The paradox of ''goodness''

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by Born_in_Crewe, Dec 23, 2009.

  1. Born_in_Crewe

    Born_in_Crewe
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    Here I go again... :laugh:

    People often accuse ''religion'' (not always specifying which one) of being a cause of evil. They also say that you can be a ''good'' person without having faith. There is a clear paradox here, especially with the second. Given the polluted and sometimes evil nature of man and society, a truly ''good'' person would not be able to live in such a world and would end their existence, given that under a world view of there being no judgement after death, the most heinous criminals can (if not punished during this life) escape punishment altogether.

    The difference with a Christian is that (a) we have a duty in this world; and (b) we know that unrepentant sinners will face punishment after death, so it is not as bad if they escape punishment in this life.
     
  2. billwald

    billwald
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    Depends upon how one defines "good." Are some acts intrinsically good or bad or does the intent of the act determine goodness or badness?

    For example, the story of Joseph and his brothers. (How) Do we classify acts? by intent or outcome?

    Are not most acts a mixture of good and evil both in intent and outcome?

    Are not many good deeds done to gain brownie points with neighbors and/or with God? If a Christian expects to get brownie points with God then are not all of his good deeds selfish?
     

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