The Pilgrims land in Virginia...

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by Salty, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. Salty

    Salty
    Expand Collapse
    20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,130
    Likes Received:
    221
    The Pilgrims had planned on landing in Virginia. Had their trip took them to Virginia, how do you think Americian History would have been different.

    Salty

    PS Would we still have Thanksgiving
     
  2. Dustin

    Dustin
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not really. Wasn't Thanksgiving made a federal holiday by Abe Lincoln?
     
  3. Salty

    Salty
    Expand Collapse
    20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,130
    Likes Received:
    221
    My first thought was that the Pilgrims came to America for religious freedom (as long as you worshiped their way). They eventually became the Congregational Church. Those who later landed in VA were still part of the Church of England.

    Now if you remember, Roger Williams became a Baptist due the restrictions of the Pilgrims/Puritans.

    Therefore, Baptist history would have begun in Virginia instead of New England.

    Thoughts

    Salty
     
  4. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,077
    Likes Received:
    102
    What was known as Viriginia, at the time, was most of the eastern seaboard: from roughly Cape Fear in what is now North Carolina north to about what is the current border of Canada with Vermont and New Hampshire.

    The Pilgrims had no intention of setting up shop anywhere near a bunch of Anglicans and deliberately chose to get as far away as practical. They had wanted to settle along the Hudson River in what is now New York, but they were unable to navigate south of Cape Cod and settled at Plymouth.

    It is possible that had the Pilgrims landed on the Hudson they, and not the Dutch, would have founded New York City, which would have become a Puritan stronghold.
     
  5. PastorGreg

    PastorGreg
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2000
    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    0
    There is a common misconception repeated here - The Pilgrims were NOT Puritans; they were Separatists and NEVER engaged in the persecution of Roger W or anyone else. The Puritans came to America later in the Mass. Bay Colony and eventually scorned Plymouth because they didn't persecute the Baptists.
     
  6. Bible-boy

    Bible-boy
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2002
    Messages:
    4,254
    Likes Received:
    0
    There is another misconception here as well... The Jamestown Colony in VA was founded in AD 1607. The Pilgrims did not arrive in MA until AD 1620. So those who landed in VA did not do so "later" (meaning following the Pilgrims). My ancestors established a plantation on the James River in Virginia called "Sheffield" in AD 1619.
     
    #6 Bible-boy, Feb 12, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 12, 2007
  7. Bible-boy

    Bible-boy
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2002
    Messages:
    4,254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here is a good related article:

    http://www.usgennet.org/usa/topic/colonial/book/chap5_2.html
     
  8. El_Guero

    El_Guero
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Messages:
    7,714
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sounds like ya' need to read a little history . . .

     
  9. FriendofSpurgeon

    FriendofSpurgeon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Messages:
    3,056
    Likes Received:
    36
    My relatives landed on the James river in the 1600's, so perhaps they "visited" your family's plantation. An interesting book on this is The History of the Scotch Irish in America.
     
  10. Bible-boy

    Bible-boy
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2002
    Messages:
    4,254
    Likes Received:
    0
    That is entirely possible. In doing the genealogy research for that era you see that those early families were very close. My ancestors were John and Seth Ward (well they spelled it "Warde"). William Byrd mentions his neighbor "Mr. Ward" many times in his private diary. He talks about visiting with him and going to be with him at his death bed. The Wards and the Byrds ended up being related via marriage.
     
  11. Martin

    Martin
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Messages:
    5,228
    Likes Received:
    0
    Several comments.

    I agree with your statement that people need to learn the differences between Puritans and Separatists. I also agree with you that the Scrooby Pilgrams have often been accused of doing things that they simply did not do and I agree that the record must be corrected on that matter.

    The Pilgrams may not have persecuted Roger Williams (etc) as the Puritans did (ex: Massachusetts Bay) however let's keep in mind the Pilgrams were not that happy with Williams. When Roger Williams left Plymouth William Bradford was clear that he found many of Williams teachings to be "strange opinions". It is also clear that the Pilgrams did not exactly object to the type of things Puritans were doing in Massachusetts. That is not to say that they agreed on everything, nor is it to say that they did not have strong disagreements, but it is to say that the Pilgrams and Bradford were not exactly promotors of religious tolerance or freedom.

    I find much to admire in William Bradford, John Carver, William Bruster, Edward Winslow and the other Plymouth pilgrams from Scrooby. After all they did survive a very tough voyage and winter that proved deadly for many of their friends. I admire the way they were able to establish some agreements with Massasoit and his Pokanokets. Now that is not to say that I approve of all of their behaviors and later actions. But it is to say that I admire them for beating the odds. I also admire men like John Winthrop and others at Massachusetts Bay.

    However I confess that my sympathies are with Roger Williams. While I can't agree with some of his "strange opinions" concerning the church I do agree with his views on Indian lands, seperation of church and state, and religious toleration/freedom. It also does not hurt that Williams, at least for a time, was a Baptist.
     
  12. Baptist in Richmond

    Baptist in Richmond
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Messages:
    5,075
    Likes Received:
    4
    I certainly hope to see both of you here in the Commonwealth this year. It is only about a month away, and we are all getting excited.

    Regards,
    BiR
     

Share This Page

Loading...