The "tenth planet" is discovered

Discussion in 'Science' started by Gup20, Aug 5, 2005.

  1. Gup20

    Gup20
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    http://www.answersingenesis.org/docs2005/0805tenth_planet.asp

    The "tenth planet" is discovered
    by Dr. Jason Lisle, AiG–USA

    August 5, 2005

    Astronomers have discovered a new member of our solar system. The object is estimated to be slightly larger than Pluto and is the most distant object in our solar system to be detected so far. NASA is calling this object the "tenth planet."

    With all the recent discoveries of planets orbiting other stars, it is exciting to find a new planet in our own solar system. The object (currently designated "2003 UB313" until it is assigned a permanent name) was discovered by astronomers Michael E. Brown, Chad Trujillo, and David Rabinowitz. It lies at the incredible distance of 9 billion miles (14 billion km) from the sun, nearly one hundred times farther away than Earth is, and more than twice as distant as Pluto. It is estimated to be about 1,600 miles (2,600 km) in diameter.

    Several years ago, astronomers began discovering a number of large, icy masses just beyond the orbit of Neptune. These are called "Trans-Neptunian Objects" (TNOs), or "Kuiper-Belt Objects" (KBOs). So far, these TNOs have all been smaller than Pluto which has a diameter of 1,400 miles (2,250 km). Like asteroids, TNOs are generally considered to be too small to be classified as a planet. But 2003 UB313 is larger than Pluto, and thus Brown argues that it should be classified as a planet since Pluto is. However, many astronomers argue that even Pluto should not be classified as a planet, but rather as merely another KBO/TNO. The discovery of 2003 UB313 is likely to revitalize this debate. In any case, the textbooks will have to be rewritten.

    This new planet/TNO has a number of similarities with Pluto. Analysis of the composition of 2003 UB313 shows the presence of methane ice. Pluto’s composition also shows methane ice, but (other) TNOs do not. Like Pluto, 2003 UB313 has a highly eccentric orbit—meaning it is very elliptical. 2003 UB313 is currently near the most distant point (aphelion) of its elliptical orbit. At its closest approach to the sun (perihelion), it reaches a distance of 3.3 billion miles (5.4 billion km); this is greater than Neptune’s distance, but less than Pluto’s average distance from the sun. This means that 2003 UB313 sometimes comes closer to the sun than Pluto, just as Pluto is sometimes closer than Neptune.

    2003 UB313 takes 557 years to orbit the sun once—the longest period of any known planet. Pluto had the previous record at 248.5 years. The orbit of 2003 UB313 is also highly inclined; it is “tilted” 44 degrees relative to the other planets which orbit in nearly the same plane as the earth (the ecliptic). Pluto had the previous (planet) record with an inclination of 17 degrees. Such unusual orbital properties must seem a bit surprising to secular astronomers who believe the solar system collapsed from a cloud of gas and dust. In fact, the expectation that planets must lie in the ecliptic may explain why this “tenth planet” was not discovered previously; no one was looking there!

    TNOs in general have been quite different from what secular astronomers were expecting. They are far more massive than the comet nuclei that were predicted to lie in the "Kuiper Belt." Of course, 2003 UB313 sets the new record for TNO size, being almost as large as the moon. Moreover, a surprising number of TNOs are binary; they consist of two components that orbit each other as the pair orbits the sun.

    But such amazing worlds as the distant 2003 UB313 are consistent with the creative power of God. The Lord made all these things for His pleasure. In fact, it wouldn’t be surprising to a biblical creationist if more such objects with unusual orbits were discovered in the outskirts of the solar system. Discoveries such as this continue to support biblical creation and challenge secular scenarios for origins.
     
  2. Travelsong

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    I love how this has nothing to do with anything. It's the perfect example of why YEC will be dead within 10 years. It's like you guys have gotten so used to pounding the dogma into your heads that the rhetoric itself serves as the bridge between science and the completely disconnected accusations of the YEC movement.

    Just keep repeating to yourself, "Anything but the actual evidence, anything but the actual evidence".
     
