The Wessex Gospels

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by robycop3, Aug 3, 2006.

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  1. robycop3

    robycop3
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    Can anyone provide any info on the "Wessex", or West Saxon Gospels, which appeared in the 900s AD? I have been told that this was the first translation of the Four Gospels into Old English. I have seen the usual Internet sites, which don't tell us very much, so I was wondering if anyone here has any more authoritative info.
     
  2. Logos1560

    Logos1560
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    In the book entitled THE LOLLARD BIBLE, Margaret Deanesly wrote:
    "The earliest surviving gospels, which can properly be called a translation, were the West Saxon gospels of an otherwise unknown Aelfirc, monk of Bath, who wrote about 900, or soon after. There are seven manuscripts of this version, some of a good deal later date" (p. 136).

    Deanesly wrote: "Such Saxon gospels as have been preserved in manuscripts date from about 1050-1100" (p. 137).

    A book entitled THE GOSPELS: GOTHIC, ANGLO-SAXON, WYCLIFFE, AND TYNDALE VERSIONS [arranged in parallel columns] by Joseph Bosworth has the text of the Anglo-Saxon gospels.

    In his preface, Joseph Bosworth wrote: "One peculiar feature of the Anglo-Saxon version may be noticed." "Those terms, which are adopted in other versions from the Hebrew, Greek, and Latin, are generally translated by indigenous Anglo-Saxon compounds" (p. xvii).

    Examples mentioned by Bosworth include:
    for centurion, the Anglo-Saxon has "hundred-man"
    for disciple, the Anglo-Saxon has "learning youth"
    for Sabbath, the Anglo-Saxon has "day of rest"
    for scribe, the Anglo-Saxon has 'book man"
    for Resurrection, the Anglo-Saxon has "a rising again"
     
  3. Keith M

    Keith M
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    I can definitely see some changes. Can you imagine trying to decipher an Anglo-Saxon version today?

    Check out http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Academy/4506/luke-ws.html for the Gospel of Luke in Anglo-Saxon.
     
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