The Nazi Roots of Modern Radical Islam

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by carpro, Jan 29, 2005.

  1. carpro

    carpro
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    The Nazi Roots of Modern Radical Islam

    By Tom Knowlton

    EXCERPT

    However, after over 700 years of peaceful coexistence, the true start of the Arab-Israeli conflict can be dated to 1920 and the rise of one man, Haj Amin Muhammad Al Husseini, the grand mufti of Jerusalem. As grand mufti, al Husseini presided as the Imam of the Al Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, the highest Muslim authority in the British mandate.

    History shows Al Husseini to be a brutal man with aspirations to rule a pan-Arabic empire in the Middle East. He rose to prominence by actively eliminating those Jews and Arabs he considered a threat to his control of Jerusalem's Arab population, and he heavily utilized anti-Jewish propaganda to polarize the two communities.

    In 1920 and again in 1929, Al Husseini incited anti-Jewish riots by claiming the Jews were plotting to destroy the Al Asqa mosque. The riots resulted in the massacre of hundreds of Jewish civilians and a virtual end to the Jewish presence in Hebron.

    The 1936 Arab revolt against the British is believed to have been at least partially funded by Nazi Adolf Eichmann, and Al Husseini again ordered armed Arab militias to massacre Jewish citizens.

    When British authorities finally quelled the rebellion in 1939, Al Husseini fled to neighboring Iraq and helped to orchestrate a 1941 anti-British jihad. As in Jerusalem, the British successfully put down the rebellion and Al Husseini fled to Nazi Germany.

    Al Husseini found the Nazis to be a strong ideological match with his anti-Jewish brand of Islam, and schemed with Hitler and the Nazi hierarchy to create a pro-Nazi pan-Arabic form of government in the Middle East.

    Dr. Serge Trifkovic documents the similarities between Al Husseini's brand of radical Islam and Nazism in his book The Sword of the Prophet. He noted parallels in both ideologies: anti-Semitism, quest for world dominance, demand for the total subordination of the free will of the individual, belief in the abolishment of the nation-state in favor of a "higher" community (in Islam the umma or community of all believers; in Nazism, the herrenvolk or master race), and belief in undemocratic governance by a "divine" leader (an Islamic caliph, or Nazi führer).

    The Nazis provided Al Husseini with luxurious accommodations in Berlin and a monthly stipend in excess of $10,000. In return, he regularly appeared on German radio touting the Jews as the "most fierce enemies of Muslims," and implored an adoption of the Nazi "final solution" by Arabs. After the Nazi defeat at El Alamein in 1942, Al Husseini broadcast radio messages on Radio Berlin calling for continued Arabic resistance to Allied forces. In time, he came to be known as the "Fuhrer's Mufti" and the "Arab Fuhrer."

    In March 1944, Al Husseini broadcast a call for a jihad to "kill the Jews wherever you find them. This pleases God, history, and religion."

    On numerous occasions, Al Husseini intervened in the fate of European Jews, most notably blocking Adolph Eichmann's deal with the Red Cross to exchange Jewish children for German POWs.

    Moreover, Al Husseini personally recruited Bosnia Muslims for the German Waffen SS, including the Skanderberg Division from Albania and Hanjer Division from Bosnia. The Hanjer (Saber) Division of the Waffen SS was responsible for the murder of over 90 percent of the Yugoslavian Jewish population.

    SS leader Heinrich Himmler was so pleased with Al Husseini's Muslim Nazis that he established the Dresden-based Mullah Military School for their continued recruitment and training. In 1944, Hanjer commandos parachuted into Tel Aviv and poisoned drinking wells in Jewish communities in an effort to stir up ethnic tensions.

    After the fall of Nazi Germany, Al Husseini fled to Cairo, Egypt in 1946 rather than face war crime charges for his actions in Yugoslavia. But he continued his operations.
     
  2. church mouse guy

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    Isn't Al Husseini an uncle of Arafat?

    From what I understand of Islam, if a person is not a Jew or Christian and will not convert to Islam, he is to be killed right away. The Jews who will not convert are to be killed next on Saturday, and the Christians who will not convert are to be killed afterwards on Sunday.

    cmg
     
  3. ChurchBoy

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    carpo,

    Can you cite your source please. [​IMG]
     
  4. carpro

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  5. Stratiotes

    Stratiotes
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    I don't know - Islam may be a lot of things but I don't think I've ever heard it called "nationalist" or "socialist" in its poltical slant. On the other hand, there are quite a few political movements in our own country that are both.

    Then there is the distinction that must be made between those who adhere strictly to the koran and those who adhere more to a particular culture or tradition....much like the distinction we make in our own beliefs. I wouldn't lump all Muslims into one category anymore than I'd lump all Christians into one. Some have argued that the KKK, which claims to be a Christian organization, is representative of "real" southern-baptist philosophy for instance. I do realize that was not the intent and that you were making a distinction between "militant Islam" and other forms. But, all too often it is taken the other way.

    If you look back at WWII resistance movements, you will find they covered a wide range between those who thought it best to cooperate for compromise or those who resisted without compromise. But we can see that in every conflict. Cooperation does not, in itself, imply an acceptance of the same philosophy. Which brings back to my initial point, Islam - radical or otherwise - does not have the two major marks of the Nationalist Socialist party...which makes me think they are something different....not better, not worse, just different.
     
  6. church mouse guy

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    Is the baathist party in Syria and Iraq considered socialistic?

    It is interesting to note that both the nazis and the Islamofascists hate democracy.
     
  7. Matt Black

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    What Strat said. Plus, I think people are confusing "my enemy's enemy (the Jews and Britain in this case) is my friend" (which, after all, is originally an Arab maxim) with some kind of common ideology; it's a bit like suggesting that because the USA and USSR fought on the same side in WWII that they shared common values. A cursory glance at Mein Kampf and other bits and pieces of Nazi ideology would have revealed (to those who could read, of course) that the Arabs only came a step or two up from the monkeys and the Jews and below the Slavs in the Nazi evolutionary pecking order, so I doubt that your average Arab would have found much attractive in Hitler and Co outwith the above maxim

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  8. Matt Black

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    Yes, but hardly Islamic; witness Dubya and Co's mistake in thinking that Al-Qaeda and Saddam were in cahoots. Iraq was the last place Bin laden and Co would have sought to recruit - how times change!

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  9. church mouse guy

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    Here is what Joseph Farah at World Net Daily said:

    The grand mufti was not just Arafat's "hero," as he says. Arafat was, in fact, so close to al-Husseini that the young terrorist called him "uncle." Arafat's real name is Rahman Abdul Rauf el-Qudwa al-Husseini, though his actual blood relationship with al-Husseini is in question. His entire career was sponsored by the dreaded Nazi mufti. He was, indeed, Arafat's mentor, his inspiration for 40 years of terror, murder, hatred and international duplicity.
     
  10. Kayla

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    I acutally read a article about this for communications class. The Mufti was actually in Berlin during the second world war as Hitler's guest. And was a close friend of Himmler(the man who master minded the final solution) And at the end of the war was exiled to Egypt. Where he started Arab schools teaching Nazi ideals. One of the students at one these schools was a man by the name of Osama bin Ladin. Sound familar?
     
  11. Daisy

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    Yes, free health care and free education, or, rather, government sponsored.
     
  12. Enoch

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amin_al-Husayni
    scroll down on the link to read more about WWII.

    The encyclopedia is kind and vague imo.

    OT Imagine if you lived in Europe during Hitler’s reign. Who in your circle of friends would you trust?
     

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