  3. Johnv

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    There's been speculation about there being a possible 10th planet for a while now, since the mathematical equations involving the planetary gravitational pulls have suggested that an additional planet-object's gravity comes itno play. They just didn't know where.

    On a sidenote, if this discovery is indeed agreed upon by everyone to be a 10th planet, does anyone have suggestions for names? Aside from Earth (Sol III), all other planets have names of Roman gods. I kinda like Minerva (goddess of wisdom), Apollo (god of music), or Ceres (goddess of agreculture).
     
  4. UTEOTW

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    Fun. Can't get you to finish any of the ongoing debates or to support all the assertion and claims you make, but we can always count on a new piece of spam from AIG a few times a month.

    "TNOs in general have been quite different from what secular astronomers were expecting. They are far more massive than the comet nuclei that were predicted to lie in the "Kuiper Belt." Of course, 2003 UB313 sets the new record for TNO size, being almost as large as the moon. Moreover, a surprising number of TNOs are binary; they consist of two components that orbit each other as the pair orbits the sun."

    Is this supposed to be an attack of the sort that tries to paint scientists as always getting it wrong? Laughable! Alan Stern, one of the investigators who actually does this work, predicted some time ago that there are at least a thousand Pluto sized objects, some Mars sized objects and possibly some Earth sized objects. Finding large bodies in this area is not surprising.

    In addition, there are not yet telescopes with the necessary resolving power to detect the numerous small objects that are expected to be found. But based on what we know about comets in our own solar system and what we have observed concerning newly formed planetary systems around other stars, they are very likely there.

    And why do you think the binary aspect is surprising? Most of the planets are known to have moons. We have observed asteroids with moons. The largest KBO, Pluto, has long been known to have a moon. The last large KBO announced before this one was discovered with its moon.

    "Such unusual orbital properties must seem a bit surprising to secular astronomers who believe the solar system collapsed from a cloud of gas and dust. In fact, the expectation that planets must lie in the ecliptic may explain why this “tenth planet” was not discovered previously; no one was looking there!"

    Well you did get one part right. No one has been looking there.

    Now they have not been looking there because objects are more likely to be found in the ecliptic and looking there greatly reduces the area to be searched. On the other hand, we have known for quite a while that Pluto is rather inclined and theory suggests that the most distant objects may form more of a shell around the sun than a plane. So, again, I question your assertion that finding a very distant object in a highly inclined orbit is surprising.

    "But such amazing worlds as the distant 2003 UB313 are consistent with the creative power of God."

    You say the every discovery is consistent with your version of creation. Of course it is! YOu will not allow yourself to get tied down to any facts. You have no theory of what we should find. YOu have no ability to make predictions. We cannot say that such and such will be found while such and such will not be. YOu just accept everything after the fact and ignore the obvious implications of the actual data.

    Why don't you try wading into Paul's thread on predictions?
     
  5. Gup20

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    That would make your montra then, "anything but the Word of God... anything but the Word of God".

    We should name it after a woman, don't you think? How about Isis, Hathor, Seshat, Sekhmet or some similar.
     
  6. Johnv

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    None of those are roman deities. The others are Roman. But if you want a women name, I vote for Ceres, the Roman goddess of the fields (agriculture).
     
  7. Magnetic Poles

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    Except that Ceres is the name of the largest asteroid between Mars & Jupiter.
     
  8. Magnetic Poles

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    How about Maia, the Roman goddess of growth, since the known scope of our solar system has just grown.
     
  9. The Galatian

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    Hecate. The dark goddess and protector of far off places and crossroads.
     
  10. UTEOTW

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    Juno, Proserpina, Vulcan

    I vote for Proserpina.
     
  11. Paul of Eugene

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    Creationists, of course, will be able to accomodate any set of planets found anywhere. Astronomers were starting to think they should be looking for such bodies and sure enought they found them. But do you know who we should REALLY feel sorry for now that we've got another planet?

    The astrologers. Pity the poor astrologers, they have to accomodate this brand new planet into all their horoscopes, they have to make up some kind of story as to what aspect of life it governs, they have to come up with some kind of explanation as to why they hadn't noticed its shadowy unseen influence messing up their horoscopes heretofore . . .

    Don't you just feel sorry for them?
     

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