This should make you happy

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by Cindy, Mar 25, 2002.

  1. Cindy

    Cindy
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    Elizabeth - I hate breaking into your post, but there is a policy on the BB that one can not use a member's name in the title of a topic. Not your fault, I don't know that it's posted anywhere. [​IMG] - Clint Kritzer, administrator

    'O Brother' cues a record label

    By Brian Mansfield, special for USA TODAY

    First, the soundtrack to O Brother, Where Art Thou? launched a roots-music revival. Then it instigated a firestorm of controversy at country radio.

    Now, it's starting a record label.

    O Brother filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen, along with soundtrack producer T Bone Burnett, are starting DMZ Records as a joint venture with Columbia Records. The label's first release, a Burnett-produced album from mountain-music patriarch Ralph Stanley, is slated for June 11.

    "There is an audience out there, of people that like music, that isn't being reached through the radio at all," says Burnett, who took home four Grammys this year, including awards for producer and album of the year (O Brother). In the case of O Brother, Burnett adds, "we had a movie that was a very good radio station. We also had a lot of word of mouth."

    Stanley's album features musicians who played on the O Brother soundtrack and "songs from 50 to 400 years old," Burnett says.

    "I've always done old-time music, but I'm going back a little farther," says Stanley, who won a Grammy last month for his rendition of O Death from the O Brother soundtrack.

    Stanley's album obviously is timed to take advantage of the soundtrack's multiplatinum success.

    However, "we're not going to try to build a business model around the notion of a traditional American music label," Burnett says. "Our business model is just to make good records."

    "Right now, I think the biggest opening in the music business is for records that aren't attached to a genre," says John Grady, who left a senior vice president's position at Mercury Records Nashville to serve as co-president of the label with New West Records founder Cameron Strang.

    "If they aren't attached, you can't really put anybody off by going in a certain direction. There's a tremendous amount of freedom in the marketing," Grady says.

    DMZ will have offices in Los Angeles and Nashville. The Coens and fellow filmmakers Callie Khouri, Sam Shepard and Wim Wenders, along with musicians Elvis Costello, Tom Waits and Bono, will make up the label's board of advisers.

    Naturally, DMZ will have a strong emphasis on soundtracks.

    "We're going to be working with filmmakers a lot," Burnett says. "There are several filmmakers that have a deep interest in music and are good at it. We're going to work with some of those people and put out quite a few soundtracks."

    The label's first soundtrack likely will be for the Khouri-directed adaptation of Rebecca Wells' 1997 novel, Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood. Like the O Brother soundtrack, it will include both older recordings and contemporary artists singing period pieces. Artists tied to the project include Macy Gray, Lauryn Hill, Alison Krauss, Bob Dylan and Tony Bennett.

    In Burnett, DMZ has one of music's most respected producers: He has worked with wife Sam Phillips, Costello, The Wallflowers, Counting Crows and Roy Orbison. The label may also provide an outlet for his own recordings, the last of which came out 10 years ago.

    "I've been a freelance poet for 35 years now," Burnett says. "It's going to be good to have a base."


    (Any comments, Kiffin & Smoke-Eater? BTW, I love the O Brother soundtrack.--Elizabeth)

    [ April 09, 2002, 11:01 PM: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]
     
  2. Mike McK

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    Elizabeth,

    That does make me happy. Thanks for the good news.

    Anything that involves Dr. Ralph Stanley makes me happy.

    I'm glad to see all of the small labels and imprints popping up all over giving people a chance to decide what they listen to.

    Besides, it's good to know Steve Earle will always have a home.

    Mike

    [ March 25, 2002, 03:43 PM: Message edited by: Smoke_Eater ]
     
  3. Cindy

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    I thought of you immediately when I read the article.

    This kind of music is finding an amazingly diverse audience...from women like me,to my 34-year-old Metallica-loving police detective brother, to my 22-year-old college student son, to pastors of independent fundamental Baptist churches. [​IMG]

    Elizabeth
     
  4. Mike McK

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    Elizabeth,

    You'd be amazed how many kids are listening to the "Oh, Brother" soundtrack.

    It's a bona fide phenomenon.

    There was a show at a local club in which a local band did it's own version of "Down From the Mountain".

    The place was packed with college kids and they knew every word.

    I almost fell off my stool.

    "Oh Brother", coupled with the success of the "Songcatcher" soundtrack, can only be good news.

    EmmyLou Harris said once "If our children know what bluegrass music is, we'll have Ricky Skaggs to thank for it". (or words to that effect)

    I think we can safely include T-Bone Burnette and the Coen Brothers in that now.

    Mike

    http://www.bluegrasscountry.org
     
  5. Bro. Curtis

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    My daughter wears her Ricky Skaggs t-shirt to school & nobody knows who it is...too into N-Stink I suppose. She loves bluegrass & I take her when I can to various shows. She has seen me perform with my pickin' buddies & never gets bored. I hope it lasts a lifetime with her, just like my dad did to me when I was a youngster.

