The Words Of Jesus

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Rippon, Dec 15, 2015.

  1. Rippon

    Rippon
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    I had mentioned this in another thread. At Thanksgiving I received Jesus, In His Own Words by Robert H. Mounce. The book is "an account of the life and ministry of Jesus that combines all four Gospels into a single narrative and allows Jesus himself to tell us the story."

    So I think it would be good to give some samples. I will start with a few of the parables of Jesus.

    The Parable Of The Seed Growing Secretly

    "Here is another parable to help you understand what the kingdom of God is like.
    "It is like a man who scatters seed in a field. Then during the day while he is busy with his chores as well as at night while he is sleeping, the seeds sprout and begin to grow. The man doesn't understand how it it all happens; but the soil, all on its own, produces the crop --first the tender shoot, then the head, and in time the head full of grain. When the grain is ripe, the man takes his sickle and begins to reap because harvest time has come." (Mark 4:26-29)

    The Parable Of The Mustard Seed

    I asked, "So what is the kingdom of God like? To what can I compare it so that it will be simple enough for you to understand?
    "The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed which was planted in a garden. It is like a mustard seed which was planted in a garden. It is the smallest of all the seeds, yet when planted and fully grown, it becomes the largest bush in the garden, a veritable tree with branches so large that the birds of the air come and make their nests in its shade." (Matt. 13:31-32; Mark 4:30-32; Luke 13:18-19)

    The Parable Of The Fermented Dough

    I asked again, "What else is there to which I can compare the kingdom of God? It is like fermented dough which a woman took and worked into a bushel of flour until the whole batch had risen." (Matt. 13:33; Luke 13:20-21)
     
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  2. JonC

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    I appreciate many of his commentaries (and I remember watching his son lecture when I was in seminary), but I am not certain that I like the idea of pulling the "words of Jesus" from the narrative itself. One thing that concerns me are those who put more weight on the words in red. But my concerns may very well be misplaced. The parables that you post here spoken in the first person do speak directly at us as the audience and I like the directness that this conveys.

    I'll have to check it out.
     
  3. Rippon

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    A few hours after I made my OP I thought some would mistakenly think I value the words of Jesus over the rest of Holy Writ. No, I don't. I'm not a red-letter Christian. But I do like the perspective that Mounce takes here.
     
  4. JonC

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    We've communicated enough that I knew it didn't apply to you, but it was the first thing that came to my mind concerning the book itself. Considering your recommendation and the author, I will probably add the book to my want list.
     
  5. StFrancis

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    I am concerned about the parables since my definition quotes simplicity. Talk about the eucalyptus tree seed and a fully grown tree. It does not talk about the grownup trees but the seeds. That is how we should simply grow to enter heaven. We come from simple backgrounds but we can go far. I really like the parables.
     
  6. Deacon

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    The Distessaron was an early work that attempted to correlate the gospels. I wonder if Mounce took a similar path.

    Jesus' words were written by the author of the gospels some years after they were spoken. They were recorded with intent, to convey the author's purpose for his gospel. Pulling Jesus' words from their context, particularly the parables, makes interpretation problematic. Mounce wouldn't be unaware of this.

    Rob
     
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  7. Internet Theologian

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    I'm thinking the book would provide an interesting setting. Rippon do you see it as taking the parables out of context and making them more difficult to interpret? (I've always thought of them as having their own context within themselves.)
     
  8. Rippon

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    I agree with you. They're kind of stand-alone units.
     
  9. Internet Theologian

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    I see. It is 304 pages in length, so it has a decent length to it. Looks like a must read so I will pick it up, Lord willing at some point, sounds enjoyable.
     
  10. Rippon

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    My edition is 270 pages (not counting the index).
     
  11. Internet Theologian

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    Then I'll buy 'the shorter one', it'll save me 34 pages lol...Geek
     
  12. Rippon

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    "He Who Has Ears To Hear, Let Him Hear"
    "No one lights a lamp and then covers it with a basket or puts it under the bed. Lamps are to be put on lamp stands so that those who enter the room may see. Nothing is hidden that will not in time be brought out into the open or covered that will not be be made known and brought to light.
    "Take heen what you hear; the measure you use for others will be the measure God uses for you, and he will give you even more. For to those who have, more will be given; but from those who have nothing, even the little they think they have will be taken away."
    (Mark 4:21-25;Luke 8:16-18).
     
  13. Deacon

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    Mounce simply puts the words of Jesus in the historical order he feels is accurate while (1) acknowledging synoptic discrepancies, ("All of this is to say that scholars hold different opinions regarding a number of items that surface when the four gospels are compared. I've used my best judgement as a guide…" Introduction) and (2) minimizing its historical context ("Here and there throughout the translation, I have added a phrase or sentence that provides historical or cultural context." Mounce, Introduction).

    Mounce has a good reputation as a scholar but I'd place this alongside Chronological Bibles as a curiosity to be critically examined.

    Rob
     
  14. JonC

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    That is a good point also, Rob. If we simply examine the parables as stand-alone illustrations apart from the context of both the NT narrative and its 1st century setting then we risk the chance of misapplying or misinterpreting the parables all together. Perhaps the author's intent was that this book supplement and contribute to to our studies.
     

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