Thoughts On The American Fur Trade Period.

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by poncho, Jul 12, 2004.

  1. poncho

    poncho
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    Always loved to read the tales of the old mountain men. The dress, customs and politics of the native Americans. It must have been one of the more colorful times in American history, I reckon.

    Anyone have any "yarns to spin" about this period?
     
  2. Daisy

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    That was just a bit before my time.
     
  3. poncho

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    1750's to 1830's or so. Ayeh I reckon it would be a bit before your time.
     
  4. Daisy

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    But the Astor St. station of the NYC subway (pretty sure it's the BMT line) has beavor mosaic tiles in honor of Astor's fur trade.
     
  5. Dr. Bob

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    As a die-hard Civil War reenactor, we don't have much good to say about the Mountain Man events. Lots of coolers and Coors. Funa nd games, but not very authentic.

    We have used some for "hostiles" in skirmishes. From brush along the river, you couldn't tell WHO was shooting at Company I.

    Do enjoy that era, living right on the Oregon Trail (now paved over as a city street, of course) and in the rendezvous area. Couple of years ago, we blew an anvil at Independence Rock on the 4th of July (for German TV)
     
  6. Roy

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    Kit Carson trapped and traveled with mountain men when he was still a boy. He told of his small group comming under an Indian attack once, and for defense, they shot their three mules, dragged them into a close triangular formation and took cover in the middle of them. They discovered that if they took aim on the Indian leader and killed him, the attack would stop while the Indians would have a mandatory ceremony to mourn his loss and choose another leader. They bought themselves a lot of time by picking off the leader until help arrived.

    Another time, his group had run out of water while traveling and bled their mules in order to have something to drink.

    The mountain men deliberately grew their hair long in order for the Indians to have a worthwhile souvenir in the event that any of them were taken. The were a really tough breed of men.

    Roy
     
  7. Roy

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    What do you mean by "blew an anvil", Dr. Bob?

    Roy
     
  8. Major B

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    "...The were a really tough breed of men...."

    You said it...have you ever tried to blow up an anvil?
     
  9. Major B

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    Well, Bob and I remember it well...
     
  10. poncho

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    My brothers and I trapped a heap when we were young for cash to buy possibles and fooferah. twernt easy. Can't imagine doing it for a living when there were so many hostiles out there waitin ta lift yer hair.
     
  11. Dr. Bob

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    Closest thing to a canon/fireworks you could get was to "blow up and anvil".

    Compress black powder in a deep 4" diameter hole. Put anvil on top of it (or bury it on tope of the powder for even MORE spectacular explosion) and set off a fuse. It fires the anvil (smaller, portable anvil used on the trail - probably ony 30#) up in the air like a skyrocket.
     
  12. Dr. Bob

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    Christopher Houston "Kit" CARSON was born 24 December 1809 in Madison County, KY and died 23 May, 1868 Fort Lyon, CO. He is bured in Taos, New Mexico.

    Wife #1 - Waa-Nibe (Singing Wind) 1819-1838
    Married: 1835
    Wife #2 - Making-Out-Road 1823-1890
    Married: 1840
    Wife #3 - Maria Josefa Jaramillo, 19 March 1828 and died 23 April, 1868, one month before Kit.
    Married: 1843, Guadalupe Church, Taos, New Mexico
     
  13. LadyEagle

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    http://www.conservation.state.mo.us/kids/out-in/2003/01/3.htm
     
  14. Roy

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    So, what's the heaviest anvil you ever blew up or saw blown up? Do you ever attach streamers or maybe even a parachute to the anvil?

    That all sounds like good clean fun. I need to show that trick to the kids at church so they can show all their friends.

    Roy
     
  15. JCole

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