    I would rather listen to the Monroe Brothers than anything out there today. Acoustic folk music is my passion. [​IMG]

    [ March 26, 2002, 04:07 AM: Message edited by: Mr. Curtis ]
     
  6. Mike McK

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    Curtis,

    We have a weekend place in on the river in Maryland and bluegrass is huge down here.

    Front Range, Dean Sapp, Claire Lynch, David Parmley and Scott Vestal are all from this area and they play here quite a bit.

    There's a big name artist playing locally nearly every weekend and there are always a lot of young people.

    We saw the James King Band (I love their version of "I Overlooked an Orchid") a couple of weeks ago and that was the first show I'd been to in a long time that was an older crowd.

    Last year, at the Delaware Vally Bluegrass Festival, which has virtualy every major artist in bluegrass today is quickly becoming one of the largest festivals in the country, we were going to go as part of a group from the University of Delaware and there ended up being four buses full of college students.

    I know that's not the norm, but bluegrass and folk is huge here.

    I'm surprised that it's not that way in your area since you guys have such a great folk music history.

    You know, there's just something so beautiful about music that can grow and progress in different ways and still keep the basic elements it had 100 years ago.

    Mike

    http://www.bluegrasscountry.org

    [ March 26, 2002, 11:41 AM: Message edited by: Smoke_Eater ]
     
  7. Bro. Curtis

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    I agree. And the gospel music they sing, they sing it with a reverence that I find missing in most CCM music I hear. There isn't a large Bluegrass movement here. The folkie clubs are the new-age "me" music coffee houses. Luckily for me, my brother is as much of a freak as I am about this music & plays guitar with me a lot.

    I checked out the Delaware Valley Bluegrass Festival's website, & it looks like I will probably be going.,Thanx...
     
  8. fromtheright

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    Smoke-Eater,

    After our Buffett discussion, to find out you're also an O' Brother/bluegrass fan. Cool.

    I found a great collection a few weeks ago, Clinch Mountain Sweethearts, female country singers accompanying Ralph Stanley on some wonderful songs, including my favorite, I think, "Angel Band". Have you heard Patti Loveless's Mountain Soul? I've been interested but haven't heard it yet, supposed to be some of the same flavor. There is also Clinch Mountain Country, a two CD-set I think, of Stanley and various country singers, as well as O' Sister, all female bluegrass, both of which I have my eyes on.

    Later, Mike,

    Gene

    [ March 30, 2002, 07:35 PM: Message edited by: fromtheright ]
     
  9. Mike McK

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    Hey, Gene,

    I'm a big bluegrass fan, especially anything with Dr. Ralph Stanley.

    I have "Clinch Mountain Sweethearts", "Clinch Mountain Country" and "Mountain Soul". They're all really good.

    I don't know if you've ever heard of a guy named Jim Lauderdale, but he and Dr. Ralph put out an album called "I Feel Like Singing Today".

    If you like "Oh Brother" and "Oh Sister", have you seen "Songcatcher"?

    Like "Oh, Brother", it's built around a bluegrass/old time soundtrack.

    Mike
     
  10. fromtheright

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    Hi Mike,

    I'm pretty much a newbie to bluegrass (I like the name "old time" better; in my uninitiated mind, there seems a difference between instrumental bluegrass and the sound of O' Brother). Part of my introduction was going to a couple of dinners on the ground at Jim Connors' (author of "Grandma's Feather Bed" that John Denver sang; he lives near my wife's family and they've known him for years) where a bunch of old folks would sit around after dinner "making music". A really beautiful sound, the mandolin, fiddle, etc.

    Before O' Brother I went to the Tennessee Valley Old Time Fiddlers' Convention once and enjoyed it. They had various competitions but the absolute best part was the small groups that would set their instruments up at various places throughout the campus where the convention was, making music. Went back for the second time this year, post-O' Brother with a better appreciation for it.

    Then O' Brother came out. Such beautiful music. One of the things I most appreciate about country music in general is that it is really American music, that tells stories of love, tragedy, joys of family and simple things, that doesn't look over its shoulder to sing about love of country or of God. O' Brother pointed me to the real roots of that sound. Just as A1A and White Sport Coat were "before the beach" for Buffett, this sound is "before the rhinestones" for country music.

    I haven't heard of Lauderdale but Songcatcher rings a bell and I'll have to look up both.

    Take care, Mike.

    Gene
     
  11. Mike McK

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  12. Mike McK

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    I went to the Delaware Valley Bluegrass Festival over the Labor Day Weekend and, once again, the huge numbers of young people there seem to bear out some of the things said here.

    Gene, did you ever find "Songcatcher"?
     
  13. Joshua Rhodes

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    This Sunday at church, we are honoring our senior adults. We'll have all gospel music in the service, a sermon from our pastor, dinner on the grounds, and then back into the sanctuary for a "singin'". I'm kind of excited about it.

    One of the other things I'm really excited about is that my choir is going to sing Down in the River to Pray, sung by Alison Krauss on the "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack. It's based on that recording, but a little more of my own arrangement. I'm really excited! Hope everyone likes it as much as my choir!
     

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