One other thing — Did I miss something in the article about congregational polity?
     
    #3 rsr, Sep 9, 2006
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  4. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson
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    A Few Words about Dr. Weeks

    The article gives a very brief biography of Richard Weeks. But, I'd like to make a couple of comments here that would be of interest as you think on BRAPSIS2 . These comments come from my having taken Baptist Polity and History form the man.
    • Dr. Weeks purposefully looked to the core of Baptist practice and thought in this list of distinctives. While other practices have been listed as ordinances, none have been held to be sacraments (unless you count ordination which is one of the RCC's scaraments).
    • He held to the Spiritual Kinship Theory of Baptist History. So, he used these distinictives in looking at potential spiritual predessors.
    • Dr. Weeks was rooted in the old Northern Baptist Convention. From his entry in MBBC's 77-78 catalog: Wheaton College, Albion College, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, University of Chicago [residence work completed for Th.D.]
    • Considering the General Particular split, he purposefully left out the C\A side of things.
     

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